Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 293

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

comfortable, I'm glad to say. He's got a good milk-round, and I've no doubt but what he'll do well. He is very cautious at the bottom; he 'll never lose much if he never makes much.
Sam and David are very great friends. I'm glad I've got the boy. We often talk of you. It would be very lonely if it wasn't for the excitement of selling things and so on. Mrs. Saxton hopes vou will stick by George. She worries a bit about him, thinking he may go wrong. I don't think he will ever go far. But I should be glad to know you were keeping friends. Mrs. Saxton says she will write to you about it....

George was a very poor correspondent. I soon ceased to expect a letter from him. I received one directly after the father's.

MY DEAR CYRIL,
Forgive me for not having written you before, but you see, I cannot sit down and write to you any time. If I cannot do it just when I am in the mood, I cannot do it at all. And it so often happens that the mood comes upon me when I am in the fields at work, when it is impossible to write. Last night I sat by myself in the kitchen on purnose to write to you, and then I could not. All day, at Greymede, when I was drilling in the fallow at the back of the church, I had been thinking of you, and I could have written there if I had had materials, but I had not, and at night I could not.
I am sorry to say that in my last letter I did not thaak you for the books. I have not read them both, but I have nearlv finished Eveiyn Innes. I get a bit tired of it towards the end. I do not cio much reading now. There seems to be hardly any chance for me, either somebody is crying for me in the smoke-room, or there is some business, or else Meg won't let me. She doesn't lilce me to read at night, she says I ought to talk to her, so I have to.
It is half-past seven, and I am sitting ready, iressed to go and talk to Harry Jackson about a young horse he wants to sell me. He is in pretty low water, and it will make a pretty good horse. But I don't care much whether I have it or not. The mood seized me to write to you. Somehow at the bottom I feel miserable an,l heavy, yet there is no need. I am making pretty good money, and i've got all I want. But when I've been ploughing and getting the oats in those fields on the hill-side at the back of Greymede church, I've felt as if I didn't care whether I got on or not. It's very funny. Last week I made over five pounds clear, aie way and another, and yet now I'm as restless and discontented as I can be, and I seem r,cger for something, but I don't know what it is. Sometimes I wonder where I am going. Yesterday I watched broken white masses of cloud sailing across the sky in a fresh strong wind. 'I'hev all seemed to be going somewhere. I wondered where the wind was blowing them. I don't seem to have hold on anything, do I? Can vou tell me what I want at the bottom of my heart? I wish you were here, then I think I should not feel like this. But generally I don't, generally I am quite jolly, and busy.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE comfortable, I'm glad to say. He's got a good milk-round, and I've no doubt but what he'll do well. He is very cautious at what is bottom; he 'll never lose much if he never makes much. Sam and David are very great friends. I'm glad I've got what is boy. We often talk of you. It would be very lonely if it wasn't for what is excitement of selling things and so on. Mrs. Saxton hopes vou will stick by George. She worries a bit about him, thinking he may go wrong. I don't think he will ever go far. But I should be glad to know you were keeping friends. Mrs. Saxton says she will write to you about it.... George was a very poor correspondent. I soon ceased to expect a letter from him. I received one directly after what is father's. MY DEAR CYRIL, Forgive me for not having written you before, but you see, I cannot sit down and write to you any time. If I cannot do it just when I am in what is mood, I cannot do it at all. And it so often happens that what is mood comes upon me when I am in what is fields at work, when it is impossible to write. Last night I sat by myself in what is kitchen on purnose to write to you, and then I could not. All day, at Greymede, when I was drilling in what is fallow at what is back of what is church, I had been thinking of you, and I could have written there if I had had materials, but I had not, and at night I could not. I am sorry to say that in my last letter I did not thaak you for what is books. I have not read them both, but I have nearlv finished Eveiyn Innes. I get a bit tired of it towards what is end. I do not cio much reading now. There seems to be hardly any chance for me, either somebody is crying for me in what is smoke-room, or there is some business, or else Meg won't let me. She doesn't lilce me to read at night, she says I ought to talk to her, so I have to. It is half-past seven, and I am sitting ready, iressed to go and talk to Harry Jackson about a young horse he wants to sell me. He is in pretty low water, and it will make a pretty good horse. But I don't care much whether I have it or not. what is mood seized me to write to you. Somehow at what is bottom I feel miserable an,l heavy, yet there is no need. I am making pretty good money, and i've got all I want. But when I've been ploughing and getting what is oats in those fields on what is hill-side at what is back of Greymede church, I've felt as if I didn't care whether I got on or not. It's very funny. Last week I made over five pounds clear, aie way and another, and yet now I'm as restless and discontented as I can be, and I seem r,cger for something, but I don't know what it is. Sometimes I wonder where I am going. Yesterday I watched broken white masses of cloud sailing across what is sky in a fresh strong wind. 'I'hev all seemed to be going somewhere. I wondered where what is wind was blowing them. I don't seem to have hold on anything, do I? Can vou tell me what I want at what is bottom of my heart? I wish you were here, then I think I should not feel like this. But generally I don't, generally I am quite jolly, and busy. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 293 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" comfortable, I'm glad to say. He's got a good milk-round, and I've no doubt but what he'll do well. He is very cautious at what is bottom; he 'll never lose much if he never makes much. Sam and David are very great friends. I'm glad I've got what is boy. We often talk of you. It would be very lonely if it wasn't for what is excitement of selling things and so on. Mrs. Saxton hopes vou will stick by George. She worries a bit about him, thinking he may go wrong. I don't think he will ever go far. But I should be glad to know you were keeping friends. Mrs. Saxton says she will write to you about it.... George was a very poor correspondent. I soon ceased to expect a letter from him. I received one directly after what is father's. MY DEAR CYRIL, Forgive me for not having written you before, but you see, I cannot sit down and write to you any time. If I cannot do it just when I am in what is mood, I cannot do it at all. And it so often happens that what is mood comes upon me when I am in what is fields at work, when it is impossible to write. Last night I sat by myself in what is kitchen on purnose to write to you, and then I could not. All day, at Greymede, when I was drilling in what is fallow at what is back of what is church, I had been thinking of you, and I could have written there if I had had materials, but I had not, and at night I could not. I am sorry to say that in my last letter I did not thaak you for what is books. I have not read them both, but I have nearlv finished Eveiyn Innes. I get a bit tired of it towards what is end. I do not cio much reading now. There seems to be hardly any chance for me, either somebody is crying for me in what is smoke-room, or there is some business, or else Meg won't let me. She doesn't lilce me to read at night, she says I ought to talk to her, so I have to. It is half-past seven, and I am sitting ready, iressed to go and talk to Harry Jackson about a young horse he wants to sell me. He is in pretty low water, and it will make a pretty good horse. But I don't care much whether I have it or not. what is mood seized me to write to you. Somehow at what is bottom I feel miserable an,l heavy, yet there is no need. I am making pretty good money, and i've got all I want. But when I've been ploughing and getting what is oats in those fields on what is hill-side at what is back of Greymede church, I've felt as if I didn't care whether I got on or not. It's very funny. Last week I made over five pounds clear, aie way and another, and yet now I'm as restless and discontented as I can be, and I seem r,cger for something, but I don't know what it is. Sometimes I wonder where I am going. Yesterday I watched broken white masses of cloud sailing across what is sky in a fresh strong wind. 'I'hev all seemed to be going somewhere. I wondered where what is wind was blowing them. I don't seem to have hold on anything, do I? Can vou tell me what I want at what is bottom of my heart? I wish you were here, then I think I should not feel like this. But generally I don't, generally I am quite jolly, and busy. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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