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Page 105

PART I - IN THE SHADOW OF DEATH
CHAPTER 13 - THE WIVES

others were just tired and worn-out. We learned during these visiting hours that everyday grind was taking a heavy toll not only of us, prisoners behind bars, but also of them, prisoners in spirit.
In spite of my homemade sweater, I could not battle the cold successfully, and in January I developed a bad case of flu. We needed vitamins and some better food. These were impossible to get. All the dispensary had to offer was aspirin which had been rejected by the hospitals. Our doctors always kept their fingers crossed in the hope that none of the medicine would cause real trouble to their patients. I wore my sweater faithfully, and must admit that I was as proud as a peacock of my creation. This, together with second-rate aspirins and the vitality I seem to have retained even during those years, saved me from complications and allowed me to recover.
My one major grievance was that while nearly everybody else already had visitors, my wife was not yet allowed to see me. I received letters from her, however, and felt that she was the best wife any man could have. We had so many memories in common, and I knew that our marriage was based on firmer foundations than the average marriage. During the difficult Nazi times we had survived together, as well as during our struggle against Communism, and the conflicts had tied us with bonds that no human being could break. I kept sending my earnings to her every month, and I could see from her letters that the money was needed and welcome. One thing struck me as Strange in the course of our correspondence-my mother's writing never appeared in any of the letters. It was already spring when the letter came with the tragic news that she had passed on.
Round and round we went on our daily walks, and more often than not my eyes would rest on the walls of the graveyard. I felt that I was growing very old, and I knew that those of us who were spending many of their most productive years behind prison walls, were, in a way, suffering a slow death. I learned

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE others were just tired and worn-out. We learned during these what is ing hours that everyday grind was taking a heavy toll not only of us, prisoners behind bars, but also of them, prisoners in spirit. In spite of my homemade sweater, I could not battle what is cold successfully, and in January I developed a bad case of flu. We needed vitamins and some better food. These were impossible to get. All what is dispensary had to offer was aspirin which had been rejected by what is hospitals. Our doctors always kept their fingers crossed in what is hope that none of what is medicine would cause real trouble to their patients. I wore my sweater faithfully, and must admit that I was as proud as a peacock of my creation. This, together with second-rate aspirins and what is vitality I seem to have retained even during those years, saved me from complications and allowed me to recover. My one major grievance was that while ne where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" You are All Alone(1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 105 where is strong PART I - IN what is SHADOW OF what time is it CHAPTER 13 - what is WIVES where is p align="justify" others were just tired and worn-out. We learned during these what is ing hours that everyday grind was taking a heavy toll not only of us, prisoners behind bars, but also of them, prisoners in spirit. In spite of my homemade sweater, I could not battle what is cold successfully, and in January I developed a bad case of flu. We needed vitamins and some better food. These were impossible to get. All what is dispensary had to offer was aspirin which had been rejected by what is hospitals. Our doctors always kept their fingers crossed in what is hope that none of what is medicine would cause real trouble to their patients. I wore my sweater faithfully, and must admit that I was as proud as a peacock of my creation. This, together with second-rate aspirins and what is vitality I seem to have retained even during those years, saved me from complications and allowed me to recover. My one major grievance was that while nearly everybody else already had what is ors, my wife was not yet allowed to see me. I received letters from her, however, and felt that she was what is best wife any man could have. We had so many memories in common, and I knew that our marriage was based on firmer foundations than what is average marriage. During what is difficult Nazi times we had survived together, as well as during our struggle against Communism, and what is conflicts had tied us with bonds that no human being could break. I kept sending my earnings to her every month, and I could see from her letters that what is money was needed and welcome. One thing struck me as Strange in what is course of our correspondence-my mother's writing never appeared in any of what is letters. It was already spring when what is letter came with what is tragic news that she had passed on. Round and round we went on our daily walks, and more often than not my eyes would rest on what is walls of what is graveyard. I felt that I was growing very old, and I knew that those of us who were spending many of their most productive years behind prison walls, were, in a way, suffering a slow what time is it . I learned where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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