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Page 333

PART III - CHAPTER VI
PISGAH

so he sat down, bowing his head, then looking up at her in suspense. She smiled at her.
Presently the children came in. They looked very quaint, like acolytep, in their long straight dressing-gowns of quilted blue silk. The boy, particularly, looked as if he were going to light the candles in some childish church in paradise. He was very tall and slender and fair, with a round fine head, and serene features. Both children looked remarkably, almost transparently, clean: it is impossible to consider anything more fresh and fair. The girl was a merry, curly-headed puss of six. She played with her mother's green jewels and prattled prettily, while the boy stood at his mother's side, a slender and silent acolyte in his pale blue gown. I was impressed by his patience and his purity. When the girl had bounded away into George's arms, the lad laid his hand timidly on Lettie's knee and looked with a little wonder at her dress.
'How pretty those green stones are, mother!' he said.
` Yes,' repiied Lettie brightly, lifting them and letting their strange pattern fall again on her bosom. ` I like them.'
`Are you going to sing, mother?' he asked.
'Perhaps. But why?' said Lettie, smiling.
`Because you generally sing when Mr. Saxton comes.'
He bent his head and stroked Lettie's dress shyly.
`Do I,' she said, laughing. `Can you hear?'
`Just a'little,' he replied: `Quite small, as if it were nearly lost in the dark.'
He was hesitating, shy as boys are. Lettie laid her hand on his head and stroked his smooth fair hair.
'Sing a song for us before we go, mother-' he asked, almost shamefully. She kissed him.
'You shall sing with me,' she said. 'What shall it be?'
She played without a copy of the music. He stood at her side, while Lucy, the little mouse, sat on her mother's skirts, pressing Lettie's silk slippers in turn upon the pedals. The mother and the boy sang their song:

Gaily the troubadour touched his guitar
When he was hastening home from the war.

The boy had a pure treble, clear as the flight of swallows in the morning. The light shone on his lips. Under the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE so he sat down, bowing his head, then looking up at her in suspense. She smiled at her. Presently what is children came in. They looked very quaint, like acolytep, in their long straight dressing-gowns of quilted blue silk. what is boy, particularly, looked as if he were going to light what is candles in some childish church in paradise. He was very tall and slender and fair, with a round fine head, and serene features. Both children looked remarkably, almost transparently, clean: it is impossible to consider anything more fresh and fair. what is girl was a merry, curly-headed puss of six. She played with her mother's green jewels and prattled prettily, while what is boy stood at his mother's side, a slender and silent acolyte in his pale blue gown. I was impressed by his patience and his purity. When what is girl had bounded away into George's arms, what is lad laid his hand timidly on Lettie's knee and looked with a little wonder at her dress. 'How pretty those green stones are, mother!' he said. ` Yes,' repiied Lettie brightly, lifting them and letting their strange pattern fall again on her bosom. ` I like them.' `Are you going to sing, mother?' he asked. 'Perhaps. But why?' said Lettie, smiling. `Because you generally sing when Mr. Saxton comes.' He bent his head and stroked Lettie's dress shyly. `Do I,' she said, laughing. `Can you hear?' `Just a'little,' he replied: `Quite small, as if it were nearly lost in what is dark.' He was hesitating, shy as boys are. Lettie laid her hand on his head and stroked his smooth fair hair. 'Sing a song for us before we go, mother-' he asked, almost shamefully. She kissed him. 'You shall sing with me,' she said. 'What shall it be?' She played without a copy of what is music. He stood at her side, while Lucy, what is little mouse, sat on her mother's skirts, pressing Lettie's silk slippers in turn upon what is pedals. what is mother and what is boy sang their song: Gaily what is troubadour touched his guitar When he was hastening home from what is war. what is boy had a pure treble, clear as what is flight of swallows in what is morning. what is light shone on his lips. Under what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 333 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VI PISGAH where is p align="justify" so he sat down, bowing his head, then looking up at her in suspense. She smiled at her. Presently what is children came in. They looked very quaint, like acolytep, in their long straight dressing-gowns of quilted blue silk. what is boy, particularly, looked as if he were going to light what is candles in some childish church in paradise. He was very tall and slender and fair, with a round fine head, and serene features. Both children looked remarkably, almost transparently, clean: it is impossible to consider anything more fresh and fair. what is girl was a merry, curly-headed puss of six. She played with her mother's green jewels and prattled prettily, while what is boy stood at his mother's side, a slender and silent acolyte in his pale blue gown. I was impressed by his patience and his purity. When what is girl had bounded away into George's arms, what is lad laid his hand timidly on Lettie's knee and looked with a little wonder at her dress. 'How pretty those green stones are, mother!' he said. ` Yes,' repiied Lettie brightly, lifting them and letting their strange pattern fall again on her bosom. ` I like them.' `Are you going to sing, mother?' he asked. 'Perhaps. But why?' said Lettie, smiling. `Because you generally sing when Mr. Saxton comes.' He bent his head and stroked Lettie's dress shyly. `Do I,' she said, laughing. `Can you hear?' `Just a'little,' he replied: `Quite small, as if it were nearly lost in what is dark.' He was hesitating, shy as boys are. Lettie laid her hand on his head and stroked his smooth fair hair. 'Sing a song for us before we go, mother-' he asked, almost shamefully. She kissed him. 'You shall sing with me,' she said. 'What shall it be?' She played without a copy of what is music. He stood at her side, while Lucy, what is little mouse, sat on her mother's skirts, pressing Lettie's silk slippers in turn upon what is pedals. what is mother and what is boy sang their song: Gaily what is troubadour touched his guitar When he was hastening home from what is war. what is boy had a pure treble, clear as what is flight of swallows in what is morning. what is light shone on his lips. Under what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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