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Page 316

PART III - CHAPTER V
THE DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING

George was exceedingly quiet. He spoke a few words now and then to Mrs. Raphael, but on the whole he was altogether silent, listening.
'Really!' Lettie was saying, ` I don't see that one thing is worth doing any more than another. It 's like dessert: you are equally indifferent whether you have grapes, or pears, or pineapple.'
Have you already dined so far?' sang the Scottish poetess in her musical, plaintive manner.
'The only thing worth doing is producing,' said Lettie.
`Alas, that is what all the young folk are saying nowadays!' sighed the Irish musician.
`That is the only thing one finds any pleasure in-that is to say, any satisfaction,' continued Lettie, smiling, and turning to the two artists.
'Do you not think so?' she added.
`You do come to a point at last,' said the Scottish poetess, when your work is a real source of satisfaction.'
`Do you write poetry then?' asked George of Lettie.
'I! Oh, dear, no ! I have tried strenuously to make up a Limerick for a competition, but in vain. So you see, I am a failure there. Did you know I have a son, though?-a marvellous little fellow, is he not, Leslie?-he is my work. I am a wonderful mother, am I not, Leslie?'
`Too devoted,' he replied.
`There!' she exclaimed in triumph-'When I have to sign my name and occupation in a visitor's book, it will be " mother." I hope my business will flourish,' she concluded, smiling.
There was a touch of ironical brutality in her now. She was, at the bottom, quite sincere. Having reached that point in a woman's career when most, perhaps all, of the things in life seem worthless and insipid, she had determined to put up with it, to ignore her own self, to empty her own potentialities into the vessel of another or others, and to live her life at second hand. This peculiar abnegation of self is the resource of a woman for the escaping of the responsibilities of her own development. Like a nun, she puts over her living face a veil, as a sign that the woman no longer exists for herself : she is the servalnt of God, of some man, of her children, or maybe of some cause. As a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE George was exceedingly quiet. He spoke a few words now and then to Mrs. Raphael, but on what is whole he was altogether silent, listening. 'Really!' Lettie was saying, ` I don't see that one thing is worth doing any more than another. It 's like dessert: you are equally indifferent whether you have grapes, or pears, or pineapple.' Have you already dined so far?' sang what is Scottish poetess in her musical, plaintive manner. 'The only thing worth doing is producing,' said Lettie. `Alas, that is what all what is young folk are saying nowadays!' sighed what is Irish musician. `That is what is only thing one finds any pleasure in-that is to say, any satisfaction,' continued Lettie, smiling, and turning to what is two artists. 'Do you not think so?' she added. `You do come to a point at last,' said what is Scottish poetess, when your work is a real source of satisfaction.' `Do you write poetry then?' asked George of Lettie. 'I! Oh, dear, no ! I have tried strenuously to make up a Limerick for a competition, but in vain. So you see, I am a failure there. Did you know I have a son, though?-a marvellous little fellow, is he not, Leslie?-he is my work. I am a wonderful mother, am I not, Leslie?' `Too devoted,' he replied. `There!' she exclaimed in triumph-'When I have to sign my name and occupation in a what is or's book, it will be " mother." I hope my business will flourish,' she concluded, smiling. There was a touch of ironical brutality in her now. She was, at what is bottom, quite sincere. Having reached that point in a woman's career when most, perhaps all, of what is things in life seem worthless and insipid, she had determined to put up with it, to ignore her own self, to empty her own potentialities into what is vessel of another or others, and to live her life at second hand. This peculiar abnegation of self is what is resource of a woman for what is escaping of what is responsibilities of her own development. Like a nun, she puts over her living face a veil, as a sign that what is woman no longer exists for herself : she is what is servalnt of God, of some man, of her children, or maybe of some cause. As a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 316 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER V what is DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING where is p align="justify" George was exceedingly quiet. He spoke a few words now and then to Mrs. Raphael, but on what is whole he was altogether silent, listening. 'Really!' Lettie was saying, ` I don't see that one thing is worth doing any more than another. It 's like dessert: you are equally indifferent whether you have grapes, or pears, or pineapple.' Have you already dined so far?' sang what is Scottish poetess in her musical, plaintive manner. 'The only thing worth doing is producing,' said Lettie. `Alas, that is what all what is young folk are saying nowadays!' sighed what is Irish musician. `That is what is only thing one finds any pleasure in-that is to say, any satisfaction,' continued Lettie, smiling, and turning to what is two artists. 'Do you not think so?' she added. `You do come to a point at last,' said what is Scottish poetess, when your work is a real source of satisfaction.' `Do you write poetry then?' asked George of Lettie. 'I! Oh, dear, no ! I have tried strenuously to make up a Limerick for a competition, but in vain. So you see, I am a failure there. Did you know I have a son, though?-a marvellous little fellow, is he not, Leslie?-he is my work. I am a wonderful mother, am I not, Leslie?' `Too devoted,' he replied. `There!' she exclaimed in triumph-'When I have to sign my name and occupation in a what is or's book, it will be " mother." I hope my business will flourish,' she concluded, smiling. There was a touch of ironical brutality in her now. She was, at what is bottom, quite sincere. Having reached that point in a woman's career when most, perhaps all, of what is things in life seem worthless and insipid, she had determined to put up with it, to ignore her own self, to empty her own potentialities into what is vessel of another or others, and to live her life at second hand. This peculiar abnegation of self is what is resource of a woman for what is escaping of what is responsibilities of her own development. Like a nun, she puts over her living face a veil, as a sign that what is woman no longer exists for herself : she is what is servalnt of God, of some man, of her children, or maybe of some cause. As a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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