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Page 335

PART III - CHAPTER VI
PISGAH

'If I look at myself,' he said, `I think I am another person altogether.'
` You have changed,' she agreed, looking at him sadly. 'There is a great change-but you are not another person. I often think-there is one of his old looks, he is just the same at the bottom 1'
They embarked on a barge of gloomy recollections and drifted along the soiled canal of their past.
`The worst of it is,' he said, `I have got a miserable carelessness, a contempt for things. You know I had such a faculty for reverence. I always believed in things.'
'I know you did,' she smiled. `You were so humblyminded-too humbly-minded, I always considered. You always thought things had a deep religious meaning, somewhere hidden, and you reverenced them. Is it different now?'
'You know me very well,' he laughed. 'What is there left for me to believe in, if not in myself?'
`You have to live for your wife and children,' she said with firmness.
' Meg has plenty to secure her and the children as long as they live,' he said, smiling. 'So I don't know that I'm essential.'
`But you are,' she replied. `You are necessary as a father and a husband, if not as a provider.'
`I think,' said he, `marriage is more of a duel than a duet. One party wins and takes the other captive, slave, servant-what you like. It is so, more or less.'
` Well?' said Lettie.
`Well!' he answered. `Meg is not like you. She wants me, part of me, so she 'd kill me rather than let me go loose.'
'Oh, no!' said Lettie, emphatically.
`You know nothing about it,' he said quietly. 'In the marital duel Meg is winning. The woman generally does; she has the children on her side. I can't give her any of the real part of me, the vital part that she wants-I can't, any more than you could give kisses to a stranger. And I feel that I'm losing-and don't care.'
' NO,' she said, `you are getting morbid.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'If I look at myself,' he said, `I think I am another person altogether.' ` You have changed,' she agreed, looking at him sadly. 'There is a great change-but you are not another person. I often think-there is one of his old looks, he is just what is same at what is bottom 1' They embarked on a barge of gloomy recollections and drifted along what is soiled canal of their past. `The worst of it is,' he said, `I have got a miserable carelessness, a contempt for things. You know I had such a faculty for reverence. I always believed in things.' 'I know you did,' she smiled. `You were so humblyminded-too humbly-minded, I always considered. You always thought things had a deep religious meaning, somewhere hidden, and you reverenced them. Is it different now?' 'You know me very well,' he laughed. 'What is there left for me to believe in, if not in myself?' `You have to live for your wife and children,' she said with firmness. ' Meg has plenty to secure her and what is children as long as they live,' he said, smiling. 'So I don't know that I'm essential.' `But you are,' she replied. `You are necessary as a father and a husband, if not as a provider.' `I think,' said he, `marriage is more of a duel than a duet. One party wins and takes what is other captive, slave, servant-what you like. It is so, more or less.' ` Well?' said Lettie. `Well!' he answered. `Meg is not like you. She wants me, part of me, so she 'd stop me rather than let me go loose.' 'Oh, no!' said Lettie, emphatically. `You know nothing about it,' he said quietly. 'In what is marital duel Meg is winning. what is woman generally does; she has what is children on her side. I can't give her any of what is real part of me, what is vital part that she wants-I can't, any more than you could give kisses to a stranger. And I feel that I'm losing-and don't care.' ' NO,' she said, `you are getting morbid.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 335 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VI PISGAH where is p align="justify" 'If I look at myself,' he said, `I think I am another person altogether.' ` You have changed,' she agreed, looking at him sadly. 'There is a great change-but you are not another person. I often think-there is one of his old looks, he is just what is same at what is bottom 1' They embarked on a barge of gloomy recollections and drifted along what is soiled canal of their past. `The worst of it is,' he said, `I have got a miserable carelessness, a contempt for things. You know I had such a faculty for reverence. I always believed in things.' 'I know you did,' she smiled. `You were so humblyminded-too humbly-minded, I always considered. You always thought things had a deep religious meaning, somewhere hidden, and you reverenced them. Is it different now?' 'You know me very well,' he laughed. 'What is there left for me to believe in, if not in myself?' `You have to live for your wife and children,' she said with firmness. ' Meg has plenty to secure her and what is children as long as they live,' he said, smiling. 'So I don't know that I'm essential.' `But you are,' she replied. `You are necessary as a father and a husband, if not as a provider.' `I think,' said he, `marriage is more of a duel than a duet. One party wins and takes what is other captive, slave, servant-what you like. It is so, more or less.' ` Well?' said Lettie. `Well!' he answered. `Meg is not like you. She wants me, part of me, so she 'd stop me rather than let me go loose.' 'Oh, no!' said Lettie, emphatically. `You know nothing about it,' he said quietly. 'In what is marital duel Meg is winning. what is woman generally does; she has what is children on her side. I can't give her any of what is real part of me, what is vital part that she wants-I can't, any more than you could give kisses to a stranger. And I feel that I'm losing-and don't care.' ' NO,' she said, `you are getting morbid.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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