Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 357

PART III - CHAPTER VIII
A PROSPECT AMONG THE MARSHES OF LETHE

he went on with his slow, painful toilet. As he combed his hair he looked at himself with dull eyes of shame.
The men were coming in from the scullery when we got downstairs. Dinner was smoking on the table. I shook hands with Tom Renshaw, and with the old man's hard, fierce left hand. Then I was introduced to Arthur Renshaw, a clean-faced, large, bashful lad of twenty. I nodded to the man, Jim, and to Jim's wife, Annie. We all sat down to table.
`Well, an' 'ow are ter feelin' by now, like?' asked the old man heartily of George. Receiving no answer, he continued: `Tha should 'a' gor up an' com' an' gen us a 'and wi' th' wheat, it 'ud 'a' done thee good.'
`You will have a bit of this mutton, won't you?' Tom asked him, tapping the joint with the carving knife. George shook his head. "
'It 's quite lean, and tender,' he said gently.
`No, thanks,' said George.
` Gi 'e 'im a bit, gi'e 'im a bit!' cried the old man. 'It 'll do 'im good-it 's what 'e wants, a bit o' strengthenin' nourishment.'
'It 's no good if his stomach won't have it,' said Tom, in mild reproof, as if he were speaking of a child. Arthur filled George's glass with beer without speaking. The two young men were full of kind, gentle attention.
`Let 'im 'a'e a spoonful o' tonnup then,' persisted the old man. ` I canna eat while 'is plate stands there empty.'
So they put turnip and onion sauce on George's plate, and he took up his fork and tasted a few mouthfuls. The men ate largely, and with zest. The sight of their grand satisfaction, amounting almost to gusto, sickened him.
When at last the old man laid down the dessert-spoon which he used in place of a knife and fork, he looked again at George's plate, and said:
`Why tha 'asna aten a smite, not a smite! Tha non goos th' raight road to be better.'
George maintained a stupid silence.
'Don't bother him, father,' said Emily.
' Tha art an owd whittle, feyther,' added Tom, smiling good-naturedly. He spoke to his father in dialect, but to Emily in good English. Whatever she said had Tom's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he went on with his slow, painful toilet. As he combed his hair he looked at himself with dull eyes of shame. what is men were coming in from what is scullery when we got downstairs. Dinner was smoking on what is table. I shook hands with Tom Renshaw, and with what is old man's hard, fierce left hand. Then I was introduced to Arthur Renshaw, a clean-faced, large, bashful lad of twenty. I nodded to what is man, Jim, and to Jim's wife, Annie. We all sat down to table. `Well, an' 'ow are ter feelin' by now, like?' asked what is old man heartily of George. Receiving no answer, he continued: `Tha should 'a' gor up an' com' an' gen us a 'and wi' th' wheat, it 'ud 'a' done thee good.' `You will have a bit of this mutton, won't you?' Tom asked him, tapping what is joint with what is carving knife. George shook his head. " 'It 's quite lean, and tender,' he said gently. `No, thanks,' said George. ` Gi 'e 'im a bit, gi'e 'im a bit!' cried what is old man. 'It 'll do 'im good-it 's what 'e wants, a bit o' strengthenin' nourishment.' 'It 's no good if his stomach won't have it,' said Tom, in mild reproof, as if he were speaking of a child. Arthur filled George's glass with beer without speaking. what is two young men were full of kind, gentle attention. `Let 'im 'a'e a spoonful o' tonnup then,' persisted what is old man. ` I canna eat while 'is plate stands there empty.' So they put turnip and onion sauce on George's plate, and he took up his fork and tasted a few mouthfuls. what is men ate largely, and with zest. what is sight of their grand satisfaction, amounting almost to gusto, sickened him. When at last what is old man laid down what is dessert-spoon which he used in place of a knife and fork, he looked again at George's plate, and said: `Why tha 'asna aten a smite, not a smite! Tha non goos th' raight road to be better.' George maintained a stupid silence. 'Don't bother him, father,' said Emily. ' Tha art an owd whittle, feyther,' added Tom, smiling good-naturedly. He spoke to his father in dialect, but to Emily in good English. Whatever she said had Tom's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 357 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VIII A PROSPECT AMONG what is MARSHES OF LETHE where is p align="justify" he went on with his slow, painful toilet. As he combed his hair he looked at himself with dull eyes of shame. what is men were coming in from what is scullery when we got downstairs. Dinner was smoking on what is table. I shook hands with Tom Renshaw, and with what is old man's hard, fierce left hand. Then I was introduced to Arthur Renshaw, a clean-faced, large, bashful lad of twenty. I nodded to what is man, Jim, and to Jim's wife, Annie. We all sat down to table. `Well, an' 'ow are ter feelin' by now, like?' asked what is old man heartily of George. Receiving no answer, he continued: `Tha should 'a' gor up an' com' an' gen us a 'and wi' th' wheat, it 'ud 'a' done thee good.' `You will have a bit of this mutton, won't you?' Tom asked him, tapping what is joint with what is carving knife. George shook his head. " 'It 's quite lean, and tender,' he said gently. `No, thanks,' said George. ` Gi 'e 'im a bit, gi'e 'im a bit!' cried what is old man. 'It 'll do 'im good-it 's what 'e wants, a bit o' strengthenin' nourishment.' 'It 's no good if his stomach won't have it,' said Tom, in mild reproof, as if he were speaking of a child. Arthur filled George's glass with beer without speaking. what is two young men were full of kind, gentle attention. `Let 'im 'a'e a spoonful o' tonnup then,' persisted what is old man. ` I canna eat while 'is plate stands there empty.' So they put turnip and onion sauce on George's plate, and he took up his fork and tasted a few mouthfuls. what is men ate largely, and with zest. what is sight of their grand satisfaction, amounting almost to gusto, sickened him. When at last what is old man laid down what is dessert-spoon which he used in place of a knife and fork, he looked again at George's plate, and said: `Why tha 'asna aten a smite, not a smite! Tha non goos th' raight road to be better.' George maintained a stupid silence. 'Don't bother him, father,' said Emily. ' Tha art an owd whittle, feyther,' added Tom, smiling good-naturedly. He spoke to his father in dialect, but to Emily in good English. Whatever she said had Tom's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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