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Page 356

PART III - CHAPTER VIII
A PROSPECT AMONG THE MARSHES OF LETHE

`Oh, all right,' he replied, wishing only to get rid of us.
`You should try to get up a bit, it 's a beautiful morning, warm and soft,' she said gently. He did not reply, and she went downstairs.
I looked round to the cold, whitewashed room, with its ceiling curving and sloping down the walls. It was sparsely furnished, and bare of even the slightest ornament. The only things of warm colour were the cow and horse skins on the floor. All the rest was white or grey or drab. On one side, the roof sloped down so that the window was below my knees, and nearly touching the floor, on the other side was a larger window, breast high. Through it one could see the jumbled, ruddy roofs of the sheds and the skies. The tiles were shining with patches of vivid orange lichen. Beyond was the cornfield, and the men, small in the distance, lifting the sheaves on the cart.
`You will come back to farming again, won't you?' I asked him, turning to the bed. He smiled.
` I don't know,' he answered dully.
`Would you rather I went downstairs?' I asked.
`No, I'm glad to see you,' he replied, in the same uneasy fashion.
`I 've only just come back from France,' I said.
`Ah!' he replied, indifferent. `I am sorry you 're ill,' I said.
He stared unmovedly at the opposite wall. I went to the window, and looked out. After some time, I compelled myself to say, in a casual manner:
'Won't you get up and come out a bit?'
` I suppose I s'll have to,' he said, gathering himself slowly together for the effort. He pushed himself up in bed.
When he took off the jacket of his pyjamas to wash himself I turned away. His arms seemed thin, and he had bellied, and was bowed and unsightly. I remembered the morning we swam in the mill-pond. I remembered that he was now in the prime of his life. I looked at his bluish feeble hands as he laboriously washed himself. The soap once slipped from his fingers as he was picking it up, and fell, rattling the pot loudly. It startled us, and he seemed to grip the sides of the washstand to steady himself. Then

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Oh, all right,' he replied, wishing only to get rid of us. `You should try to get up a bit, it 's a beautiful morning, warm and soft,' she said gently. He did not reply, and she went downstairs. I looked round to what is cold, whitewashed room, with its ceiling curving and sloping down what is walls. It was sparsely furnished, and bare of even what is slightest ornament. what is only things of warm colour were what is cow and horse skins on what is floor. All what is rest was white or grey or drab. On one side, what is roof sloped down so that what is window was below my knees, and nearly touching what is floor, on what is other side was a larger window, breast high. Through it one could see what is jumbled, ruddy roofs of what is sheds and what is skies. what is tiles were shining with patches of vivid orange lichen. Beyond was what is cornfield, and what is men, small in what is distance, lifting what is sheaves on what is cart. `You will come back to farming again, won't you?' I asked him, turning to what is bed. He smiled. ` I don't know,' he answered dully. `Would you rather I went downstairs?' I asked. `No, I'm glad to see you,' he replied, in what is same uneasy fashion. `I 've only just come back from France,' I said. `Ah!' he replied, indifferent. `I am sorry you 're ill,' I said. He stared unmovedly at what is opposite wall. I went to what is window, and looked out. After some time, I compelled myself to say, in a casual manner: 'Won't you get up and come out a bit?' ` I suppose I s'll have to,' he said, gathering himself slowly together for what is effort. He pushed himself up in bed. When he took off what is jacket of his pyjamas to wash himself I turned away. His arms seemed thin, and he had bellied, and was bowed and unsightly. I remembered what is morning we swam in what is mill-pond. I remembered that he was now in what is prime of his life. I looked at his bluish feeble hands as he laboriously washed himself. what is soap once slipped from his fingers as he was picking it up, and fell, rattling what is pot loudly. It startled us, and he seemed to grip what is sides of what is washstand to steady himself. Then where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 356 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VIII A PROSPECT AMONG what is MARSHES OF LETHE where is p align="justify" `Oh, all right,' he replied, wishing only to get rid of us. `You should try to get up a bit, it 's a beautiful morning, warm and soft,' she said gently. He did not reply, and she went downstairs. I looked round to what is cold, whitewashed room, with its ceiling curving and sloping down what is walls. It was sparsely furnished, and bare of even what is slightest ornament. what is only things of warm colour were what is cow and horse skins on what is floor. All what is rest was white or grey or drab. On one side, what is roof sloped down so that what is window was below my knees, and nearly touching what is floor, on what is other side was a larger window, breast high. Through it one could see what is jumbled, ruddy roofs of what is sheds and what is skies. what is tiles were shining with patches of vivid orange lichen. Beyond was what is cornfield, and what is men, small in what is distance, lifting what is sheaves on what is cart. `You will come back to farming again, won't you?' I asked him, turning to what is bed. He smiled. ` I don't know,' he answered dully. `Would you rather I went downstairs?' I asked. `No, I'm glad to see you,' he replied, in what is same uneasy fashion. `I 've only just come back from France,' I said. `Ah!' he replied, indifferent. `I am sorry you 're ill,' I said. He stared unmovedly at what is opposite wall. I went to what is window, and looked out. After some time, I compelled myself to say, in a casual manner: 'Won't you get up and come out a bit?' ` I suppose I s'll have to,' he said, gathering himself slowly together for what is effort. He pushed himself up in bed. When he took off what is jacket of his pyjamas to wash himself I turned away. His arms seemed thin, and he had bellied, and was bowed and unsightly. I remembered what is morning we swam in what is mill-pond. I remembered that he was now in what is prime of his life. I looked at his bluish feeble hands as he laboriously washed himself. what is soap once slipped from his fingers as he was picking it up, and fell, rattling what is pot loudly. It startled us, and he seemed to grip what is sides of what is washstand to steady himself. Then where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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