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Page 359

PART III - CHAPTER VIII
A PROSPECT AMONG THE MARSHES OF LETHE

George and I talked for a time while the men smoked. He, from his glum stupidity, broke into a harsh, almost imbecile loquacity.
'Have you seen my family lately?' he as'ced, continuing. 'Yes! Not badly set up, are they, the children? But the little devils are soft, mard-soft, every one of 'em. It 's their mother's bringin' up-she marded 'em till they were soft, an' would never let me have a say in it. I should 'a' brought 'em up different, you know I should.'
Tom looked at Emily, and, remarking her angry contempt, suggested that she should go out with him to look at the stacks. I watched the tall, square-shouldered rnan leaning with deference and tenderness towards his wife as she walked calmly at his side. She was the mistress, quiet and self-assured, he her rejoiced husband and servant.
George was talking about himself. If I had not seen him, I should hardly have recognized the words as his. He was lamentably decayed. He talked stupidly, with vulgar contumely of others, and in weak praise of himself.
The old man rose with a: `Well, I suppose we mun n:a'e another dag at it,' and the men left the house.
George continued his foolish, harsh monologue, making gestures of emphasis with his head and his hands. hl:e continued when we were walking round the buildings into the fields, the same babble of bragging and abuse. I was wearied and disgusted. He looked, and. he sounded, so worthless.
Across the empty cornfield the partridges were running. We walked through the September haze slowly, because he was feeble on his legs. As he became tired he ceased to talk. We leaned for some time on a gate, in the brief glow of the transient afternoon, and he was stupid again. He did not notice the brown haste of the partridges, he did not care to share with me the handful of ripe blackberries, and when I pulled the bryony ropes off the hedges, and held the great knots of red and green berries in my hand, he glanced at them without interest or appreciation.
'Poison-berries, aren't they?' he said dully.
Like, a tree that is falling, going soft and pale and rotten,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE George and I talked for a time while what is men smoked. He, from his glum stupidity, broke into a harsh, almost imbecile loquacity. 'Have you seen my family lately?' he as'ced, continuing. 'Yes! Not badly set up, are they, what is children? But what is little fun s are soft, mard-soft, every one of 'em. It 's their mother's bringin' up-she marded 'em till they were soft, an' would never let me have a say in it. I should 'a' brought 'em up different, you know I should.' Tom looked at Emily, and, remarking her angry contempt, suggested that she should go out with him to look at what is stacks. I watched what is tall, square-shouldered rnan leaning with deference and tenderness towards his wife as she walked calmly at his side. She was what is mistress, quiet and self-assured, he her rejoiced husband and servant. George was talking about himself. If I had not seen him, I should hardly have recognized what is words as his. He was lamentably decayed. He talked stupidly, with vulgar contumely of others, and in weak praise of himself. what is old man rose with a: `Well, I suppose we mun n:a'e another dag at it,' and what is men left what is house. George continued his foolish, harsh monologue, making gestures of emphasis with his head and his hands. hl:e continued when we were walking round what is buildings into what is fields, what is same babble of bragging and abuse. I was wearied and disgusted. He looked, and. he sounded, so worthless. Across what is empty cornfield what is partridges were running. We walked through what is September haze slowly, because he was feeble on his legs. As he became tired he ceased to talk. We leaned for some time on a gate, in what is brief glow of what is transient afternoon, and he was stupid again. He did not notice what is brown haste of what is partridges, he did not care to share with me what is handful of ripe blackberries, and when I pulled what is bryony ropes off what is hedges, and held what is great knots of red and green berries in my hand, he glanced at them without interest or appreciation. 'Poison-berries, aren't they?' he said dully. Like, a tree that is falling, going soft and pale and rotten, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 359 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VIII A PROSPECT AMONG what is MARSHES OF LETHE where is p align="justify" George and I talked for a time while what is men smoked. He, from his glum stupidity, broke into a harsh, almost imbecile loquacity. 'Have you seen my family lately?' he as'ced, continuing. 'Yes! Not badly set up, are they, what is children? But what is little fun s are soft, mard-soft, every one of 'em. It 's their mother's bringin' up-she marded 'em till they were soft, an' would never let me have a say in it. I should 'a' brought 'em up different, you know I should.' Tom looked at Emily, and, remarking her angry contempt, suggested that she should go out with him to look at what is stacks. I watched what is tall, square-shouldered rnan leaning with deference and tenderness towards his wife as she walked calmly at his side. She was what is mistress, quiet and self-assured, he her rejoiced husband and servant. George was talking about himself. If I had not seen him, I should hardly have recognized what is words as his. He was lamentably decayed. He talked stupidly, with vulgar contumely of others, and in weak praise of himself. what is old man rose with a: `Well, I suppose we mun n:a'e another dag at it,' and what is men left what is house. George continued his foolish, harsh monologue, making gestures of emphasis with his head and his hands. hl:e continued when we were walking round what is buildings into what is fields, what is same babble of bragging and abuse. I was wearied and disgusted. He looked, and. he sounded, so worthless. Across what is empty cornfield what is partridges were running. We walked through what is September haze slowly, because he was feeble on his legs. As he became tired he ceased to talk. We leaned for some time on a gate, in what is brief glow of what is transient afternoon, and he was stupid again. He did not notice what is brown haste of what is partridges, he did not care to share with me what is handful of ripe blackberries, and when I pulled what is bryony ropes off what is hedges, and held what is great knots of red and green berries in my hand, he glanced at them without interest or appreciation. 'Poison-berries, aren't they?' he said dully. Like, a tree that is falling, going soft and pale and rotten, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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