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Page 317

PART III - CHAPTER V
THE DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING

servant, she is no longer responsible for herself, which would make her terrified and lonely. Service is light and easy. To be responsible for the good progress of one's life is terrifying. It is the most insufferable form of loneliness, and the heaviest of responsibilities. So Lettie indulged her husband, but did not yield her independence to him; rather it was she who took much of the responsibility of him into her hands, and therefore he was so devoted to her. She had, however, now determined to abandon the charge of herself to serve her children. When the children grew up, either they would unconsciously fling her away, back upon herself again in bitterness and loneliness, or they would tenderly cherish her, chafing at her love-bonds occasionally.
George looked and listened to all the flutter of conversation, and. said nothing. It seemed to him like so much unreasonable rustling of pieces of paper, of leaves of books, and so on. Later in the evening Lettie sang, no longer Italian folk-songs, but the fragmentary utterances of Debussy and Strauss. These also to George were quite meaningless, and rather wearisome. It made him impatient to see her wasting herself upon them.
`Do you like those songs?' she asked in the frank, careless manner she affected.
`Not much,' he replied, ungraciously.
`Don't you?' she exclaimed, adding with a smile, `Those are the most wonderful things in the world, those little things'-she began to hum a Debussy idiom. He could not answer her on the point, so he sat with the arrow sticking in him, and did not speak.
She inquired of him concerning Meg and his children and the affairs of Eberwich, but the interest was flimsy, as she preserved a wide distance between them, although apparently she was so unaffected and friendly. We left before eleven.
When we were seated in the cab and rushing downhill, he said:
'You know, she makes me mad.'
He was frowning, looking out of the window away from me.
`Who, Lettie? Why, what riles you?' I asked.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE servant, she is no longer responsible for herself, which would make her terrified and lonely. Service is light and easy. To be responsible for what is good progress of one's life is terrifying. It is what is most insufferable form of loneliness, and what is heaviest of responsibilities. So Lettie indulged her husband, but did not yield her independence to him; rather it was she who took much of what is responsibility of him into her hands, and therefore he was so devoted to her. She had, however, now determined to abandon what is charge of herself to serve her children. When what is children grew up, either they would unconsciously fling her away, back upon herself again in bitterness and loneliness, or they would tenderly cherish her, chafing at her love-bonds occasionally. George looked and listened to all what is flutter of conversation, and. said nothing. It seemed to him like so much unreasonable rustling of pieces of paper, of leaves of books, and so on. Later in what is evening Lettie sang, no longer Italian folk-songs, but what is fragmentary utterances of Debussy and Strauss. These also to George were quite meaningless, and rather wearisome. It made him impatient to see her wasting herself upon them. `Do you like those songs?' she asked in what is frank, careless manner she affected. `Not much,' he replied, ungraciously. `Don't you?' she exclaimed, adding with a smile, `Those are what is most wonderful things in what is world, those little things'-she began to hum a Debussy idiom. He could not answer her on what is point, so he sat with what is arrow sticking in him, and did not speak. She inquired of him concerning Meg and his children and what is affairs of Eberwich, but what is interest was flimsy, as she preserved a wide distance between them, although apparently she was so unaffected and friendly. We left before eleven. When we were seated in what is cab and rushing downhill, he said: 'You know, she makes me mad.' He was frowning, looking out of what is window away from me. `Who, Lettie? Why, what riles you?' I asked. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 317 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER V what is DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING where is p align="justify" servant, she is no longer responsible for herself, which would make her terrified and lonely. Service is light and easy. To be responsible for what is good progress of one's life is terrifying. It is what is most insufferable form of loneliness, and what is heaviest of responsibilities. So Lettie indulged her husband, but did not yield her independence to him; rather it was she who took much of what is responsibility of him into her hands, and therefore he was so devoted to her. She had, however, now determined to abandon what is charge of herself to serve her children. When what is children grew up, either they would unconsciously fling her away, back upon herself again in bitterness and loneliness, or they would tenderly cherish her, chafing at her love-bonds occasionally. George looked and listened to all what is flutter of conversation, and. said nothing. It seemed to him like so much unreasonable rustling of pieces of paper, of leaves of books, and so on. Later in what is evening Lettie sang, no longer Italian folk-songs, but what is fragmentary utterances of Debussy and Strauss. These also to George were quite meaningless, and rather wearisome. It made him impatient to see her wasting herself upon them. `Do you like those songs?' she asked in what is frank, careless manner she affected. `Not much,' he replied, ungraciously. `Don't you?' she exclaimed, adding with a smile, `Those are what is most wonderful things in what is world, those little things'-she began to hum a Debussy idiom. He could not answer her on what is point, so he sat with what is arrow sticking in him, and did not speak. She inquired of him concerning Meg and his children and what is affairs of Eberwich, but what is interest was flimsy, as she preserved a wide distance between them, although apparently she was so unaffected and friendly. We left before eleven. When we were seated in what is cab and rushing downhill, he said: 'You know, she makes me mad.' He was frowning, looking out of what is window away from me. `Who, Lettie? Why, what riles you?' I asked. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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