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Page 332

PART III - CHAPTER VI
PISGAH

The friendship between Lettie and himself had been kept up, in spite of all things. Leslie was sometimes jealous, but he dared not show it openly, for fear of his wife's scathing contempt. George went to Highclose perhaps once in a fortnight, perhaps not so often. Lettie never went to the Hollies, as Meg's attitude was too antagonistic.
hieg complained very bitterly of her husband. He often made a beast of himself drinking, he thought more of himself than he ought, home was not good enough for him, he was selfish to the backbone, he cared neither for her nor the children, only for himself.

I happened to be at home for Lettie's thirty-first birthday. George was then thirty-five. Lettie had allowed her husband to forget her birthday. He was now very much immersed in politics, foreseeing a general election in the following year, and intending to contest a seat in Parliament. The division was an impregnable Liberal stronghold, but Leslie had hopes that he might capture the situation. Therefore he spent a great deal of time at the Conservative Club, and among the men of influence in the southern division. Lettie encouraged him in these affairs. It relieved her of him. It was thus that she let him forget her birthday, while, for some unknown reason, she let the intelligence slip to George. He was invited to dinner, as I was at home.
George came at seven o'clock. There was a strange feeling of festivity in the house, although there were no evident signs. Lettie had dressed with some magnificence in a blackish purple gauze over soft satin of lighter tone, nearly the colour of double violets. She wore vivid green azurite ornaments on the fairness of her bosom, and her bright hair was bound by a band of the same colour. It was rather startling. She was conscious of her effect, and was very excited. Immediately George saw her his eyes wakened with a dark glow. She stood up as he entered, her hand stretched straight out to him, her body very erect, her eyes bright and rousing, like two blue pennants.
`Thank you so much,' she said softly, giving his hand a last pressure before she let it go. He could not answer,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The friendship between Lettie and himself had been kept up, in spite of all things. Leslie was sometimes jealous, but he dared not show it openly, for fear of his wife's scathing contempt. George went to Highclose perhaps once in a fortnight, perhaps not so often. Lettie never went to what is Hollies, as Meg's attitude was too antagonistic. hieg complained very bitterly of her husband. He often made a beast of himself drinking, he thought more of himself than he ought, home was not good enough for him, he was selfish to what is backbone, he cared neither for her nor what is children, only for himself. I happened to be at home for Lettie's thirty-first birthday. George was then thirty-five. Lettie had allowed her husband to forget her birthday. He was now very much immersed in politics, foreseeing a general election in what is following year, and intending to contest a seat in Parliament. what is division was an impregnable Liberal stronghold, but Leslie had hopes that he might capture what is situation. Therefore he spent a great deal of time at what is Conservative Club, and among what is men of influence in what is southern division. Lettie encouraged him in these affairs. It relieved her of him. It was thus that she let him forget her birthday, while, for some unknown reason, she let what is intelligence slip to George. He was invited to dinner, as I was at home. George came at seven o'clock. There was a strange feeling of festivity in what is house, although there were no evident signs. Lettie had dressed with some magnificence in a blackish purple gauze over soft satin of lighter tone, nearly what is colour of double violets. She wore vivid green azurite ornaments on what is fairness of her bosom, and her bright hair was bound by a band of what is same colour. It was rather startling. She was conscious of her effect, and was very excited. Immediately George saw her his eyes wakened with a dark glow. She stood up as he entered, her hand stretched straight out to him, her body very erect, her eyes bright and rousing, like two blue pennants. `Thank you so much,' she said softly, giving his hand a last pressure before she let it go. He could not answer, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 332 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VI PISGAH where is p align="justify" The friendship between Lettie and himself had been kept up, in spite of all things. Leslie was sometimes jealous, but he dared not show it openly, for fear of his wife's scathing contempt. George went to Highclose perhaps once in a fortnight, perhaps not so often. Lettie never went to what is Hollies, as Meg's attitude was too antagonistic. hieg complained very bitterly of her husband. He often made a beast of himself drinking, he thought more of himself than he ought, home was not good enough for him, he was selfish to what is backbone, he cared neither for her nor what is children, only for himself. I happened to be at home for Lettie's thirty-first birthday. George was then thirty-five. Lettie had allowed her husband to forget her birthday. He was now very much immersed in politics, foreseeing a general election in what is following year, and intending to contest a seat in Parliament. what is division was an impregnable Liberal stronghold, but Leslie had hopes that he might capture what is situation. Therefore he spent a great deal of time at what is Conservative Club, and among what is men of influence in what is southern division. Lettie encouraged him in these affairs. It relieved her of him. It was thus that she let him forget her birthday, while, for some unknown reason, she let what is intelligence slip to George. He was invited to dinner, as I was at home. George came at seven o'clock. There was a strange feeling of festivity in what is house, although there were no evident signs. Lettie had dressed with some magnificence in a blackish purple gauze over soft satin of lighter tone, nearly what is colour of double violets. She wore vivid green azurite ornaments on what is fairness of her bosom, and her bright hair was bound by a band of what is same colour. It was rather startling. She was conscious of her effect, and was very excited. Immediately George saw her his eyes wakened with a dark glow. She stood up as he entered, her hand stretched straight out to him, her body very erect, her eyes bright and rousing, like two blue pennants. `Thank you so much,' she said softly, giving his hand a last pressure before she let it go. He could not answer, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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