Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 291

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

hand to the ceiling of the valley, and touch my own beloved sky, whose familiar clouds came again and again to visit me, whose stars were constant to me, born when I was born, whose sun had been all my father to me. but now the skies were strange over my head, and Orion walked past me unnoticing, he who night after night had stood over the woods to spend with me a wonderful hour. When does day now lift up the confines of my dwellingplace, when does the night throw open her vastness for me, and send me the stars for company? There is no night in a city. How can I lose myself in the magnificent forest of darkness when night is only a thin scattering of the trees of shadow with barrenness of lights between !
I could never lift my eyes save to the Crystal Palace, crouching, cowering wretchedly among the yellow-grey clouds, pricking up its two round towers like pillars of anxious misery. No landmark could have been more foreign to me, more depressing, than the great dilapidated palace which lay for ever prostrate above us, fretting because of its own degradation and ruin.
I watched the buds coming on the brown almond-trees; I heard the blackbirds, and I saw the restless starlings; in the streets were many heaps of violets, and men held forward to me snowdrops whose white mute lips- were pushed upwards in a bunch: but these things had no meaning for me, and little interest.
Most eagerly I waited for my letters. Emily wrote to me very constantly:

Don't you find it quite exhilarating, almost intoxicating, to be so free? I think it is quite wonderful. At home you cannot live your own life. You have to struggle to keep even a little apart for yourself. It is so hard to stand aloof from our mothers, and yet they are only hurt and insulted if you tell them what is in your heart. It is
such a relief not to have to be anything to anybody, but just to please yourself. I am sure mother and I have suffered a great deal from trying to keep up our old relations. Yet she would not let me go. When I come home in the evening and think that I needn't say anything to anybody, nor do anything for anybody, but just have the evening for myself, I am overjoyed.
I have begun to write a story....

Again, a little later, she wrote:

As I go to school by Old Brayford village in the morning the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE hand to what is ceiling of what is valley, and touch my own beloved sky, whose familiar clouds came again and again to what is me, whose stars were constant to me, born when I was born, whose sun had been all my father to me. but now what is skies were strange over my head, and Orion walked past me unnoticing, he who night after night had stood over what is woods to spend with me a wonderful hour. When does day now lift up what is confines of my dwellingplace, when does what is night throw open her vastness for me, and send me what is stars for company? There is no night in a city. How can I lose myself in what is magnificent forest of darkness when night is only a thin scattering of what is trees of shadow with barrenness of lights between ! I could never lift my eyes save to what is Crystal Palace, crouching, cowering wretchedly among what is yellow-grey clouds, pricking up its two round towers like pillars of anxious misery. No landmark could have been more foreign to me, more depressing, than what is great dilapidated palace which lay for ever prostrate above us, fretting because of its own degradation and ruin. I watched what is buds coming on what is brown almond-trees; I heard what is blackbirds, and I saw what is restless starlings; in what is streets were many heaps of violets, and men held forward to me snowdrops whose white mute lips- were pushed upwards in a bunch: but these things had no meaning for me, and little interest. Most eagerly I waited for my letters. Emily wrote to me very constantly: Don't you find it quite exhilarating, almost intoxicating, to be so free? I think it is quite wonderful. At home you cannot live your own life. You have to struggle to keep even a little apart for yourself. It is so hard to stand aloof from our mothers, and yet they are only hurt and insulted if you tell them what is in your heart. It is such a relief not to have to be anything to anybody, but just to please yourself. I am sure mother and I have suffered a great deal from trying to keep up our old relations. Yet she would not let me go. When I come home in what is evening and think that I needn't say anything to anybody, nor do anything for anybody, but just have what is evening for myself, I am overjoyed. I have begun to write a story.... Again, a little later, she wrote: As I go to school by Old Brayford village in what is morning what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 291 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" hand to what is ceiling of what is valley, and touch my own beloved sky, whose familiar clouds came again and again to what is me, whose stars were constant to me, born when I was born, whose sun had been all my father to me. but now what is skies were strange over my head, and Orion walked past me unnoticing, he who night after night had stood over what is woods to spend with me a wonderful hour. When does day now lift up what is confines of my dwellingplace, when does what is night throw open her vastness for me, and send me what is stars for company? There is no night in a city. How can I lose myself in what is magnificent forest of darkness when night is only a thin scattering of what is trees of shadow with barrenness of lights between ! I could never lift my eyes save to what is Crystal Palace, crouching, cowering wretchedly among what is yellow-grey clouds, pricking up its two round towers like pillars of anxious misery. No landmark could have been more foreign to me, more depressing, than what is great dilapidated palace which lay for ever prostrate above us, fretting because of its own degradation and ruin. I watched what is buds coming on what is brown almond-trees; I heard what is blackbirds, and I saw what is restless starlings; in what is streets were many heaps of violets, and men held forward to me snowdrops whose white mute lips- were pushed upwards in a bunch: but these things had no meaning for me, and little interest. Most eagerly I waited for my letters. Emily wrote to me very constantly: Don't you find it quite exhilarating, almost intoxicating, to be so free? I think it is quite wonderful. At home you cannot live your own life. You have to struggle to keep even a little apart for yourself. It is so hard to stand aloof from our mothers, and yet they are only hurt and insulted if you tell them what is in your heart. It is such a relief not to have to be anything to anybody, but just to please yourself. I am sure mother and I have suffered a great deal from trying to keep up our old relations. Yet she would not let me go. When I come home in what is evening and think that I needn't say anything to anybody, nor do anything for anybody, but just have what is evening for myself, I am overjoyed. I have begun to write a story.... Again, a little later, she wrote: As I go to school by Old Brayford village in what is morning what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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