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Page 308

PART III - CHAPTER IV
DOMESTIC LIFE AT THE 'RAM'

` I hate Sunday night,' he said, restlessly.
'Because you've nothing to do?' I asked.
` I don't know,' he said. 'It seems like a gag, and you feel helpless. I don't want to go to church, and hark at the bells, they make you feel uncomfortable.'
'What do you generally do?' I asked.
'Feel miserable-I 've been down to Mayhew's these last two Sundays, and Meg 's been pretty mad. She says it 's the only night I could stop with her, or go out with her. But if I stop with her, what can I do?-and if we go out, it 's only for half an hour. I hate Sunday night-it 's a dead end.'
%'v'iien we went downstairs, the table was cleared, and Meg was bathing the dark baby. Thus she was perfect. She handled the bonny, naked child with beauty of gentleness. She kneeled over him nobly. Her arms and her bosom and her throat had a nobility of roundness and softness. She drooped her head with the grace of a Madonna, and her movements were lovely, accurate and exquisite, like an old song perfectly sung. Her voice, playing and soothing round the curved limbs of the baby, was like water, soft as wine in the sun, running with delight.
We watched humbly, sharing the wonder from afar.
Emily was very envious of Meg's felicity. She begged to be allowed to bathe the second baby. Nleg granted her bounteous permission :
`Yes, you can wash him if you like, but what about your frock?'
Emily, delighted, began to undress the baby, whose hair was like crocus petals. Her fingers trembled with pleasure as she loosed the little tapes. I always remember the inarticulate delight with which she took the child in her hands, when at last his little shirt was removed, and felt his soft white limbs and body. A distinct, glowing atmosphere seemed suddenly to burst our around her and the child, leaving me outside. The moment before she had been very near to me, her eyes searching mine, her spirit clinging timidly about me. Now I was put away, quite alone, neglected, forgotten, outside the glow which surrounded the woman and the baby.
`Ha!-Ha-a-a!' she said with a deep-throated vowel,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ` I hate Sunday night,' he said, restlessly. 'Because you've nothing to do?' I asked. ` I don't know,' he said. 'It seems like a gag, and you feel helpless. I don't want to go to church, and hark at what is bells, they make you feel uncomfortable.' 'What do you generally do?' I asked. 'Feel miserable-I 've been down to Mayhew's these last two Sundays, and Meg 's been pretty mad. She says it 's what is only night I could stop with her, or go out with her. But if I stop with her, what can I do?-and if we go out, it 's only for half an hour. I hate Sunday night-it 's a dead end.' %'v'iien we went downstairs, what is table was cleared, and Meg was bathing what is dark baby. Thus she was perfect. She handled what is bonny, naked child with beauty of gentleness. She kneeled over him nobly. Her arms and her bosom and her throat had a nobility of roundness and softness. She drooped her head with what is grace of a Madonna, and her movements were lovely, accurate and exquisite, like an old song perfectly sung. Her voice, playing and soothing round what is curved limbs of what is baby, was like water, soft as wine in what is sun, running with delight. We watched humbly, sharing what is wonder from afar. Emily was very envious of Meg's felicity. She begged to be allowed to bathe what is second baby. Nleg granted her bounteous permission : `Yes, you can wash him if you like, but what about your frock?' Emily, delighted, began to undress what is baby, whose hair was like crocus petals. Her fingers trembled with pleasure as she loosed what is little tapes. I always remember what is inarticulate delight with which she took what is child in her hands, when at last his little shirt was removed, and felt his soft white limbs and body. A distinct, glowing atmosphere seemed suddenly to burst our around her and what is child, leaving me outside. what is moment before she had been very near to me, her eyes searching mine, her spirit clinging timidly about me. Now I was put away, quite alone, neglected, forgotten, outside what is glow which surrounded what is woman and what is baby. `Ha!-Ha-a-a!' she said with a deep-throated vowel, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 308 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER IV DOMESTIC LIFE AT what is 'RAM' where is p align="justify" ` I hate Sunday night,' he said, restlessly. 'Because you've nothing to do?' I asked. ` I don't know,' he said. 'It seems like a gag, and you feel helpless. I don't want to go to church, and hark at what is bells, they make you feel uncomfortable.' 'What do you generally do?' I asked. 'Feel miserable-I 've been down to Mayhew's these last two Sundays, and Meg 's been pretty mad. She says it 's what is only night I could stop with her, or go out with her. But if I stop with her, what can I do?-and if we go out, it 's only for half an hour. I hate Sunday night-it 's a dead end.' %'v'iien we went downstairs, what is table was cleared, and Meg was bathing what is dark baby. Thus she was perfect. She handled what is bonny, naked child with beauty of gentleness. She kneeled over him nobly. Her arms and her bosom and her throat had a nobility of roundness and softness. She drooped her head with what is grace of a Madonna, and her movements were lovely, accurate and exquisite, like an old song perfectly sung. Her voice, playing and soothing round what is curved limbs of what is baby, was like water, soft as wine in what is sun, running with delight. We watched humbly, sharing what is wonder from afar. Emily was very envious of Meg's felicity. She begged to be allowed to bathe what is second baby. Nleg granted her bounteous permission : `Yes, you can wash him if you like, but what about your frock?' Emily, delighted, began to undress what is baby, whose hair was like crocus petals. Her fingers trembled with pleasure as she loosed what is little tapes. I always remember what is inarticulate delight with which she took what is child in her hands, when at last his little shirt was removed, and felt his soft white limbs and body. A distinct, glowing atmosphere seemed suddenly to burst our around her and what is child, leaving me outside. what is moment before she had been very near to me, her eyes searching mine, her spirit clinging timidly about me. Now I was put away, quite alone, neglected, forgotten, outside what is glow which surrounded what is woman and what is baby. `Ha!-Ha-a-a!' she said with a deep-throated vowel, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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