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Page 306

PART III - CHAPTER IV
DOMESTIC LIFE AT THE 'RAM'

`Bring Alfy to me,' called Meg, yielding to the mother feeling.
'Oh, no, damn it!' said George, 'let Oswald take him.'
`Yes,' replied Meg bitterly, `let anybody take him so long as he 's out of your sight. You never ought to have children, you didn't '
George murmured something about 'to-day.'
'Come then !' said Meg with a whole passion of tenderness, as she took the red-haired baby and held it to her bosom: 'Why, what is it then, what is it, my precious? Hush then, pet, hush then!'
The baby did not hush. Meg rose from her chair and stood rocking the baby in her arms, swaying from one foot to the other.
'He 's got a bit of wind,' she said.
We tried to continue the meal, but everything was awkward and difficult.
` I wonder if he's hungry,' said Meg, 'let's try him.'
She turned away and gave him her breast. Then he was still, so she covered herself as much as she could, and sat down again to tea. We had finished, so we sat and waited while she ate. This disjoiriting of the meal, by reflex action, made Emily and me more accurate. We were exquisitely attentive, and polite to a nicety. Our very speech was clipped with precision, as we drifted to a discussion of Strauss and Debussy. This of course put a breach between us two and our hosts, but we could not help it; it was our only way of covering over the awkwardness of the occasion. George sat looking glum and listening to us. Meg was quite indifferent. She listened occasionally, but her position as mother made her impregnable. She sat eating calmly, looking down now and again at her baby, holding us in slight scorn, babblers that we were. She was secure in her high maternity; she was mistress and sole authority. George, as father, was first servant; as an, indifferent father, she humiliated him and was hostile to his wishes. Emily and I were mere intruders, feeling ourselves such. After tea we went upstairs to wash our hands. The grandmother had had a second stroke of paralysis, and lay inert, almost stupefied. Her large bulk upon the bed was horrible to me, and her face, with the muscles all slack and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Bring Alfy to me,' called Meg, yielding to what is mother feeling. 'Oh, no, damn it!' said George, 'let Oswald take him.' `Yes,' replied Meg bitterly, `let anybody take him so long as he 's out of your sight. You never ought to have children, you didn't ' George murmured something about 'to-day.' 'Come then !' said Meg with a whole passion of tenderness, as she took what is red-haired baby and held it to her bosom: 'Why, what is it then, what is it, my precious? Hush then, pet, hush then!' what is baby did not hush. Meg rose from her chair and stood rocking what is baby in her arms, swaying from one foot to what is other. 'He 's got a bit of wind,' she said. We tried to continue what is meal, but everything was awkward and difficult. ` I wonder if he's hungry,' said Meg, 'let's try him.' She turned away and gave him her breast. Then he was still, so she covered herself as much as she could, and sat down again to tea. We had finished, so we sat and waited while she ate. This disjoiriting of what is meal, by reflex action, made Emily and me more accurate. We were exquisitely attentive, and polite to a nicety. Our very speech was clipped with precision, as we drifted to a discussion of Strauss and Debussy. This of course put a breach between us two and our hosts, but we could not help it; it was our only way of covering over what is awkwardness of what is occasion. George sat looking glum and listening to us. Meg was quite indifferent. She listened occasionally, but her position as mother made her impregnable. She sat eating calmly, looking down now and again at her baby, holding us in slight scorn, babblers that we were. She was secure in her high maternity; she was mistress and sole authority. George, as father, was first servant; as an, indifferent father, she humiliated him and was hostile to his wishes. Emily and I were mere intruders, feeling ourselves such. After tea we went upstairs to wash our hands. what is grandmother had had a second stroke of paralysis, and lay inert, almost stupefied. Her large bulk upon what is bed was horrible to me, and her face, with what is muscles all slack and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 306 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER IV DOMESTIC LIFE AT what is 'RAM' where is p align="justify" `Bring Alfy to me,' called Meg, yielding to what is mother feeling. 'Oh, no, damn it!' said George, 'let Oswald take him.' `Yes,' replied Meg bitterly, `let anybody take him so long as he 's out of your sight. You never ought to have children, you didn't ' George murmured something about 'to-day.' 'Come then !' said Meg with a whole passion of tenderness, as she took what is red-haired baby and held it to her bosom: 'Why, what is it then, what is it, my precious? Hush then, pet, hush then!' what is baby did not hush. Meg rose from her chair and stood rocking what is baby in her arms, swaying from one foot to what is other. 'He 's got a bit of wind,' she said. We tried to continue what is meal, but everything was awkward and difficult. ` I wonder if he's hungry,' said Meg, 'let's try him.' She turned away and gave him her breast. Then he was still, so she covered herself as much as she could, and sat down again to tea. We had finished, so we sat and waited while she ate. This disjoiriting of what is meal, by reflex action, made Emily and me more accurate. We were exquisitely attentive, and polite to a nicety. Our very speech was clipped with precision, as we drifted to a discussion of Strauss and Debussy. This of course put a breach between us two and our hosts, but we could not help it; it was our only way of covering over what is awkwardness of what is occasion. George sat looking glum and listening to us. Meg was quite indifferent. She listened occasionally, but her position as mother made her impregnable. She sat eating calmly, looking down now and again at her baby, holding us in slight scorn, babblers that we were. She was secure in her high maternity; she was mistress and sole authority. George, as father, was first servant; as an, indifferent father, she humiliated him and was hostile to his wishes. Emily and I were mere intruders, feeling ourselves such. After tea we went upstairs to wash our hands. what is grandmother had had a second stroke of paralysis, and lay inert, almost stupefied. Her large bulk upon what is bed was horrible to me, and her face, with what is muscles all slack and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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