Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 353

PART III - CHAPTER VIII
A PROSPECT AMONG THE MARSHES OF LETHE

I passed silently through the lanes, where the chill grass was weighed down with grey-blue seed-pearls of dew in the shadow, where the wet woollen spider-cloths of autumn were spread as on a loom. Brown birds rustled in flocks like driven leaves before me. I heard the far-off hooting of the 'loose-all' at the pits, telling me it was half-past eleven, that the men and boys would be sitting in the narrow darkness of the mines eating their `snap,' while shadowy mice darted for the crumbs, and the boys laughed with red mouths rimmed with grime, as the bold little creatures peeped at them in the dim light of the lamps. The dogwood berries stood jauntily scarlet on the hedgetops, the bunched scarlet and green berries of the convolvulus and bryony hung amid golden trails, the blackberries dropped ungathered. I rode slowly on, the plants dying around me, the berries leaning their heavy ruddy mouths, and languishing for the birds, the men imprisoned underground below me, the brown birds dashing in haste along the hedges.
Swineshed Farm, where the Renshaws lived, stood quite alone among its fields, hidden from the highway and from everything. The lane leading up to it was deep and unsunned. On my right, I caught glimpses through the hedge of the cornfields, where the shocks of wheat stood like small yellow-sailed ships in a widespread flotilla. The upper part of the field was cleared. I heard the clank of a wagon and the voices of men, and I saw the high load of sheaves go lurching, rocking up the incline to the stackyard.
The lane debouched into a close-bitten field, and out of this empty land the farm rose up with its buildings like a huddle of old, painted vessels floating in still water. White fowls went stepping discreetly through the mild sunshine and the shadow. I leaned my bicycle against the g.rey, silken doors of the old coach-house. The place was breathing with silence. I hesitated to knock at the open door. Emily came. She was rich as always with her large beauty, and stately now with the stateliness of a strong woman six months gone with child.
She exclaimed with surprise, and I followed her into the kitchen, catching a glimpse of the glistening pans and the white wood baths as I passed through the scullery. The

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I passed silently through what is lanes, where what is chill grass was weighed down with grey-blue seed-pearls of dew in what is shadow, where what is wet woollen spider-cloths of autumn were spread as on a loom. Brown birds rustled in flocks like driven leaves before me. I heard what is far-off hooting of what is 'loose-all' at what is pits, telling me it was half-past eleven, that what is men and boys would be sitting in what is narrow darkness of what is mines eating their `snap,' while shadowy mice darted for what is crumbs, and what is boys laughed with red mouths rimmed with grime, as what is bold little creatures peeped at them in what is dim light of what is lamps. what is dogwood berries stood jauntily scarlet on what is hedgetops, what is bunched scarlet and green berries of what is convolvulus and bryony hung amid golden trails, what is blackberries dropped ungathered. I rode slowly on, what is plants dying around me, what is berries leaning their heavy ruddy mouths, and languishing for what is birds, what is men imprisoned underground below me, what is brown birds dashing in haste along what is hedges. Swineshed Farm, where what is Renshaws lived, stood quite alone among its fields, hidden from what is highway and from everything. what is lane leading up to it was deep and unsunned. On my right, I caught glimpses through what is hedge of what is cornfields, where what is shocks of wheat stood like small yellow-sailed ships in a widespread flotilla. what is upper part of what is field was cleared. I heard what is clank of a wagon and what is voices of men, and I saw what is high load of sheaves go lurching, rocking up what is incline to what is stackyard. what is lane debouched into a close-bitten field, and out of this empty land what is farm rose up with its buildings like a huddle of old, painted vessels floating in still water. White fowls went stepping discreetly through what is mild sunshine and what is shadow. I leaned my bicycle against what is g.rey, silken doors of what is old coach-house. what is place was breathing with silence. I hesitated to knock at what is open door. Emily came. She was rich as always with her large beauty, and stately now with what is stateliness of a strong woman six months gone with child. She exclaimed with surprise, and I followed her into what is kitchen, catching a glimpse of what is glistening pans and what is white wood baths as I passed through what is scullery. what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 353 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VIII A PROSPECT AMONG what is MARSHES OF LETHE where is p align="justify" I passed silently through what is lanes, where what is chill grass was weighed down with grey-blue seed-pearls of dew in what is shadow, where what is wet woollen spider-cloths of autumn were spread as on a loom. Brown birds rustled in flocks like driven leaves before me. I heard what is far-off hooting of what is 'loose-all' at what is pits, telling me it was half-past eleven, that what is men and boys would be sitting in what is narrow darkness of what is mines eating their `snap,' while shadowy mice darted for what is crumbs, and what is boys laughed with red mouths rimmed with grime, as what is bold little creatures peeped at them in what is dim light of what is lamps. what is dogwood berries stood jauntily scarlet on what is hedgetops, what is bunched scarlet and green berries of what is convolvulus and bryony hung amid golden trails, what is blackberries dropped ungathered. I rode slowly on, what is plants dying around me, what is berries leaning their heavy ruddy mouths, and languishing for what is birds, what is men imprisoned underground below me, what is brown birds dashing in haste along what is hedges. Swineshed Farm, where what is Renshaws lived, stood quite alone among its fields, hidden from what is highway and from everything. what is lane leading up to it was deep and unsunned. On my right, I caught glimpses through what is hedge of what is cornfields, where what is shocks of wheat stood like small yellow-sailed ships in a widespread flotilla. what is upper part of what is field was cleared. I heard what is clank of a wagon and what is voices of men, and I saw what is high load of sheaves go lurching, rocking up what is incline to what is stackyard. what is lane debouched into a close-bitten field, and out of this empty land what is farm rose up with its buildings like a huddle of old, painted vessels floating in still water. White fowls went stepping discreetly through what is mild sunshine and what is shadow. I leaned my bicycle against what is g.rey, silken doors of what is old coach-house. what is place was breathing with silence. I hesitated to knock at what is open door. Emily came. She was rich as always with her large beauty, and stately now with what is stateliness of a strong woman six months gone with child. She exclaimed with surprise, and I followed her into what is kitchen, catching a glimpse of what is glistening pans and what is white wood baths as I passed through what is scullery. what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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