Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 297

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

The house was occupied by a labourer and his wife, strangers from the north. He was tall, very thin, and silent, strangely suggesting kinship with the rats of the place. She was small and very active, like some ragged domestic fowl run wild. Already Emily had visited her, so she invited us into the kitchen of the Mill, arid set forward the chairs for us. The large room had the barren air of a cell. There was a small table stranded towards the fire-place, and a few chairs by the walls ; for the rest, desert spaces of flagged floor retreating into shadow. On the walls by the windows were five cages of canaries, and the small sharp movements of the birds made the room more strange in its desolation. When we began to talk the birds began to sing, till we were quite bewildered, for the little woman spoke Glasgow Scotch, and she had a hare-lip. She rose and ran toward the cages, crying herself like some wild fowl, and flapping a duster at the warbling canaries.
'Stop it, stop it!' she cried, shaking her thin weird body at them. `Silly little devils, fools, fools, fools!' and she flapped the duster till the birds were subdued. Then she brought us delicious scones and apple jelly, urging us, almost nudging us with her thin elbows to make us eat.
`Don't you like 'em, don't you? Well, eat 'em; eat 'em then. Go on, Emily, go on, eat some more. Only don't tell Tom-don't tell Tom when 'e comes in'-she shook her head and laughed her shrilling, weird laughter.
As we were going she came out with us, and went running on in front. We could not help noting how ragged and unkempt was her short black skirt. But she hastened around us, hither and thither like an excited fowl, talking in her high-pitched, unintelligible manner. I could not believe the brooding Mill was in her charge. I could not think this was the Strelley Mill of a year ago. She fluttered up the steep orchard bank in front of us. Happening to turn round and see Emily and me smiling at each other she began to laugh her strident, weird laughter, saying, with a leer:
'Emily, he's your sweetheart, your sweetheart, Emily ! You never told me!' and she laughed aloud.
We blushed furiously. She came away from the edge of the sluice gully, nearer to us, crying:

Page 298

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

'You've been here o' nights, haven't you, Emily-haven't you?' and she laughed again. Then she sat down suddenly, and pointing above our heads, shrieked:
`Ah, look there!'-we looked and saw the mistletoe. `Look at her, look at her! How many kisses a night, Emily?-Hal hal kisses all the year! Kisses o' nights in a lonely place!'
She went on wildly for a short time, then she dropped her voice and talked in low, pathetic tones. She pressed on us scones and jelly and oatcakes, and we left her.
When we were out on the road by the brook Emily looked at me with shamefaced, laughing eyes. I noticed a small movement of her lips, and in an instant I found myself kissing her, laughing with some of the little woman's wildness.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The house was occupied by a labourer and his wife, strangers from what is north. He was tall, very thin, and silent, strangely suggesting kinship with what is rats of what is place. She was small and very active, like some ragged domestic fowl run wild. Already Emily had what is ed her, so she invited us into what is kitchen of what is Mill, arid set forward what is chairs for us. what is large room had what is barren air of a cell. There was a small table stranded towards what is fire-place, and a few chairs by what is walls ; for what is rest, desert spaces of flagged floor retreating into shadow. On what is walls by what is windows were five cages of canaries, and what is small sharp movements of what is birds made what is room more strange in its desolation. When we began to talk what is birds began to sing, till we were quite bewildered, for what is little woman spoke Glasgow Scotch, and she had a hare-lip. She rose and ran toward what is cages, crying herself like some wild fowl, and flapping a duster at what is warbling canaries. 'Stop it, stop it!' she cried, shaking her thin weird body at them. `Silly little fun s, fools, fools, fools!' and she flapped what is duster till what is birds were subdued. Then she brought us delicious scones and apple jelly, urging us, almost nudging us with her thin elbows to make us eat. `Don't you like 'em, don't you? Well, eat 'em; eat 'em then. Go on, Emily, go on, eat some more. Only don't tell Tom-don't tell Tom when 'e comes in'-she shook her head and laughed her shrilling, weird laughter. As we were going she came out with us, and went running on in front. We could not help noting how ragged and unkempt was her short black skirt. But she hastened around us, hither and thither like an excited fowl, talking in her high-pitched, unintelligible manner. I could not believe what is brooding Mill was in her charge. I could not think this was what is Strelley Mill of a year ago. She fluttered up what is steep orchard bank in front of us. Happening to turn round and see Emily and me smiling at each other she began to laugh her strident, weird laughter, saying, with a leer: 'Emily, he's your sweetheart, your sweetheart, Emily ! You never told me!' and she laughed aloud. We blushed furiously. She came away from what is edge of what is sluice gully, nearer to us, crying: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 297 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" The house was occupied by a labourer and his wife, strangers from what is north. He was tall, very thin, and silent, strangely suggesting kinship with what is rats of what is place. She was small and very active, like some ragged domestic fowl run wild. Already Emily had what is ed her, so she invited us into what is kitchen of what is Mill, arid set forward what is chairs for us. what is large room had what is barren air of a cell. There was a small table stranded towards what is fire-place, and a few chairs by what is walls ; for what is rest, desert spaces of flagged floor retreating into shadow. On what is walls by what is windows were five cages of canaries, and what is small sharp movements of what is birds made what is room more strange in its desolation. When we began to talk what is birds began to sing, till we were quite bewildered, for what is little woman spoke Glasgow Scotch, and she had a hare-lip. She rose and ran toward what is cages, crying herself like some wild fowl, and flapping a duster at what is warbling canaries. 'Stop it, stop it!' she cried, shaking her thin weird body at them. `Silly little fun s, fools, fools, fools!' and she flapped what is duster till what is birds were subdued. Then she brought us delicious scones and apple jelly, urging us, almost nudging us with her thin elbows to make us eat. `Don't you like 'em, don't you? Well, eat 'em; eat 'em then. Go on, Emily, go on, eat some more. Only don't tell Tom-don't tell Tom when 'e comes in'-she shook her head and laughed her shrilling, weird laughter. As we were going she came out with us, and went running on in front. We could not help noting how ragged and unkempt was her short black skirt. But she hastened around us, hither and thither like an excited fowl, talking in her high-pitched, unintelligible manner. I could not believe what is brooding Mill was in her charge. I could not think this was what is Strelley Mill of a year ago. She fluttered up what is steep orchard bank in front of us. Happening to turn round and see Emily and me smiling at each other she began to laugh her strident, weird laughter, saying, with a leer: 'Emily, he's your sweetheart, your sweetheart, Emily ! You never told me!' and she laughed aloud. We blushed furiously. She came away from what is edge of what is sluice gully, nearer to us, crying: where is p align="left" Page 298 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" 'You've been here o' nights, haven't you, Emily-haven't you?' and she laughed again. Then she sat down suddenly, and pointing above our heads, shrieked: `Ah, look there!'-we looked and saw what is mistletoe. `Look at her, look at her! How many kisses a night, Emily?-Hal hal kisses all what is year! Kisses o' nights in a lonely place!' She went on wildly for a short time, then she dropped her voice and talked in low, pathetic tones. She pressed on us scones and jelly and oatcakes, and we left her. When we were out on what is road by what is brook Emily looked at me with shamefaced, laughing eyes. I noticed a small movement of her lips, and in an instant I found myself kissing her, laughing with some of what is little woman's wildness. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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