Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 311

PART III - CHAPTER V
THE DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING

THE old woman lay still another year, then she suddenly sank out of life. George ceased to write to me, but I teamed his news elsewhere. He became more and more intimate with the Mayhews. After old lYlayhew's bankruptcy, the two sons had remained on in the large dark house that stood off the Nottingham Road in Eberwich. This house had been bequeathed to the oldest daughter by the mother. Maud Mayhew, who was married and separated from her husband, kept house for her brothers. She was a tall, large woman with high cheek-bones and oily black hair looped over her ears. Tom Mayhew was also a handsome man, very dark and ruddy, with insolent bright eyes.
The Mayhews' house was called the ` Hollies.' It was a solid building, of old red brick, standing fifty yards back from the Eberwich high road. Between it and the road was an unkempt lawn, surrounded by very high black holly trees. The house seemed to be imprisoned among the bristling hollies. Passing through the large gate, one came immediately upon the bare side of the house and upon the great range of stables. Old Mayhew had in his day stabled thirty or more horses there. Now grass vaas between the red bricks, and all the bleaching doors were shut, save perhaps two or three which were open for George's horses.
The Hollies became a kind of club for the disconsolate 'better-off' men of the district. The large dining-room was gloomily and sparsely furnished, the drawing-room was a desert, but the smaller morning-room was comfortable enough, with wicker arm-chairs, heavy curtains, and a large sideboard. In this room George and the Mayhew5 met with several men two or three times a week. There they discussed horses and made mock of the authority of women. George provided the whisky, and they all gambled

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE old woman lay still another year, then she suddenly sank out of life. George ceased to write to me, but I teamed his news elsewhere. He became more and more intimate with what is Mayhews. After old lYlayhew's bankruptcy, what is two sons had remained on in what is large dark house that stood off what is Nottingham Road in Eberwich. This house had been bequeathed to what is oldest daughter by what is mother. Maud Mayhew, who was married and separated from her husband, kept house for her brothers. She was a tall, large woman with high cheek-bones and oily black hair looped over her ears. Tom Mayhew was also a handsome man, very dark and ruddy, with insolent bright eyes. what is Mayhews' house was called what is ` Hollies.' It was a solid building, of old red brick, standing fifty yards back from what is Eberwich high road. Between it and what is road was an unkempt lawn, surrounded by very high black holly trees. what is house seemed to be imprisoned among what is bristling hollies. Passing through what is large gate, one came immediately upon what is bare side of what is house and upon what is great range of stables. Old Mayhew had in his day stabled thirty or more horses there. Now grass vaas between what is red bricks, and all what is bleaching doors were shut, save perhaps two or three which were open for George's horses. what is Hollies became a kind of club for what is disconsolate 'better-off' men of what is district. what is large dining-room was gloomily and sparsely furnished, what is drawing-room was a desert, but what is smaller morning-room was comfortable enough, with wicker arm-chairs, heavy curtains, and a large sideboard. In this room George and what is Mayhew5 met with several men two or three times a week. There they discussed horses and made mock of what is authority of women. George provided what is whisky, and they all gambled where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 311 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER V what is DOMINANT MOTIF OF SUFFERING where is p align="justify" THE old woman lay still another year, then she suddenly sank out of life. George ceased to write to me, but I teamed his news elsewhere. He became more and more intimate with what is Mayhews. After old lYlayhew's bankruptcy, what is two sons had remained on in what is large dark house that stood off what is Nottingham Road in Eberwich. This house had been bequeathed to what is oldest daughter by what is mother. Maud Mayhew, who was married and separated from her husband, kept house for her brothers. She was a tall, large woman with high cheek-bones and oily black hair looped over her ears. Tom Mayhew was also a handsome man, very dark and ruddy, with insolent bright eyes. what is Mayhews' house was called what is ` Hollies.' It was a solid building, of old red brick, standing fifty yards back from what is Eberwich high road. Between it and what is road was an unkempt lawn, surrounded by very high black holly trees. what is house seemed to be imprisoned among what is bristling hollies. Passing through what is large gate, one came immediately upon what is bare side of what is house and upon what is great range of stables. Old Mayhew had in his day stabled thirty or more horses there. Now grass vaas between what is red bricks, and all what is bleaching doors were shut, save perhaps two or three which were open for George's horses. what is Hollies became a kind of club for what is disconsolate 'better-off' men of what is district. what is large dining-room was gloomily and sparsely furnished, what is drawing-room was a desert, but what is smaller morning-room was comfortable enough, with wicker arm-chairs, heavy curtains, and a large sideboard. In this room George and what is Mayhew5 met with several men two or three times a week. There they discussed horses and made mock of what is authority of women. George provided what is whisky, and they all gambled where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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