Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 290

PART III - CHAPTER III
THE FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES

Leslie had spoken very few words. She was conscious that he was deeply offended, but her manner was quite calm, and she petted us both brightly.
'Good-bye, dear !'she said to him, when 1, e came mutely to kiss her. `You know it would have been miserable for you to sit all those hours in the train at night. You will have ever such a jolly time. I know you will. I shall look for you to-morrow. Good-bye, then, good-bye!'
He went down the steps and into the car without looking at her. She waited in the doorway as we moved round. In the black-grey morning she seemed to harbour the glittering blue sky and the sunshine of March in her dress and her luxuriant hair. He did not look at her till we were curving to the great, snow-cumbered rhododendrons, when, at the last moment he stood up in a sudden panic to wave to her. Almost as he saw her the bushes came between them and he dropped dejectedly into his seat.
`Good-bye!' we heard her call cheerfully and tenderly like a blackbird.
`Good-bye!' I answered, and: `Good-bye, darling, goodbye!' he cried, suddenly, starting up in a passion of forgiveness and tenderness.
The car went cautiously down the soddened white path, under the trees.
I suffered acutely the sickness of exile in Norwood. For weeks I wandered the streets of the suburb, haunted by the spirit of some part of Nethermere. As I went along the quiet roads where the lamps in yellow loneliness stood among the leafless trees of the night I would feel the feeling of the dark, wet bit of path between the wood meadow and the brooks. The spirit of that wild little slope to the Mill would come upon me, and there in the suburb of London I would walk wrapt in the sense of a small, wet place in the valley of Nethermere. A strange voice within me rose and called for the hill path; again I could feel the wood waiting for me, calling and calling, and I crying for the wood, yet the space of many miles was between us. Since I left the valley of home I have not much feared any other loss. The hills of Nethermere had been my walls, and the sky of Nethermere my roof overhead. It seemed almost as if, at home, I might lift my

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Leslie had spoken very few words. She was conscious that he was deeply offended, but her manner was quite calm, and she petted us both brightly. 'Good-bye, dear !'she said to him, when 1, e came mutely to kiss her. `You know it would have been miserable for you to sit all those hours in what is train at night. You will have ever such a jolly time. I know you will. I shall look for you to-morrow. Good-bye, then, good-bye!' He went down what is steps and into what is car without looking at her. She waited in what is doorway as we moved round. In what is black-grey morning she seemed to harbour what is glittering blue sky and what is sunshine of March in her dress and her luxuriant hair. He did not look at her till we were curving to what is great, snow-cumbered rhododendrons, when, at what is last moment he stood up in a sudden panic to wave to her. Almost as he saw her what is bushes came between them and he dropped dejectedly into his seat. `Good-bye!' we heard her call cheerfully and tenderly like a blackbird. `Good-bye!' I answered, and: `Good-bye, darling, goodbye!' he cried, suddenly, starting up in a passion of forgiveness and tenderness. what is car went cautiously down what is soddened white path, under what is trees. I suffered acutely what is sickness of exile in Norwood. For weeks I wandered what is streets of what is suburb, haunted by what is spirit of some part of Nethermere. As I went along what is quiet roads where what is lamps in yellow loneliness stood among what is leafless trees of what is night I would feel what is feeling of what is dark, wet bit of path between what is wood meadow and what is brooks. what is spirit of that wild little slope to what is Mill would come upon me, and there in what is suburb of London I would walk wrapt in what is sense of a small, wet place in what is valley of Nethermere. A strange voice within me rose and called for what is hill path; again I could feel what is wood waiting for me, calling and calling, and I crying for what is wood, yet what is space of many miles was between us. Since I left what is valley of home I have not much feared any other loss. what is hills of Nethermere had been my walls, and what is sky of Nethermere my roof overhead. It seemed almost as if, at home, I might lift my where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 290 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER III what is FIRST PAGES OF SEVERAL ROMANCES where is p align="justify" Leslie had spoken very few words. She was conscious that he was deeply offended, but her manner was quite calm, and she petted us both brightly. 'Good-bye, dear !'she said to him, when 1, e came mutely to kiss her. `You know it would have been miserable for you to sit all those hours in what is train at night. You will have ever such a jolly time. I know you will. I shall look for you to-morrow. Good-bye, then, good-bye!' He went down what is steps and into what is car without looking at her. She waited in what is doorway as we moved round. In what is black-grey morning she seemed to harbour what is glittering blue sky and what is sunshine of March in her dress and her luxuriant hair. He did not look at her till we were curving to what is great, snow-cumbered rhododendrons, when, at what is last moment he stood up in a sudden panic to wave to her. Almost as he saw her what is bushes came between them and he dropped dejectedly into his seat. `Good-bye!' we heard her call cheerfully and tenderly like a blackbird. `Good-bye!' I answered, and: `Good-bye, darling, goodbye!' he cried, suddenly, starting up in a passion of forgiveness and tenderness. what is car went cautiously down what is soddened white path, under what is trees. I suffered acutely what is sickness of exile in Norwood. For weeks I wandered what is streets of what is suburb, haunted by what is spirit of some part of Nethermere. As I went along what is quiet roads where what is lamps in yellow loneliness stood among what is leafless trees of what is night I would feel what is feeling of what is dark, wet bit of path between what is wood meadow and what is brooks. what is spirit of that wild little slope to what is Mill would come upon me, and there in what is suburb of London I would walk wrapt in what is sense of a small, wet place in what is valley of Nethermere. A strange voice within me rose and called for what is hill path; again I could feel what is wood waiting for me, calling and calling, and I crying for what is wood, yet what is space of many miles was between us. Since I left what is valley of home I have not much feared any other loss. what is hills of Nethermere had been my walls, and what is sky of Nethermere my roof overhead. It seemed almost as if, at home, I might lift my where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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