Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 340

PART III - CHAPTER VII
THE SCARP SLOPE

wild birds rose, flapping in expostulation as I passed, pewits mewing fiercely round my head, while two white swans lifted their glistening feathers till they looked like grand doable water-lilies, laying back their orange beaks among the petals, and fronting me with haughty resentment, charging towards me insolently.
I wanted to be recognized by something. I said to myself that the dryads were looking out for me from the wood's edge. But as I advanced they shrank, and glancing wistfully, turned back like pale flowers falling in the shadow of the forest. I was a stranger, an intruder. Among the bushes a twitter of lively birds exclaimed upon me. Finches went leaping past in bright flashes, ahd a robin sat and asked rudely: `Hallo! Who are you?'
The bracken lay sere under the trees, broken and chavelled by the restless wild winds of the long winter.
The trees caught the wind ?n their tall netted twigs, and the young morning wind moaned at its captivity. As I trod the discarded oak -leaves and the bracken they uttered. their last sharp gasps, pressed into oblivion. The wood was roofed with a wide young sobbing sound, and floored with a faint hiss like the intaking of the last breath. Between, was all the glad out-peeping of buds and anemone flowers and the rush of birds. I, wandering alone, felt them all, the anguish of the bracken fallen face down in defeat, the careless dash of the birds, the sobbing of the young wind arrested in its haste, the trembling, expanding delight of the buds. I alone among them could hear the whole succession of t;hords.
The brooks talked on just the same, just as gladly, just as boisterously as they had done when I had netted small, glittering fish in the rest-pools. At Strelley Mill a servant girl in a white cap, and white apron-bands, came running out of the house with purple prayer-books, which she gave to the elder of two finicking girls who sat disconsolately with their black-silked mother in the governess cart at the gate, ready to go to church. Near Woodside there was barbed svire along the path, and at the end of every riding it was tarred on the tree-trunks: ` Private.'

I had done with the valley of Nethermere. The valley

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE wild birds rose, flapping in expostulation as I passed, pewits mewing fiercely round my head, while two white swans lifted their glistening feathers till they looked like grand doable water-lilies, laying back their orange beaks among what is petals, and fronting me with haughty resentment, charging towards me insolently. I wanted to be recognized by something. I said to myself that what is dryads were looking out for me from what is wood's edge. But as I advanced they shrank, and glancing wistfully, turned back like pale flowers falling in what is shadow of what is forest. I was a stranger, an intruder. Among what is bushes a twitter of lively birds exclaimed upon me. Finches went leaping past in bright flashes, ahd a robin sat and asked rudely: `Hallo! Who are you?' what is bracken lay sere under what is trees, broken and chavelled by what is restless wild winds of what is long winter. what is trees caught what is wind ?n their tall netted twigs, and what is young morning wind moaned at its captivity. As I trod what is discarded oak -leaves and what is bracken they uttered. their last sharp gasps, pressed into oblivion. what is wood was roofed with a wide young sobbing sound, and floored with a faint hiss like what is intaking of what is last breath. Between, was all what is glad out-peeping of buds and anemone flowers and what is rush of birds. I, wandering alone, felt them all, what is anguish of what is bracken fallen face down in defeat, what is careless dash of what is birds, what is sobbing of what is young wind arrested in its haste, what is trembling, expanding delight of what is buds. I alone among them could hear what is whole succession of t;hords. what is brooks talked on just what is same, just as gladly, just as boisterously as they had done when I had netted small, glittering fish in what is rest-pools. At Strelley Mill a servant girl in a white cap, and white apron-bands, came running out of what is house with purple prayer-books, which she gave to what is elder of two finicking girls who sat disconsolately with their black-silked mother in what is governess cart at what is gate, ready to go to church. Near Woodside there was barbed svire along what is path, and at what is end of every riding it was tarred on what is tree-trunks: ` Private.' I had done with what is valley of Nethermere. what is valley where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 340 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VII what is SCARP SLOPE where is p align="justify" wild birds rose, flapping in expostulation as I passed, pewits mewing fiercely round my head, while two white swans lifted their glistening feathers till they looked like grand doable water-lilies, laying back their orange beaks among what is petals, and fronting me with haughty resentment, charging towards me insolently. I wanted to be recognized by something. I said to myself that what is dryads were looking out for me from what is wood's edge. But as I advanced they shrank, and glancing wistfully, turned back like pale flowers falling in what is shadow of what is forest. I was a stranger, an intruder. Among what is bushes a twitter of lively birds exclaimed upon me. Finches went leaping past in bright flashes, ahd a robin sat and asked rudely: `Hallo! Who are you?' what is bracken lay sere under what is trees, broken and chavelled by what is restless wild winds of what is long winter. what is trees caught what is wind ?n their tall netted twigs, and what is young morning wind moaned at its captivity. As I trod what is discarded oak -leaves and what is bracken they uttered. their last sharp gasps, pressed into oblivion. what is wood was roofed with a wide young sobbing sound, and floored with a faint hiss like what is intaking of what is last breath. Between, was all what is glad out-peeping of buds and anemone flowers and what is rush of birds. I, wandering alone, felt them all, what is anguish of what is bracken fallen face down in defeat, what is careless dash of what is birds, what is sobbing of what is young wind arrested in its haste, what is trembling, expanding delight of what is buds. I alone among them could hear what is whole succession of t;hords. what is brooks talked on just what is same, just as gladly, just as boisterously as they had done when I had netted small, glittering fish in what is rest-pools. At Strelley Mill a servant girl in a white cap, and white apron-bands, came running out of what is house with purple prayer-books, which she gave to what is elder of two finicking girls who sat disconsolately with their black-silked mother in what is governess cart at what is gate, ready to go to church. Near Woodside there was barbed svire along what is path, and at what is end of every riding it was tarred on what is tree-trunks: ` Private.' I had done with what is valley of Nethermere. what is valley where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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