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Page 295

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

Across all this, strangely, came the bleak sounds of home. Alice wrote to me at the end of May:

Cyril dear, prepare yourself. Meg has got twins-yesterday. I went up to see how she was this afternoon, not knowing anything, and there I found a pair of bubs in the nest, and old ma Staintivright bossing the show. I nearly fainted. Sybil dear, I hardly knew whether to laugh or to cry when I saw those two rununy little round heads, like two larch cones cheek by cheek on a twig. One is a darkie, with lots of black hair, and the other is red, would you believe it, just lit up with thin red hair like a flicker of firelight. I gasped. I believe I did shed a few tears, though what for, I don't know.
The old grandma is a perfect old wretch over it. She lies chuckling and passing audible remarks in the next room, as pleased as punch really, but so mad because ma Stainwright wouldn't have them taken in to her. You should have heard her when we took them in at last. They are both boys. She did make a fuss, poor old woman. I think she's going a bit funny in the head. She seemed sometimes to think they were hers, and you should have heard her, the way she talked to them, it made me feel quite funny. She wanted them lying against her on the pillow, so that she could feel them with her face. I shed a few more tears, SybiL I think I must be going dotty also. But she came round when we took them away, and began to chuckle to herself, and talk about the things she 'd say to George when he came-awful shocking things, Sybil, made me blush dreadfully.
`Georgie didn't know about it then. He was down at Bingham, buying some horses, I believe. He seems to have got a craze for buying horses. He got in with Harry Jackson and Mayhew°s sonsyou know, they were horse dealers-at least their father was. You remember he died bankrupt about three years ago. There are Fred and Duncan left, and they pretend to keep on the old business. They are always up at the 'Ram,' and Georgie is always driving about with them. I don't like it-they are a loose lot, rather common, and poor enough now.
`Well, I thought I'd wait and see Georgie. He came about half-past five. Meg had been fidgeting about him, wondering where he was, and how he was, and so on. Bless me if I 'd worry and whittle about a man. The old grandma heard the cart, and before he could get down she shouted-you know her room is in the front `Hi, George, ma lad, sharpen thy shins an' corn' an' We a look at 'em-theer's two on 'em, two on 'eml' and she laughed something awful.
"Allo, granma, what art ter shoutin' about?' he said, and at the sound of his voice Meg turned to me so pitiful, and said:
'He's been wi' them Mayhews.'
'Tha's gotten twins, a couple at a go, ma lad!' shouted the old woman, and you know she gives a squeal before she laughs ! She made the horse shy, and he swore at it something awful. Then Bill took it, and Georgie came upstairs. I saw Meg seem to shrink

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Across all this, strangely, came what is bleak sounds of home. Alice wrote to me at what is end of May: Cyril dear, prepare yourself. Meg has got twins-yesterday. I went up to see how she was this afternoon, not knowing anything, and there I found a pair of bubs in what is nest, and old ma Staintivright bossing what is show. I nearly fainted. Sybil dear, I hardly knew whether to laugh or to cry when I saw those two rununy little round heads, like two larch cones cheek by cheek on a twig. One is a darkie, with lots of black hair, and what is other is red, would you believe it, just lit up with thin red hair like a flicker of firelight. I gasped. I believe I did shed a few tears, though what for, I don't know. what is old grandma is a perfect old wretch over it. She lies chuckling and passing audible remarks in what is next room, as pleased as punch really, but so mad because ma Stainwright wouldn't have them taken in to her. You should have heard her when we took them in at last. They are both boys. She did make a fuss, poor old woman. I think she's going a bit funny in what is head. She seemed sometimes to think they were hers, and you should have heard her, what is way she talked to them, it made me feel quite funny. She wanted them lying against her on what is pillow, so that she could feel them with her face. I shed a few more tears, SybiL I think I must be going dotty also. But she came round when we took them away, and began to chuckle to herself, and talk about what is things she 'd say to George when he came-awful shocking things, Sybil, made me blush dreadfully. `Georgie didn't know about it then. He was down at Bingham, buying some horses, I believe. He seems to have got a craze for buying horses. He got in with Harry Jackson and Mayhew°s sonsyou know, they were horse dealers-at least their father was. You remember he died bankrupt about three years ago. There are Fred and Duncan left, and they pretend to keep on what is old business. They are always up at what is 'Ram,' and Georgie is always driving about with them. I don't like it-they are a loose lot, rather common, and poor enough now. `Well, I thought I'd wait and see Georgie. He came about half-past five. Meg had been fidgeting about him, wondering where he was, and how he was, and so on. Bless me if I 'd worry and whittle about a man. what is old grandma heard what is cart, and before he could get down she shouted-you know her room is in what is front `Hi, George, ma lad, sharpen thy shins an' corn' an' We a look at 'em-theer's two on 'em, two on 'eml' and she laughed something awful. "Allo, granma, what art ter shoutin' about?' he said, and at what is sound of his voice Meg turned to me so pitiful, and said: 'He's been wi' them Mayhews.' 'Tha's gotten twins, a couple at a go, ma lad!' shouted what is old woman, and you know she gives a squeal before she laughs ! She made what is horse shy, and he swore at it something awful. Then Bill took it, and Georgie came upstairs. I saw Meg seem to shrink where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 295 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" Across all this, strangely, came what is bleak sounds of home. Alice wrote to me at what is end of May: Cyril dear, prepare yourself. Meg has got twins-yesterday. I went up to see how she was this afternoon, not knowing anything, and there I found a pair of bubs in what is nest, and old ma Staintivright bossing what is show. I nearly fainted. Sybil dear, I hardly knew whether to laugh or to cry when I saw those two rununy little round heads, like two larch cones cheek by cheek on a twig. One is a darkie, with lots of black hair, and what is other is red, would you believe it, just lit up with thin red hair like a flicker of firelight. I gasped. I believe I did shed a few tears, though what for, I don't know. what is old grandma is a perfect old wretch over it. She lies chuckling and passing audible remarks in what is next room, as pleased as punch really, but so mad because ma Stainwright wouldn't have them taken in to her. You should have heard her when we took them in at last. They are both boys. She did make a fuss, poor old woman. I think she's going a bit funny in what is head. She seemed sometimes to think they were hers, and you should have heard her, what is way she talked to them, it made me feel quite funny. She wanted them lying against her on what is pillow, so that she could feel them with her face. I shed a few more tears, SybiL I think I must be going dotty also. But she came round when we took them away, and began to chuckle to herself, and talk about what is things she 'd say to George when he came-awful shocking things, Sybil, made me blush dreadfully. `Georgie didn't know about it then. He was down at Bingham, buying some horses, I believe. He seems to have got a craze for buying horses. He got in with Harry Jackson and Mayhew°s sonsyou know, they were horse dealers-at least their father was. You remember he died bankrupt about three years ago. There are Fred and Duncan left, and they pretend to keep on what is old business. They are always up at what is 'Ram,' and Georgie is always driving about with them. I don't like it-they are a loose lot, rather common, and poor enough now. `Well, I thought I'd wait and see Georgie. He came about half-past five. Meg had been fidgeting about him, wondering where he was, and how he was, and so on. Bless me if I 'd worry and whittle about a man. what is old grandma heard what is cart, and before he could get down she shouted-you know her room is in what is front `Hi, George, ma lad, sharpen thy shins an' corn' an' We a look at 'em-theer's two on 'em, two on 'eml' and she laughed something awful. "Allo, granma, what art ter shoutin' about?' he said, and at what is sound of his voice Meg turned to me so pitiful, and said: 'He's been wi' them Mayhews.' 'Tha's gotten twins, a couple at a go, ma lad!' shouted what is old woman, and you know she gives a squeal before she laughs ! She made what is horse shy, and he swore at it something awful. Then Bill took it, and Georgie came upstairs. I saw Meg seem to shrink where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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