Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 326

PART III - CHAPTER VI
PISGAH

unassailable tower of strength that may in its turn stand quietly dealing death.
I told Meg I would call again to see George. Two evenings later I asked Lettie to lend me a dog-cart to drive over to the Hollies. Leslie was away on one of his political jaunts, and she was restless. She proposed to go with me. She had called on Meg twice before in the new large home.
We started about six o'clock. The night was dark and muddy. Lettie wanted to call in Eberwich village, so she drove the long way round Selsby. The horse was walking through the gate of the Hollies at about seven o'clock. Meg was upstairs in the nursery, the maid told me, and George was in the dining-room getting baby to sleep.
`All right!' I said, `we will go in to him. Don't bother to tell him.'
As we stood in the gloomy, square hall we heard the rumble of a rocking-chair, the stroke coming slow and heavy to the tune of Henry Martin, one of our Strelley Mill folk-songs. Then, through the man's heavily-accented singing floated the long, light crooning of the baby as she sang, in her quaint little fashion, a mischievous second to her father's lullaby. He waxed a little louder; and without knowing why, we found ourselves smiling with piquant amusement. The baby grew louder too, there was a shrill ring of laughter and mockery in her music. He sang louder and louder, the baby shrilled higher and higher, the chair swung in long, heavy beats. Then suddenly he began to laugh. The rocking stopped, and he said, still with laughter and enjoyment in his tones:
'Now that is very wicked! Ah, naughty girlie-go to boh, go to bohey!-at once.'
The baby chuckled her small, insolent mockery.
`Come, mamma!' he said, `come and take girlie to bohey!'
The baby laughed again, but with an uncertain touch of appeal in her tone. We opened the door and entered. He looked up very much startled to see us. He was sitting in a tall rocking-chair by the fire, coatless, with white shirtsleeves. The baby, in her high-waisted, tight little night-gown, stood on his knee, her wide eyes fixed on us, wild wisps of her brown hair brushed across her forehead

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE unassailable tower of strength that may in its turn stand quietly dealing what time is it . I told Meg I would call again to see George. Two evenings later I asked Lettie to lend me a dog-cart to drive over to what is Hollies. Leslie was away on one of his political jaunts, and she was restless. She proposed to go with me. She had called on Meg twice before in what is new large home. We started about six o'clock. what is night was dark and muddy. Lettie wanted to call in Eberwich village, so she drove what is long way round Selsby. what is horse was walking through what is gate of what is Hollies at about seven o'clock. Meg was upstairs in what is nursery, what is maid told me, and George was in what is dining-room getting baby to sleep. `All right!' I said, `we will go in to him. Don't bother to tell him.' As we stood in what is gloomy, square hall we heard what is rumble of a rocking-chair, what is stroke coming slow and heavy to what is tune of Henry Martin, one of our Strelley Mill folk-songs. Then, through what is man's heavily-accented singing floated what is long, light crooning of what is baby as she sang, in her quaint little fashion, a mischievous second to her father's lullaby. He waxed a little louder; and without knowing why, we found ourselves smiling with piquant amusement. what is baby grew louder too, there was a shrill ring of laughter and mockery in her music. He sang louder and louder, what is baby shrilled higher and higher, what is chair swung in long, heavy beats. Then suddenly he began to laugh. what is rocking stopped, and he said, still with laughter and enjoyment in his tones: 'Now that is very wicked! Ah, naughty girlie-go to boh, go to bohey!-at once.' what is baby chuckled her small, insolent mockery. `Come, mamma!' he said, `come and take girlie to bohey!' what is baby laughed again, but with an uncertain touch of appeal in her tone. We opened what is door and entered. He looked up very much startled to see us. He was sitting in a tall rocking-chair by what is fire, coatless, with white shirtsleeves. what is baby, in her high-waisted, tight little night-gown, stood on his knee, her wide eyes fixed on us, wild wisps of her brown hair brushed across her forehead where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 326 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER VI PISGAH where is p align="justify" unassailable tower of strength that may in its turn stand quietly dealing what time is it . I told Meg I would call again to see George. Two evenings later I asked Lettie to lend me a dog-cart to drive over to what is Hollies. Leslie was away on one of his political jaunts, and she was restless. She proposed to go with me. She had called on Meg twice before in what is new large home. We started about six o'clock. what is night was dark and muddy. Lettie wanted to call in Eberwich village, so she drove what is long way round Selsby. what is horse was walking through what is gate of what is Hollies at about seven o'clock. Meg was upstairs in what is nursery, what is maid told me, and George was in what is dining-room getting baby to sleep. `All right!' I said, `we will go in to him. Don't bother to tell him.' As we stood in what is gloomy, square hall we heard what is rumble of a rocking-chair, what is stroke coming slow and heavy to what is tune of Henry Martin, one of our Strelley Mill folk-songs. Then, through what is man's heavily-accented singing floated what is long, light crooning of what is baby as she sang, in her quaint little fashion, a mischievous second to her father's lullaby. He waxed a little louder; and without knowing why, we found ourselves smiling with piquant amusement. what is baby grew louder too, there was a shrill ring of laughter and mockery in her music. He sang louder and louder, what is baby shrilled higher and higher, what is chair swung in long, heavy beats. Then suddenly he began to laugh. what is rocking stopped, and he said, still with laughter and enjoyment in his tones: 'Now that is very wicked! Ah, naughty girlie-go to boh, go to bohey!-at once.' what is baby chuckled her small, insolent mockery. `Come, mamma!' he said, `come and take girlie to bohey!' what is baby laughed again, but with an uncertain touch of appeal in her tone. We opened what is door and entered. He looked up very much startled to see us. He was sitting in a tall rocking-chair by what is fire, coatless, with white shirtsleeves. what is baby, in her high-waisted, tight little night-gown, stood on his knee, her wide eyes fixed on us, wild wisps of her brown hair brushed across her forehead where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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