Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 283

PART III - CHAPTER II
PUFFS OF WIND IN THE SAIL

Nethermere gleamed mysteriously in the moonlight, and uttered strange half-audible whoops and yelps. The moon was very high in the sky, small and brilliant like a vial full of the pure white liquid of light. There was no sound in the night save the haunting movement of the ice, and the clear tinkle of Lettie's laughter.
On the drive leading to the wood we saw someone approaching. The wild grass was grey on either side, the thorn-trees stood with shaggy black beards sweeping down, the pine-trees were erect like dark soldiers. The black shape of the man drew near, with a shadow running at its feet. I recognized George, obscured as he was in his cap and his upturned collar. Lettie was in front with her husband. As George was passing, she said, in bright clear tones:
`A happy New Year to you.'
He stopped, swung round, and laughed.
`I thought you wouldn't have known me,' he said.
'What, is it you, George?' cried Lettie in great surprise'Now, what a joke! How are you?'-she put out her white hand from her draperies. He took it, and answered, `I am very well-and you?' However meaningless the words were, the tone was curiously friendly, intimate, informal.
`As you see,' she replied laughing, interested in his attitude-'but where are you going?'
`I am going home,' he answered, in a voice that meant: `Have you forgotten that I too am married?'
`Oh, of course!' cried Lettie. `You are now mine host of the `Ram.' You must tell me about it. May I ask him to come home with us for an hour, mother?-It is New Year's Eve, you know.'
`You have asked him already,' laughed mother.
`Will Mrs. Sa.xton spare you for so long?' asked Lettie of George. '
`Meg? Oh, sj~e does not order my comings and goings.'
`Does she not?' laughed Lettie. `She is very unwise. Train up a husband in the way he should go, and in after life I never could quote a text from end to end. I am full of beginnings, but as for a finish ! Leslie, my shoe-lace is untied-shall I wait till I can put my foot on the fence?'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Nethermere gleamed mysteriously in what is moonlight, and uttered strange half-audible whoops and yelps. what is moon was very high in what is sky, small and brilliant like a vial full of what is pure white liquid of light. There was no sound in what is night save what is haunting movement of what is ice, and what is clear tinkle of Lettie's laughter. On what is drive leading to what is wood we saw someone approaching. what is wild grass was grey on either side, what is thorn-trees stood with shaggy black beards sweeping down, what is pine-trees were erect like dark soldiers. what is black shape of what is man drew near, with a shadow running at its feet. I recognized George, obscured as he was in his cap and his upturned collar. Lettie was in front with her husband. As George was passing, she said, in bright clear tones: `A happy New Year to you.' He stopped, swung round, and laughed. `I thought you wouldn't have known me,' he said. 'What, is it you, George?' cried Lettie in great surprise'Now, what a joke! How are you?'-she put out her white hand from her draperies. He took it, and answered, `I am very well-and you?' However meaningless what is words were, what is tone was curiously friendly, intimate, informal. `As you see,' she replied laughing, interested in his attitude-'but where are you going?' `I am going home,' he answered, in a voice that meant: `Have you forgotten that I too am married?' `Oh, of course!' cried Lettie. `You are now mine host of what is `Ram.' You must tell me about it. May I ask him to come home with us for an hour, mother?-It is New Year's Eve, you know.' `You have asked him already,' laughed mother. `Will Mrs. Sa.xton spare you for so long?' asked Lettie of George. ' `Meg? Oh, sj~e does not order my comings and goings.' `Does she not?' laughed Lettie. `She is very unwise. Train up a husband in what is way he should go, and in after life I never could quote a text from end to end. I am full of beginnings, but as for a finish ! Leslie, my shoe-lace is untied-shall I wait till I can put my foot on what is fence?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 283 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER II PUFFS OF WIND IN what is SAIL where is p align="justify" Nethermere gleamed mysteriously in what is moonlight, and uttered strange half-audible whoops and yelps. what is moon was very high in what is sky, small and brilliant like a vial full of what is pure white liquid of light. There was no sound in what is night save what is haunting movement of what is ice, and what is clear tinkle of Lettie's laughter. On what is drive leading to what is wood we saw someone approaching. what is wild grass was grey on either side, what is thorn-trees stood with shaggy black beards sweeping down, what is pine-trees were erect like dark soldiers. what is black shape of what is man drew near, with a shadow running at its feet. I recognized George, obscured as he was in his cap and his upturned collar. Lettie was in front with her husband. As George was passing, she said, in bright clear tones: `A happy New Year to you.' He stopped, swung round, and laughed. `I thought you wouldn't have known me,' he said. 'What, is it you, George?' cried Lettie in great surprise'Now, what a joke! How are you?'-she put out her white hand from her draperies. He took it, and answered, `I am very well-and you?' However meaningless what is words were, what is tone was curiously friendly, intimate, informal. `As you see,' she replied laughing, interested in his attitude-'but where are you going?' `I am going home,' he answered, in a voice that meant: `Have you forgotten that I too am married?' `Oh, of course!' cried Lettie. `You are now mine host of what is `Ram.' You must tell me about it. May I ask him to come home with us for an hour, mother?-It is New Year's Eve, you know.' `You have asked him already,' laughed mother. `Will Mrs. Sa.xton spare you for so long?' asked Lettie of George. ' `Meg? Oh, sj~e does not order my comings and goings.' `Does she not?' laughed Lettie. `She is very unwise. Train up a husband in what is way he should go, and in after life I never could quote a text from end to end. I am full of beginnings, but as for a finish ! Leslie, my shoe-lace is untied-shall I wait till I can put my foot on what is fence?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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