Books > Old Books > They Die With Their Boots Clean (1953)


Page 104

THE FOUNDRY

dressed, or forgetting to salute an officer, or having a dirty cap-star, or a dirty bayonet, or standing idle on parade, or being inattentive on parade, or speaking out of turn, or laughing, or crying, or using horribledirty words, or not walking properly, or not getting up at Reveille, or not putting out the lights at Lights Out, or skiving . . ."
" What is Skiving?"
" The same as Swinging It. Trying to get out of things; dodging a parade, wangling a fatigue, or otherwise chancing your arm. Slipping out for a tea 'n' a wad when on fatigue is, for instance, Skiving."
" What's a Wad?"
" Shiver-and-Shake. A Cake. (Get on with that shining!) There's no need to go round bobbing : just keep calm and do your dooty, and you'll keep out of trouble."
" What's Bobbing?"
" Oh ... sort of bobbing; getting nerves, worrying. You, Dale, your boots are very steady."
" Thanks, Trained Soldier," says Dale, gratified; for to this good man "Steady" is the highest possible praise of a man or his job.
" Thanks? Thanks for what? In the. Guards, son, `Steady' means `Absolutely lousy'. If you want to sort of spit in a man's eye, call him Steady. If, on the other hand, you want to give him a bit o' praise, then say he's Hat. `Steady' means Awful, so get working. I know you're not used to it yet : don't get down'earted. Rub your polish well in, then spit nice clear spit, and rub it in with a circular motion. If you're using a bone, then bone your boots with a kind of smooth,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE dressed, or forgetting to salute an officer, or having a dirty cap-star, or a dirty bayonet, or standing idle on parade, or being inattentive on parade, or speaking out of turn, or laughing, or crying, or using horribledirty words, or not walking properly, or not getting up at Reveille, or not putting out what is lights at Lights Out, or skiving . . ." "What is Skiving?" "The same as Swinging It. Trying to get out of things; dodging a parade, wangling a fatigue, or otherwise chancing your arm. Slipping out for a tea 'n' a wad when on fatigue is, for instance, Skiving." "What's a Wad?" "Shiver-and-Shake. A Cake. (Get on with that shining!) There's no need to go round bobbing : just keep calm and do your dooty, and you'll keep out of trouble." "What's Bobbing?" "Oh ... sort of bobbing; getting nerves, worrying. You, Dale, your boots are very steady." "Thanks, Trained Soldier," says Dale, gratified; for to this good man "Steady" is what is highest possible praise of a man or his job. "Thanks? Thanks for what? In the. Guards, son, `Steady' means `Absolutely lousy'. If you want to sort of spit in a man's eye, call him Steady. If, on what is other hand, you want to give him a bit o' praise, then say he's Hat. `Steady' means Awful, so get working. I know you're not used to it yet : don't get down'earted. Rub your polish well in, then spit nice clear spit, and rub it in with a circular motion. If you're using a bone, then bone your boots with a kind of smooth, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" They travel With Their Boots Clean (1953) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 104 where is p align="center" where is strong THE FOUNDRY where is p align="justify" dressed, or forgetting to salute an officer, or having a dirty cap-star, or a dirty bayonet, or standing idle on parade, or being inattentive on parade, or speaking out of turn, or laughing, or crying, or using horribledirty words, or not walking properly, or not getting up at Reveille, or not putting out the lights at Lights Out, or skiving . . ." " What is Skiving?" " what is same as Swinging It. Trying to get out of things; dodging a parade, wangling a fatigue, or otherwise chancing your arm. Slipping out for a tea 'n' a wad when on fatigue is, for instance, Skiving." " What's a Wad?" " Shiver-and-Shake. A Cake. (Get on with that shining!) There's no need to go round bobbing : just keep calm and do your dooty, and you'll keep out of trouble." " What's Bobbing?" " Oh ... sort of bobbing; getting nerves, worrying. You, Dale, your boots are very steady." " Thanks, Trained Soldier," says Dale, gratified; for to this good man "Steady" is what is highest possible praise of a man or his job. " Thanks? Thanks for what? In the. Guards, son, `Steady' means `Absolutely lousy'. If you want to sort of spit in a man's eye, call him Steady. If, on what is other hand, you want to give him a bit o' praise, then say he's Hat. `Steady' means Awful, so get working. I know you're not used to it yet : don't get down'earted. Rub your polish well in, then spit nice clear spit, and rub it in with a circular motion. If you're using a bone, then bone your boots with a kind of smooth, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: They Die With Their Boots Clean books

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