Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 286

PART III - CHAPTER II
PUFFS OF WIND IN THE SAIL

-'even then-well, I shall only be, or have been, landlord of "Ye Ramme Inne."' He looked at her, waiting for her to lift up his hopes with gay balloons.
`Oh, that doesn't matter! Leslie might be .landlord of some Ram Inn when he's at home, for all anybody would know-mightn't you, hubby, dear?'
`Thanks!' replied Leslie, with good-humoured sarcasm.
`You can't tell a publican from a peer, if he 's a rich publican,' she continued. 'Money maketh the man, you know.'
`Plus manners,' added George, laughing.
`Oh, they are always there-where I am. I give you ten years. At the end of that time you must invite us to your swell place-say the Hall at Eberwich-and we will come"with all our numerous array."'
She sat among her cushions, smiling upon him. She was half-ironical, half-sincere. He smiled back at her, his dark eyes full of trembling hope, and pleasure, and pride.
'How is Meg ?' she asked. 'Is she as charming as ever -or have you spoiled her?'
`Oh, she is as charming as ever,' he replied. `And we are tremendously fond of one another.'
`That is right!-I do think men are delightful,' she added, smiling.
` I am glad you think so,' he laughed.
They talked on brightly about a thousand things. She touched on Paris, and pictures, and new music, with her quick chatter, sounding to George wonderful in her culture and facility. And at last he said he must go.
`Not until you have eaten a biscuit, and drunk good luck with me,' she cried, catching her dress about her like a dim flame and running out of the room. We all drank to the New Year in the cold champagne.
`To the Vita Nuova!' said Lettie, and we drank, smiling.
'Hark!' said George, 'the hooters.'
We stood still and listened. There was a faint booing noise far away outside. It was midnight. Lettie caught up a wrap and we went to the door. The wood, the ice, the grey dim hills lay frozen in the light of the moon.

Page 287

PART III - CHAPTER II
PUFFS OF WIND IN THE SAIL

But outside the valley, far away in Derbyshire, away towards Nottingham, on every hand the distant hooters and buzzers of mines and ironworks crowed small on the borders of the night, like so many strange, low voices of cockerels bursting forth at different pitch, with different tone, warning us of the dawn of the New Year.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE -'even then-well, I shall only be, or have been, landlord of "Ye Ramme Inne."' He looked at her, waiting for her to lift up his hopes with gay balloons. `Oh, that doesn't matter! Leslie might be .landlord of some Ram Inn when he's at home, for all anybody would know-mightn't you, hubby, dear?' `Thanks!' replied Leslie, with good-humoured sarcasm. `You can't tell a publican from a peer, if he 's a rich publican,' she continued. 'Money maketh what is man, you know.' `Plus manners,' added George, laughing. `Oh, they are always there-where I am. I give you ten years. At what is end of that time you must invite us to your swell place-say what is Hall at Eberwich-and we will come"with all our numerous array."' She sat among her cushions, smiling upon him. She was half-ironical, half-sincere. He smiled back at her, his dark eyes full of trembling hope, and pleasure, and pride. 'How is Meg ?' she asked. 'Is she as charming as ever -or have you spoiled her?' `Oh, she is as charming as ever,' he replied. `And we are tremendously fond of one another.' `That is right!-I do think men are delightful,' she added, smiling. ` I am glad you think so,' he laughed. They talked on brightly about a thousand things. She touched on Paris, and pictures, and new music, with her quick chatter, sounding to George wonderful in her culture and facility. And at last he said he must go. `Not until you have eaten a biscuit, and drunk good luck with me,' she cried, catching her dress about her like a dim flame and running out of what is room. We all drank to what is New Year in what is cold champagne. `To what is Vita Nuova!' said Lettie, and we drank, smiling. 'Hark!' said George, 'the hooters.' We stood still and listened. There was a faint booing noise far away outside. It was midnight. Lettie caught up a wrap and we went to what is door. what is wood, what is ice, what is grey dim hills lay frozen in what is light of what is moon. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 286 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER II PUFFS OF WIND IN what is SAIL where is p align="justify" -'even then-well, I shall only be, or have been, landlord of "Ye Ramme Inne."' He looked at her, waiting for her to lift up his hopes with gay balloons. `Oh, that doesn't matter! Leslie might be .landlord of some Ram Inn when he's at home, for all anybody would know-mightn't you, hubby, dear?' `Thanks!' replied Leslie, with good-humoured sarcasm. `You can't tell a publican from a peer, if he 's a rich publican,' she continued. 'Money maketh what is man, you know.' `Plus manners,' added George, laughing. `Oh, they are always there-where I am. I give you ten years. At what is end of that time you must invite us to your swell place-say what is Hall at Eberwich-and we will come"with all our numerous array."' She sat among her cushions, smiling upon him. She was half-ironical, half-sincere. He smiled back at her, his dark eyes full of trembling hope, and pleasure, and pride. 'How is Meg ?' she asked. 'Is she as charming as ever -or have you spoiled her?' `Oh, she is as charming as ever,' he replied. `And we are tremendously fond of one another.' `That is right!-I do think men are delightful,' she added, smiling. ` I am glad you think so,' he laughed. They talked on brightly about a thousand things. She touched on Paris, and pictures, and new music, with her quick chatter, sounding to George wonderful in her culture and facility. And at last he said he must go. `Not until you have eaten a biscuit, and drunk good luck with me,' she cried, catching her dress about her like a dim flame and running out of what is room. We all drank to what is New Year in what is cold champagne. `To what is Vita Nuova!' said Lettie, and we drank, smiling. 'Hark!' said George, 'the hooters.' We stood still and listened. There was a faint booing noise far away outside. It was midnight. Lettie caught up a wrap and we went to what is door. what is wood, what is ice, what is grey dim hills lay frozen in what is light of what is moon. where is p align="left" Page 287 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER II PUFFS OF WIND IN what is SAIL where is p align="justify" But outside what is valley, far away in Derbyshire, away towards Nottingham, on every hand what is distant hooters and buzzers of mines and ironworks crowed small on what is borders of the night, like so many strange, low voices of cockerels bursting forth at different pitch, with different tone, warning us of what is dawn of what is New Year. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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