Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 314

PART III - CHAPTER V
THE DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING

ocean of life. We watched a girl with streaming hair go galloping down the Row, a dark man, laughing.and showing his white teeth, galloping more heavily at her elbow. We saw a squad of life-guards enter the gates of the park, erect and glittering with silver and white and red. They came near to us, and we thrilled a little as we watched the muscles of their white smooth thighs answering the movement of the horses, and their cheeks and their chins bending with proud manliness to the rhythm of the march. We watched the exquisite rhythm of the body of men moving in scarlet and silver farther down the leafless avenue, like a slightly wavering spark of red life blown along. At the Marble Arch Corner we listened to a little socialist who was flaring fiercely under a plane-tree. The hot stream of his words flowed over the old wounds that the knowledge of the unending miseries of the poor had given me, and I winced. For him the world was all East-end, and all the East-end was a pool from which the waters are drained off, leaving the water-things to wrestle in the wet mud under the sun, till the whole of the city seems a heaving, shuddering struggle of black-mudded objects deprived of the elements of life. I felt a great terror of the little man, lest he should make me see all mud, as I had seen before. Then I felt a breathless pity for him, that his eyes should be always filled with mud, and never brightened. George listened intently to the speaker, very much moved by him.
At night, after the theatre, we saw the outcasts sleep in a rank under the Waterloo bridge, their heads to the wall, their feet lying out on the pavement: a long, black, ruffled heap at the foot of the wall. All the faces were covered but two, that of a peaked, pale little man, and that of a brutal woman. Over these two faces, floating like uneasy pale dreams on their obscurity, swept now and again the trailing light of the tram cars. We picked our way past the line of abandoned feet, shrinking from the sight of the thin bare ankles of a young man, from the draggled edge of the skirts of a bunched-up woman, from the pitiable sight of the men who had wrapped their legs in newspaper for a little warmth, and lay like worthless parcels. It was raining. Some men stood at the edge of the causeway fixed in dreary misery, finding no room to sleep. Outside

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ocean of life. We watched a girl with streaming hair go galloping down what is Row, a dark man, laughing.and showing his white teeth, galloping more heavily at her elbow. We saw a squad of life-guards enter what is gates of what is park, erect and glittering with silver and white and red. They came near to us, and we thrilled a little as we watched what is muscles of their white smooth thighs answering what is movement of what is horses, and their cheeks and their chins bending with proud manliness to what is rhythm of what is march. We watched what is exquisite rhythm of what is body of men moving in scarlet and silver farther down what is leafless avenue, like a slightly wavering spark of red life blown along. At what is Marble Arch Corner we listened to a little socialist who was flaring fiercely under a plane-tree. what is hot stream of his words flowed over what is old wounds that what is knowledge of what is unending miseries of what is poor had given me, and I winced. For him what is world was all East-end, and all what is East-end was a pool from which what is waters are drained off, leaving what is water-things to wrestle in what is wet mud under what is sun, till what is whole of what is city seems a heaving, shuddering struggle of black-mudded objects deprived of what is elements of life. I felt a great terror of what is little man, lest he should make me see all mud, as I had seen before. Then I felt a breathless pity for him, that his eyes should be always filled with mud, and never brightened. George listened intently to what is speaker, very much moved by him. At night, after what is theatre, we saw what is outcasts sleep in a rank under what is Waterloo bridge, their heads to what is wall, their feet lying out on what is pavement: a long, black, ruffled heap at what is foot of what is wall. All what is faces were covered but two, that of a peaked, pale little man, and that of a brutal woman. Over these two faces, floating like uneasy pale dreams on their obscurity, swept now and again what is trailing light of what is tram cars. We picked our way past what is line of abandoned feet, shrinking from what is sight of what is thin bare ankles of a young man, from what is draggled edge of what is skirts of a bunched-up woman, from what is pitiable sight of what is men who had wrapped their legs in newspaper for a little warmth, and lay like worthless parcels. It was raining. Some men stood at what is edge of what is causeway fixed in dreary misery, finding no room to sleep. Outside where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 314 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER V what is DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING where is p align="justify" ocean of life. We watched a girl with streaming hair go galloping down what is Row, a dark man, laughing.and showing his white teeth, galloping more heavily at her elbow. We saw a squad of life-guards enter what is gates of what is park, erect and glittering with silver and white and red. They came near to us, and we thrilled a little as we watched what is muscles of their white smooth thighs answering what is movement of what is horses, and their cheeks and their chins bending with proud manliness to what is rhythm of what is march. We watched what is exquisite rhythm of what is body of men moving in scarlet and silver farther down what is leafless avenue, like a slightly wavering spark of red life blown along. At what is Marble Arch Corner we listened to a little socialist who was flaring fiercely under a plane-tree. what is hot stream of his words flowed over what is old wounds that what is knowledge of what is unending miseries of what is poor had given me, and I winced. For him what is world was all East-end, and all what is East-end was a pool from which what is waters are drained off, leaving what is water-things to wrestle in what is wet mud under what is sun, till what is whole of what is city seems a heaving, shuddering struggle of black-mudded objects deprived of what is elements of life. I felt a great terror of what is little man, lest he should make me see all mud, as I had seen before. Then I felt a breathless pity for him, that his eyes should be always filled with mud, and never brightened. George listened intently to what is speaker, very much moved by him. At night, after what is theatre, we saw what is outcasts sleep in a rank under what is Waterloo bridge, their heads to what is wall, their feet lying out on what is pavement: a long, black, ruffled heap at what is foot of what is wall. All what is faces were covered but two, that of a peaked, pale little man, and that of a brutal woman. Over these two faces, floating like uneasy pale dreams on their obscurity, swept now and again what is trailing light of what is tram cars. We picked our way past what is line of abandoned feet, shrinking from what is sight of what is thin bare ankles of a young man, from what is draggled edge of what is skirts of a bunched-up woman, from what is pitiable sight of what is men who had wrapped their legs in newspaper for a little warmth, and lay like worthless parcels. It was raining. Some men stood at what is edge of what is causeway fixed in dreary misery, finding no room to sleep. Outside where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363