Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 360

PART III - CHAPTER VIII
A PROSPECT AMONG THE MARSHES OF LETHE

clammy with small fungi, he stood leaning against the gate, while the dim afternoon drifted with a flow of thick sweet sunshine past him, not touching him.
In the stackyard, the summer's splendid monuments of wheat and grass were reared in gold and grey. The wheat was littered brightly round the rising stack. The loaded wagon clanked slowly up the incline, drew near, and rode like a ship at anchor against the scotches, brushing the stack with a crisp, sharp sound. Tom climbed the ladder and stood a moment there against the sky, amid the brightness and fragrance of the gold corn, and waved his arm to his wife who was passing in the shadow of the building. Then Arthur began to lift the sheaves to the stack, and the two men worked in an exquisite, subtle rhythm, their white sleeves and their dark heads gleaming, moving against the mild sky and the corn. The silence was broken only by the occasional lurch of the body of the wagon, as the teamer stepped to the front, or again to the rear of the load. Occasionally I could catch the blue glitter of the prongs of the forks. Tom, now lifted high above the small wagon load, called to his brother some question about the stack. The sound of his voice was strong and mellow.
I turned to George, who also was watching, and said :
'You ought to be like that.'
We heard Tom calling, `All right!' and saw him standing high up on the tallest corner of the stack, as on the prow of a ship.
George watched, and his face slowly gathered expression. He turned to me, his dark eyes alive with horror and despair.
` I shall soon-be out of everybody's way !'he said. His moment of fear and despair was cruel. I cursed myself for having roused him from his stupor.
`You will be better,' I said.
He watched again the handsome movement of the men at the stack.
`I couldn't team ten sheaves,' he said.
`You will in a month or two,' I urged.
He continued to watch, while Tom got on the ladder and came down the front of the stack.

Page 361

PART III - CHAPTER VIII
A PROSPECT AMONG THE MARSHES OF LETHE

`Nay, the sooner I clear out, the better,' he repeated to himself.
When we went in to tea, he was, as Tom said, `downcast.' The men talked uneasily with abated voices. Emily attended to him with a little, palpitating solicitude. We were all uncomfortably impressed with the sense of our alienation from him. He sat apart and obscure among us, like a condemned man.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE clammy with small fungi, he stood leaning against what is gate, while what is dim afternoon drifted with a flow of thick sweet sunshine past him, not touching him. In what is stackyard, what is summer's splendid monuments of wheat and grass were reared in gold and grey. what is wheat was littered brightly round what is rising stack. what is loaded wagon clanked slowly up what is incline, drew near, and rode like a ship at anchor against what is scotches, brushing what is stack with a crisp, sharp sound. Tom climbed what is ladder and stood a moment there against what is sky, amid what is brightness and fragrance of what is gold corn, and waved his arm to his wife who was passing in what is shadow of what is building. Then Arthur began to lift what is sheaves to what is stack, and what is two men worked in an exquisite, subtle rhythm, their white sleeves and their dark heads gleaming, moving against what is mild sky and what is corn. what is silence was broken only by what is occasional lurch of what is body of what is wagon, as what is teamer stepped to what is front, or again to what is rear of what is load. Occasionally I could catch what is blue glitter of what is prongs of what is forks. Tom, now lifted high above what is small wagon load, called to his brother some question about what is stack. what is sound of his voice was strong and mellow. I turned to George, who also was watching, and said : 'You ought to be like that.' We heard Tom calling, `All right!' and saw him standing high up on what is tallest corner of what is stack, as on what is prow of a ship. George watched, and his face slowly gathered expression. He turned to me, his dark eyes alive with horror and despair. ` I shall soon-be out of everybody's way !'he said. His moment of fear and despair was cruel. I cursed myself for having roused him from his stupor. `You will be better,' I said. He watched again what is handsome movement of what is men at what is stack. `I couldn't team ten sheaves,' he said. `You will in a month or two,' I urged. He continued to watch, while Tom got on what is ladder and came down what is front of what is stack. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 360 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VIII A PROSPECT AMONG what is MARSHES OF LETHE where is p align="justify" clammy with small fungi, he stood leaning against what is gate, while what is dim afternoon drifted with a flow of thick sweet sunshine past him, not touching him. In what is stackyard, what is summer's splendid monuments of wheat and grass were reared in gold and grey. what is wheat was littered brightly round what is rising stack. what is loaded wagon clanked slowly up what is incline, drew near, and rode like a ship at anchor against what is scotches, brushing what is stack with a crisp, sharp sound. Tom climbed what is ladder and stood a moment there against what is sky, amid what is brightness and fragrance of what is gold corn, and waved his arm to his wife who was passing in what is shadow of what is building. Then Arthur began to lift what is sheaves to what is stack, and what is two men worked in an exquisite, subtle rhythm, their white sleeves and their dark heads gleaming, moving against what is mild sky and what is corn. what is silence was broken only by what is occasional lurch of what is body of what is wagon, as what is teamer stepped to what is front, or again to what is rear of what is load. Occasionally I could catch what is blue glitter of what is prongs of what is forks. Tom, now lifted high above what is small wagon load, called to his brother some question about what is stack. what is sound of his voice was strong and mellow. I turned to George, who also was watching, and said : 'You ought to be like that.' We heard Tom calling, `All right!' and saw him standing high up on what is tallest corner of what is stack, as on what is prow of a ship. George watched, and his face slowly gathered expression. He turned to me, his dark eyes alive with horror and despair. ` I shall soon-be out of everybody's way !'he said. His moment of fear and despair was cruel. I cursed myself for having roused him from his stupor. `You will be better,' I said. He watched again what is handsome movement of what is men at what is stack. `I couldn't team ten sheaves,' he said. `You will in a month or two,' I urged. He continued to watch, while Tom got on what is ladder and came down what is front of what is stack. where is p align="left" Page 361 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VIII A PROSPECT AMONG what is MARSHES OF LETHE where is p align="justify" `Nay, what is sooner I clear out, what is better,' he repeated to himself. When we went in to tea, he was, as Tom said, `downcast.' what is men talked uneasily with abated voices. Emily attended to him with a little, palpitating solicitude. We were all uncomfortably impressed with what is sense of our alienation from him. He sat apart and obscure among us, like a condemned man. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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