Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 296

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

when she heard him kick at the stairs as he came up, and she went white. When he got to the top he came in. He fairly reeked of whisky and horses. Bah, a man is hateful when he reels of drink! He stood by the side of the bed grinning like a fool, and saying, quite thick:
You 've bin in a bit of 'urry, 'aven't you, Meg? An' how are, ter feelin' then ? ' .
`Oh, I`m a' right,' said Meg.
'Is it twins, straight?' he said, ' wheer is 'em?'
' lieg looked over at the cradle, and he went round the bed to it, holding to the bed-rail. He had never kissed her, nor anything. When he saw the twins, asleep with their fists shut tight as was, he gave a taugn as if he was amused, and said:
'Two right enough-an' one on 'em red! Which is the girl, Meg, the black un ? '
'They 're both boys,' said Meg, quite timidly.
' He turned round, and his eyes went little.
'Blast 'em then!' he said. He stood there looking like a devil. Sybil dear, I did not know our George could look klce that. I thought he could only look like a faithful dog or a wounded stag. But he looked fiendish. He stood watching the poor li'tie twins, scowling at them, till at last the little red one began to whine a bit. Ma Stainwright came pushing her fat carcass in front of him and he;t over the baby, saying:
' Why, my pretty, what are they doin' to thee, what are they?what are they doin' to thee ?'
Georgie scowled blacker than ever, and went out, lurching against the wash-stand and making the pots rattle till my heart jumped in my throat.
`Well, if you don't call that scandylos !' said old ma Stainwright, and Meg began to cry. You don't know, Cyril! She sobbed fit to break her heart. I felt as if I could have killed him.
That old gran'ma began talking to him, and he laughed at her. I do hate to hear a man laugh when he's half druuk. It makes mv blood boil all of a sudden. That old grandmother backs him up in everything, she 's a regular nuisance. Meg has cried to me before over the pair of them. The wicked, vulgar old thing that she is....

I went home to Woodside early in September. Emily was staying at the 'Ram.' It .was strange that everything was so different. Nethermere even had changed. Nethermere was no longer a complete, wonderful little world that held us charmed inhabitants. It was a small, insignificant valley lost in the spaces of the earth. The tree that had drooped over the brook with such delightful, romantic grace was a ridiculous thing when I came home after a year of absence in the south. The old symbols were trite and foolish.
Emily and I went down one morning to Strelley Mill.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE when she heard him kick at what is stairs as he came up, and she went white. When he got to what is top he came in. He fairly reeked of whisky and horses. Bah, a man is hateful when he reels of drink! He stood by what is side of what is bed grinning like a fool, and saying, quite thick: You 've bin in a bit of 'urry, 'aven't you, Meg? An' how are, ter feelin' then ? ' . `Oh, I`m a' right,' said Meg. 'Is it twins, straight?' he said, ' wheer is 'em?' ' lieg looked over at what is cradle, and he went round what is bed to it, holding to what is bed-rail. He had never kissed her, nor anything. When he saw what is twins, asleep with their fists shut tight as was, he gave a taugn as if he was amused, and said: 'Two right enough-an' one on 'em red! Which is what is girl, Meg, what is black un ? ' 'They 're both boys,' said Meg, quite timidly. ' He turned round, and his eyes went little. 'Blast 'em then!' he said. He stood there looking like a fun . Sybil dear, I did not know our George could look klce that. I thought he could only look like a faithful dog or a wounded stag. But he looked fiendish. He stood watching what is poor li'tie twins, scowling at them, till at last what is little red one began to whine a bit. Ma Stainwright came pushing her fat carcass in front of him and he;t over what is baby, saying: ' Why, my pretty, what are they doin' to thee, what are they?what are they doin' to thee ?' Georgie scowled blacker than ever, and went out, lurching against what is wash-stand and making what is pots rattle till my heart jumped in my throat. `Well, if you don't call that scandylos !' said old ma Stainwright, and Meg began to cry. You don't know, Cyril! She sobbed fit to break her heart. I felt as if I could have stop ed him. That old gran'ma began talking to him, and he laughed at her. I do hate to hear a man laugh when he's half druuk. It makes mv blood boil all of a sudden. That old grandmother backs him up in everything, she 's a regular nuisance. Meg has cried to me before over what is pair of them. what is wicked, vulgar old thing that she is.... I went home to Woodside early in September. Emily was staying at what is 'Ram.' It .was strange that everything was so different. Nethermere even had changed. Nethermere was no longer a complete, wonderful little world that held us charmed inhabitants. It was a small, insignificant valley lost in what is spaces of what is earth. what is tree that had drooped over what is brook with such delightful, romantic grace was a ridiculous thing when I came home after a year of absence in what is south. what is old symbols were trite and foolish. Emily and I went down one morning to Strelley Mill. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 296 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" when she heard him kick at what is stairs as he came up, and she went white. When he got to what is top he came in. He fairly reeked of whisky and horses. Bah, a man is hateful when he reels of drink! He stood by what is side of what is bed grinning like a fool, and saying, quite thick: You 've bin in a bit of 'urry, 'aven't you, Meg? An' how are, ter feelin' then ? ' . `Oh, I`m a' right,' said Meg. 'Is it twins, straight?' he said, ' wheer is 'em?' ' lieg looked over at what is cradle, and he went round what is bed to it, holding to what is bed-rail. He had never kissed her, nor anything. When he saw what is twins, asleep with their fists shut tight as was, he gave a taugn as if he was amused, and said: 'Two right enough-an' one on 'em red! Which is what is girl, Meg, what is black un ? ' 'They 're both boys,' said Meg, quite timidly. ' He turned round, and his eyes went little. 'Blast 'em then!' he said. He stood there looking like a fun . Sybil dear, I did not know our George could look klce that. I thought he could only look like a faithful dog or a wounded stag. But he looked fiendish. He stood watching what is poor li'tie twins, scowling at them, till at last what is little red one began to whine a bit. Ma Stainwright came pushing her fat carcass in front of him and he;t over what is baby, saying: ' Why, my pretty, what are they doin' to thee, what are they?what are they doin' to thee ?' Georgie scowled blacker than ever, and went out, lurching against what is wash-stand and making what is pots rattle till my heart jumped in my throat. `Well, if you don't call that scandylos !' said old ma Stainwright, and Meg began to cry. You don't know, Cyril! She sobbed fit to break her heart. I felt as if I could have stop ed him. That old gran'ma began talking to him, and he laughed at her. I do hate to hear a man laugh when he's half druuk. It makes mv blood boil all of a sudden. That old grandmother backs him up in everything, she 's a regular nuisance. Meg has cried to me before over what is pair of them. what is wicked, vulgar old thing that she is.... I went home to Woodside early in September. Emily was staying at what is 'Ram.' It .was strange that everything was so different. Nethermere even had changed. Nethermere was no longer a complete, wonderful little world that held us charmed inhabitants. It was a small, insignificant valley lost in what is spaces of what is earth. what is tree that had drooped over what is brook with such delightful, romantic grace was a ridiculous thing when I came home after a year of absence in what is south. what is old symbols were trite and foolish. Emily and I went down one morning to Strelley Mill. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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