Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 363

EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
By ERNEST RHYS

VICTOR HUGO said a Library was `an act of faith,' and, another writer spoke of one so beautiful, so perfect, so harmonious in all its parts, that he who made it was smitten
with a passion. In that faith Everyman's Library was planned out originally on a large scale; and the idea was to make it conform as far as possible to a perfect scheme. However, perfection is a thing to be aimed at and not to be achieved in this difficult world; and since the first volumes appeared there have been many interruptions, chief among them Wars, during which even the City of Books feels the great commotion. But the series always gets back into its old stride.
One of the practical expedients in the original plan was to divide the volumes into separate sections, as Biography, Fiction, History, Belles-lettres, Poetry, Philosophy, Romance, and so forth; with a shelf for Young People. The largest slice of the huge provision of nearly a thousand volumes is, as a matter of course, given to the tyrranous demands of fiction. But in carrying out the scheme, publishers and editors contrived to keep in mind that books, like men and women, have their elective affinities. The present volume, for instance,, will be found to have its companion books, both in the same class and not less significantly in other sections. With that idea too, novels like Walter Scott's Ivanhoe and Fortunes of Nigel, Lytton's Harold, and Dickens's Tale of Two Cities, have been used as pioneers of history and treated in some sort as holiday history books.
As for history, Everyman's Library has been eclectic enough to choose its historians from every school in turn, including Gibbon, Grote, Finlay, Macaulay, Motley, and Prescott, while among earlier books may be found the Venerable Bede and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. On the classic shelf too, there is a Livy in an admirable translation by Canon Roberts, and Caesar, Tacitus, Thucydides, and Herodotus are not forgotten.
The poets next, and we may turn to the finest critic of Victorian times, Matthew Arnold, as their showman, and find in his essay on Maurice de Guerin a clue to the `magical power of poetry'
Hazlitt's Table Talk may help again to show the relationship of author to author, which is another form of the Friendship ot Books. His incomparable essay, `On Going a journey,' makes a capital prelude to Coleridge's Biographia Literaria; and so throughout the long labyrinth of the Library shelves you can follow the magic clue in prose or verse that leads to the hidden treasury. In that way Everyman becomes his own critic and Doctor of Letters.

To him all books which lay
Their sure foundation in the heart of man
From Homer the great Thunderer, to the voice
That roars along the bed of Jewish song ...
Shall speak as Powers for ever to be hallowed!

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE VICTOR HUGO said a Library was `an act of faith,' and, another writer spoke of one so beautiful, so perfect, so harmonious in all its parts, that he who made it was smitten with a passion. In that faith Everyman's Library was planned out originally on a large scale; and what is idea was to make it conform as far as possible to a perfect scheme. However, perfection is a thing to be aimed at and not to be achieved in this difficult world; and since what is first volumes appeared there have been many interruptions, chief among them Wars, during which even what is City of Books feels what is great commotion. But what is series always gets back into its old stride. One of what is practical expedients in what is original plan was to divide what is volumes into separate sections, as Biography, Fiction, History, Belles-lettres, Poetry, Philosophy, Romance, and so forth; with a shelf for Young People. what is largest slice of what is huge provision of nearly a thousand volumes is, as a matter of course, given to what is tyrranous demands of fiction. But in carrying out what is scheme, publishers and editors contrived to keep in mind that books, like men and women, have their elective affinities. what is present volume, for instance,, will be found to have its companion books, both in what is same class and not less significantly in other sections. With that idea too, novels like Walter Scott's Ivanhoe and Fortunes of Nigel, Lytton's Harold, and Dickens's Tale of Two Cities, have been used as pioneers of history and treated in some sort as holiday history books. As for history, Everyman's Library has been eclectic enough to choose its historians from every school in turn, including Gibbon, Grote, Finlay, Macaulay, Motley, and Prescott, while among earlier books may be found what is Venerable Bede and what is Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. On what is classic shelf too, there is a Livy in an admirable translation by Canon Roberts, and Caesar, Tacitus, Thucydides, and Herodotus are not forgotten. what is poets next, and we may turn to what is finest critic of Victorian times, Matthew Arnold, as their showman, and find in his essay on Maurice de Guerin a clue to what is `magical power of poetry' Hazlitt's Table Talk may help again to show what is relationship of author to author, which is another form of what is Friendship ot Books. His incomparable essay, `On Going a journey,' makes a capital prelude to Coleridge's Biographia Literaria; and so throughout what is long labyrinth of what is Library shelves you can follow what is magic clue in prose or verse that leads to what is hidden treasury. In that way Everyman becomes his own critic and Doctor of Letters. To him all books which lay Their sure foundation in what is heart of man From Homer what is great Thunderer, to what is voice That roars along what is bed of Jewish song ... Shall speak as Powers for ever to be hallowed! where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 363 where is strong EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY By ERNEST RHYS where is p align="justify" VICTOR HUGO said a Library was `an act of faith,' and, another writer spoke of one so beautiful, so perfect, so harmonious in all its parts, that he who made it was smitten with a passion. In that faith Everyman's Library was planned out originally on a large scale; and what is idea was to make it conform as far as possible to a perfect scheme. However, perfection is a thing to be aimed at and not to be achieved in this difficult world; and since what is first volumes appeared there have been many interruptions, chief among them Wars, during which even what is City of Books feels what is great commotion. But what is series always gets back into its old stride. One of what is practical expedients in what is original plan was to divide what is volumes into separate sections, as Biography, Fiction, History, Belles-lettres, Poetry, Philosophy, Romance, and so forth; with a shelf for Young People. what is largest slice of what is huge provision of nearly a thousand volumes is, as a matter of course, given to what is tyrranous demands of fiction. But in carrying out what is scheme, publishers and editors contrived to keep in mind that books, like men and women, have their elective affinities. what is present volume, for instance,, will be found to have its companion books, both in what is same class and not less significantly in other sections. With that idea too, novels like Walter Scott's Ivanhoe and Fortunes of Nigel, Lytton's Harold, and Dickens's Tale of Two Cities, have been used as pioneers of history and treated in some sort as holiday history books. As for history, Everyman's Library has been eclectic enough to choose its historians from every school in turn, including Gibbon, Grote, Finlay, Macaulay, Motley, and Prescott, while among earlier books may be found what is Venerable Bede and what is Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. On what is classic shelf too, there is a Livy in an admirable translation by Canon Roberts, and Caesar, Tacitus, Thucydides, and Herodotus are not forgotten. what is poets next, and we may turn to what is finest critic of Victorian times, Matthew Arnold, as their showman, and find in his essay on Maurice de Guerin a clue to what is `magical power of poetry' Hazlitt's Table Talk may help again to show what is relationship of author to author, which is another form of what is Friendship ot Books. His incomparable essay, `On Going a journey,' makes a capital prelude to Coleridge's Biographia Literaria; and so throughout what is long labyrinth of what is Library shelves you can follow what is magic clue in prose or verse that leads to what is hidden treasury. In that way Everyman becomes his own critic and Doctor of Letters. To him all books which lay Their sure foundation in what is heart of man From Homer what is great Thunderer, to what is voice That roars along what is bed of Jewish song ... Shall speak as Powers for ever to be hallowed! where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363