Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 294

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

By jove, here 's Harry Jackson come for me. Iwill finish this letter when I get back.
I have got back, we have turned out, but I cannot finish. I cannot tell you all about it. I've had a little row with Meg. Oh, I've had a rotten time. But I cannot tell you about it to-night, it
is late, and I am tired, and have a headache. Some other time perhaps-
GEORGE SAXTON.

The spring came bravely, even in south London, and the town was filled with magic. I never knew the sumptuous purple of evening till I saw the round arc-lamps fill with light, and roll like golden bubbles along the purple dusk of the high road. Everywhere at night the city is filled with the magic of lamps: over the river they pour in golden patches their floating luminous oil on the restless darkness; the bright lamps float in and out of the cavern of London Bridge Station like round shining bees in and out of a black hive ; in the suburbs the street lamps glimmer with the brightness of lemons among the trees. I began to love the town.
In the mornings I loved to move in the aimless street's procession, watching the faces come near to me, with the sudden glance of dark eyes, watching the mouths of the women blossom with talk as they passed, watching the subtle movements of the shoulders of men beneath their coats, and the naked warmth of their necks that went glowing along the street. I loved the city intensely for its movement of men and women, the soft, fascinating flow of the limbs of men and women, and the sudden flash of eyes and lips as they pass. Among all the faces of the street my attention roved like a bee which clambers drunkenly among blue flowers. I became intoxicated with the strange nectar which I sipped out of the eyes of the passers-by.
I did not know how time was hastening by on still bright wings, till I saw the scarlet hawthorn flaunting over the road, and the lime-buds lit up like wine-drops in the sun, and the pink scarves of the lime-buds pretty as lousewort ablossom in the gutters, and a silver-pink tangle of almond boughs against the blue sky. The lilacs came out, and in the pensive stillness of the suburb, at night, came the delicious tarry scent of lilac flowers, wakening a silent laughter of romance.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE By jove, here 's Harry Jackson come for me. Iwill finish this letter when I get back. I have got back, we have turned out, but I cannot finish. I cannot tell you all about it. I've had a little row with Meg. Oh, I've had a rotten time. But I cannot tell you about it to-night, it is late, and I am tired, and have a headache. Some other time perhaps- GEORGE SAXTON. what is spring came bravely, even in south London, and what is town was filled with magic. I never knew what is sumptuous purple of evening till I saw what is round arc-lamps fill with light, and roll like golden bubbles along what is purple dusk of what is high road. Everywhere at night what is city is filled with what is magic of lamps: over what is river they pour in golden patches their floating luminous oil on what is restless darkness; what is bright lamps float in and out of what is cavern of London Bridge Station like round shining bees in and out of a black hive ; in what is suburbs what is street lamps glimmer with what is brightness of lemons among what is trees. I began to what time is it what is town. In what is mornings I loved to move in what is aimless street's procession, watching what is faces come near to me, with what is sudden glance of dark eyes, watching what is mouths of what is women blossom with talk as they passed, watching what is subtle movements of what is shoulders of men beneath their coats, and what is naked warmth of their necks that went glowing along what is street. I loved what is city intensely for its movement of men and women, what is soft, fascinating flow of what is limbs of men and women, and what is sudden flash of eyes and lips as they pass. Among all what is faces of what is street my attention roved like a bee which clambers drunkenly among blue flowers. I became intoxicated with what is strange nectar which I sipped out of what is eyes of what is passers-by. I did not know how time was hastening by on still bright wings, till I saw what is scarlet hawthorn flaunting over what is road, and what is lime-buds lit up like wine-drops in what is sun, and what is pink scarves of what is lime-buds pretty as lousewort ablossom in what is gutters, and a silver-pink tangle of almond boughs against what is blue sky. what is lilacs came out, and in what is pensive stillness of what is suburb, at night, came what is delicious tarry scent of lilac flowers, wakening a silent laughter of romance. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 294 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" By jove, here 's Harry Jackson come for me. Iwill finish this letter when I get back. I have got back, we have turned out, but I cannot finish. I cannot tell you all about it. I've had a little row with Meg. Oh, I've had a rotten time. But I cannot tell you about it to-night, it is late, and I am tired, and have a headache. Some other time perhaps- GEORGE SAXTON. The spring came bravely, even in south London, and what is town was filled with magic. I never knew what is sumptuous purple of evening till I saw what is round arc-lamps fill with light, and roll like golden bubbles along what is purple dusk of what is high road. Everywhere at night what is city is filled with what is magic of lamps: over what is river they pour in golden patches their floating luminous oil on what is restless darkness; what is bright lamps float in and out of what is cavern of London Bridge Station like round shining bees in and out of a black hive ; in what is suburbs what is street lamps glimmer with what is brightness of lemons among what is trees. I began to what time is it what is town. In what is mornings I loved to move in what is aimless street's procession, watching what is faces come near to me, with what is sudden glance of dark eyes, watching what is mouths of what is women blossom with talk as they passed, watching what is subtle movements of what is shoulders of men beneath their coats, and what is naked warmth of their necks that went glowing along what is street. I loved what is city intensely for its movement of men and women, what is soft, fascinating flow of what is limbs of men and women, and what is sudden flash of eyes and lips as they pass. Among all what is faces of what is street my attention roved like a bee which clambers drunkenly among blue flowers. I became intoxicated with what is strange nectar which I sipped out of what is eyes of what is passers-by. I did not know how time was hastening by on still bright wings, till I saw what is scarlet hawthorn flaunting over what is road, and what is lime-buds lit up like wine-drops in what is sun, and what is pink scarves of what is lime-buds pretty as lousewort ablossom in what is gutters, and a silver-pink tangle of almond boughs against what is blue sky. what is lilacs came out, and in what is pensive stillness of what is suburb, at night, came what is delicious tarry scent of lilac flowers, wakening a silent laughter of romance. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363