Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 329

PART III - CHAPTER VI
PISGAH

'We can't grdw consumption-proof in a generation, nor can we grow poverty-proof.'
`We can begin to take active measures,' he replied contemptuously.
'We can all go into a sanatorium and live miserably and dejectedly warding off death,' she said, `but life is full of goodliness for all that.'
'It is fuller of misery,' he said.
Nevertheless, she had shaken him. She still kept her astonishing power of influencing his opinions. All his passion, and heat, and rude speech, analysed out, was only his terror at her threatening of his life-interest.
She was rather piqued by his rough treatment of her, and by his contemptuous tone. Moreover, she could never quite let him be. She felt a driving force which impelled her almost against her will to interfere in his life. She invited him to dine with them at Highclose. He was now quite possible. He had, in the course of his business, been sufficiently in the company of gentlemen to be altogether coname il faut at a private dinner, and after dinner.
She wrote me concerning him occasionally:
George Saxton was here to dinner yesterday. He and Leslie have frightful battles over the nationalization of industries. George is rather more than a match for Leslie, which, in his secret heart, makes our friend gloriously proud. It is very amusing. I, of course, have to preserve the balance of power, and, of course, to bolster my husband's dignity. At a crucial, dangerous moment, when George is just going to wave his bloody sword and Leslie lies bleeding with rage, I step in and prick the victor under the heart with some little satire or some esoteric question, I raise Leslie and say his blood is luminous for the truth, and voaes void! Then I abate for the thousandth time Leslie's conservative crow, and I appeal once more to George-it is no use my arguing with him, he gets so angry-I make an abstruse appeal for all the wonderful, sad, and beautiful expressions on the countenance of life, expressions which he does not see or which he distorts by his oblique vision of socialism into grimaces-and there I am! I think I am something of a Machiavelli, but it is quite true, what I say. ...

Again she wrote :

We happened to be motoring from Derby on Sunday morning, and as we came to the top of the hill, we had to thread our way through quite a large crowd. I looked up, and whom should I see but our friend George, holding forth about the state endowment of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'We can't grdw consumption-proof in a generation, nor can we grow poverty-proof.' `We can begin to take active measures,' he replied contemptuously. 'We can all go into a sanatorium and live miserably and dejectedly warding off what time is it ,' she said, `but life is full of goodliness for all that.' 'It is fuller of misery,' he said. Nevertheless, she had shaken him. She still kept her astonishing power of influencing his opinions. All his passion, and heat, and rude speech, analysed out, was only his terror at her threatening of his life-interest. She was rather piqued by his rough treatment of her, and by his contemptuous tone. Moreover, she could never quite let him be. She felt a driving force which impelled her almost against her will to interfere in his life. She invited him to dine with them at Highclose. He was now quite possible. He had, in what is course of his business, been sufficiently in what is company of gentlemen to be altogether coname il faut at a private dinner, and after dinner. She wrote me concerning him occasionally: George Saxton was here to dinner yesterday. He and Leslie have frightful battles over what is nationalization of industries. George is rather more than a match for Leslie, which, in his secret heart, makes our friend gloriously proud. It is very amusing. I, of course, have to preserve what is balance of power, and, of course, to bolster my husband's dignity. At a crucial, dangerous moment, when George is just going to wave his bloody sword and Leslie lies bleeding with rage, I step in and prick what is victor under what is heart with some little satire or some esoteric question, I raise Leslie and say his blood is luminous for what is truth, and voaes void! Then I abate for what is thousandth time Leslie's conservative crow, and I appeal once more to George-it is no use my arguing with him, he gets so angry-I make an abstruse appeal for all what is wonderful, sad, and beautiful expressions on what is countenance of life, expressions which he does not see or which he distorts by his oblique vision of socialism into grimaces-and there I am! I think I am something of a Machiavelli, but it is quite true, what I say. ... Again she wrote : We happened to be motoring from Derby on Sunday morning, and as we came to what is top of what is hill, we had to thread our way through quite a large crowd. I looked up, and whom should I see but our friend George, holding forth about what is state endowment of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 329 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VI PISGAH where is p align="justify" 'We can't grdw consumption-proof in a generation, nor can we grow poverty-proof.' `We can begin to take active measures,' he replied contemptuously. 'We can all go into a sanatorium and live miserably and dejectedly warding off what time is it ,' she said, `but life is full of goodliness for all that.' 'It is fuller of misery,' he said. Nevertheless, she had shaken him. She still kept her astonishing power of influencing his opinions. All his passion, and heat, and rude speech, analysed out, was only his terror at her threatening of his life-interest. She was rather piqued by his rough treatment of her, and by his contemptuous tone. Moreover, she could never quite let him be. She felt a driving force which impelled her almost against her will to interfere in his life. She invited him to dine with them at Highclose. He was now quite possible. He had, in what is course of his business, been sufficiently in what is company of gentlemen to be altogether coname il faut at a private dinner, and after dinner. She wrote me concerning him occasionally: George Saxton was here to dinner yesterday. He and Leslie have frightful battles over what is nationalization of industries. George is rather more than a match for Leslie, which, in his secret heart, makes our friend gloriously proud. It is very amusing. I, of course, have to preserve what is balance of power, and, of course, to bolster my husband's dignity. At a crucial, dangerous moment, when George is just going to wave his bloody sword and Leslie lies bleeding with rage, I step in and prick what is victor under what is heart with some little satire or some esoteric question, I raise Leslie and say his blood is luminous for what is truth, and voaes void! Then I abate for what is thousandth time Leslie's conservative crow, and I appeal once more to George-it is no use my arguing with him, he gets so angry-I make an abstruse appeal for all what is wonderful, sad, and beautiful expressions on what is countenance of life, expressions which he does not see or which he distorts by his oblique vision of socialism into grimaces-and there I am! I think I am something of a Machiavelli, but it is quite true, what I say. ... Again she wrote : We happened to be motoring from Derby on Sunday morning, and as we came to what is top of what is hill, we had to thread our way through quite a large crowd. I looked up, and whom should I see but our friend George, holding forth about what is state endowment of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363