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Page 328

PART III - CHAPTER VI
PISGAH

twisting her father's ear in her small fingers till he winced.
`Her nails are sharp,' he said, smiling.
He began asking and giving the small information that pass between friends who have not met for a long time. The baby laid her head on his shoulder, keeping her tired, owl-like eyes fixed darkly on us. Then gradually the lids fluttered and sank, and she dropped on to his arm.
`She is asleep,' whispered Lettie.
Immediately the dark eyes opened again. We looked significantly at one another, continuing our subdued talk. After a while the baby slept soundly.
Presently Meg came downstairs, She greeted us in breathless whispers of surprise, and then turned to her husband.
'Has she gone?' she whispered, bending over the sleeping child in astonishment. `My, this is wonderful, isn't it!'
She took the sleeping, drooping baby from his arms, putting her mouth close to its forehead, murmuring with soothing, inarticulate sounds.
We stayed talking for some time when Meg had put the baby to bed. George had a new tone of assurance and authority. In the first place he was an established man, living in a large house, having altogether three men working for him. In the second place he had ceased to value the conventional treasures of social position and ostentatious refinement. Very, very many things he condemned as flummery and sickly waste of time. The life of an ordinary well-to-do person he set down as adorned futility, almost idiocy. He spoke passionately of the monstrous denial of life to the many by the fortunate few. He talked at Lettie most flagrantly.
`Of course,' she said, `I have read Mr. Wells and Mr. Shaw, and even Neil Lyons and a Dutchman-what is his name, Querido? But what can I do? I think the rich have as much misery as the poor, and of quite as deadly a sort. What can I do? It is a question of life and the development of the human race. Society and its regulations is not a sort of drill that endless Napoleons have forced on us: it is the only way we have yet found of living together.'
`Pahl' said he, `that is rank cowardice. It is feeble and futile to the last degree.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE twisting her father's ear in her small fingers till he winced. `Her nails are sharp,' he said, smiling. He began asking and giving what is small information that pass between friends who have not met for a long time. what is baby laid her head on his shoulder, keeping her tired, owl-like eyes fixed darkly on us. Then gradually what is lids fluttered and sank, and she dropped on to his arm. `She is asleep,' whispered Lettie. Immediately what is dark eyes opened again. We looked significantly at one another, continuing our subdued talk. After a while what is baby slept soundly. Presently Meg came downstairs, She greeted us in breathless whispers of surprise, and then turned to her husband. 'Has she gone?' she whispered, bending over what is sleeping child in astonishment. `My, this is wonderful, isn't it!' She took what is sleeping, drooping baby from his arms, putting her mouth close to its forehead, murmuring with soothing, inarticulate sounds. We stayed talking for some time when Meg had put what is baby to bed. George had a new tone of assurance and authority. In what is first place he was an established man, living in a large house, having altogether three men working for him. In what is second place he had ceased to value what is conventional treasures of social position and ostentatious refinement. Very, very many things he condemned as flummery and sickly waste of time. what is life of an ordinary well-to-do person he set down as adorned futility, almost idiocy. He spoke passionately of what is monstrous denial of life to what is many by what is fortunate few. He talked at Lettie most flagrantly. `Of course,' she said, `I have read Mr. Wells and Mr. Shaw, and even Neil Lyons and a Dutchman-what is his name, Querido? But what can I do? I think what is rich have as much misery as what is poor, and of quite as deadly a sort. What can I do? It is a question of life and what is development of what is human race. Society and its regulations is not a sort of drill that endless Napoleons have forced on us: it is what is only way we have yet found of living together.' `Pahl' said he, `that is rank cowardice. It is feeble and futile to what is last degree.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 328 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VI PISGAH where is p align="justify" twisting her father's ear in her small fingers till he winced. `Her nails are sharp,' he said, smiling. He began asking and giving what is small information that pass between friends who have not met for a long time. what is baby laid her head on his shoulder, keeping her tired, owl-like eyes fixed darkly on us. Then gradually what is lids fluttered and sank, and she dropped on to his arm. `She is asleep,' whispered Lettie. Immediately what is dark eyes opened again. We looked significantly at one another, continuing our subdued talk. After a while what is baby slept soundly. Presently Meg came downstairs, She greeted us in breathless whispers of surprise, and then turned to her husband. 'Has she gone?' she whispered, bending over what is sleeping child in astonishment. `My, this is wonderful, isn't it!' She took what is sleeping, drooping baby from his arms, putting her mouth close to its forehead, murmuring with soothing, inarticulate sounds. We stayed talking for some time when Meg had put what is baby to bed. George had a new tone of assurance and authority. In what is first place he was an established man, living in a large house, having altogether three men working for him. In what is second place he had ceased to value what is conventional treasures of social position and ostentatious refinement. Very, very many things he condemned as flummery and sickly waste of time. what is life of an ordinary well-to-do person he set down as adorned futility, almost idiocy. He spoke passionately of what is monstrous denial of life to what is many by what is fortunate few. He talked at Lettie most flagrantly. `Of course,' she said, `I have read Mr. Wells and Mr. Shaw, and even Neil Lyons and a Dutchman-what is his name, Querido? But what can I do? I think what is rich have as much misery as what is poor, and of quite as deadly a sort. What can I do? It is a question of life and what is development of what is human race. Society and its regulations is not a sort of drill that endless Napoleons have forced on us: it is what is only way we have yet found of living together.' `Pahl' said he, `that is rank cowardice. It is feeble and futile to what is last degree.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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