Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 282

PART III - CHAPTER II
PUFFS OF WIND IN THE SAIL

'And you,' replied the old man, `toddling about your back-yard, think yourself mighty wise. But your wisdom 'll go with your teeth. You 'll learn in time to say nothing.'
The old man went out and began his work, carrying the sacks of corn from the machine to the chamber.
`There 's a lot in the old Parrot,' said George, `as he 'll never tell.'
I laughed.
`He makes you feel, as well, as if you 'd a lot to discover in life,' he continued, looking thoughtfully over the dusty straw-stack at the chuffing machine.

After the harvest was ended the father began to deplete his farm. Most of the stock was transferred to the 'Ram.' George was going to take over his father's milk business, and was going to farm enough of the land attaching to the inn to support nine or ten cows. Until the spring, however, Mr. Saxton retained his own milk-round, and worked at improving the condition of the land ready for the valuation. George, with three cows, started a little milk supply in the neighbourhood of the inn, prepared his land for the summer, and helped in the pu~lic-house.
Emily was the first to depart finally from the Mill. She went to a school in Nottingham, and shortly afterwards Mollie, her younger sister, went to her. In October I moved to London. Lettie and Leslie were settled in their home in Brentwood, Yorkshire. We all felt very keenly our exile from Nethermere. But as yet the bonds were not broken; only use could sever them. Christmas brought us all home again, hastening to greet each other. There was a slight change in everybody. Lettie was brighter, more imperious, and very gay; Emily was quiet, self-restrained, and looked happier; Leslie was jollier and at the same time more subdued and earnest; George looked very healthy and happy, and sounded well pleased with himself; my mother with her gaiety at our return brought tears to our eyes.
We dined one evening at Highclose with the Tempests. It was dull as usual, and we left before ten o'clock. Lettie had changed her shoes and put on a fine cloak of greenish blue. We walked over the frost-bound road. The ice on

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'And you,' replied what is old man, `toddling about your back-yard, think yourself mighty wise. But your wisdom 'll go with your teeth. You 'll learn in time to say nothing.' what is old man went out and began his work, carrying what is sacks of corn from what is machine to what is chamber. `There 's a lot in what is old Parrot,' said George, `as he 'll never tell.' I laughed. `He makes you feel, as well, as if you 'd a lot to discover in life,' he continued, looking thoughtfully over what is dusty straw-stack at what is chuffing machine. After what is harvest was ended what is father began to deplete his farm. Most of what is stock was transferred to what is 'Ram.' George was going to take over his father's milk business, and was going to farm enough of what is land attaching to what is inn to support nine or ten cows. Until what is spring, however, Mr. Saxton retained his own milk-round, and worked at improving what is condition of what is land ready for what is valuation. George, with three cows, started a little milk supply in what is neighbourhood of what is inn, prepared his land for what is summer, and helped in what is pu~lic-house. Emily was what is first to depart finally from what is Mill. She went to a school in Nottingham, and shortly afterwards Mollie, her younger sister, went to her. In October I moved to London. Lettie and Leslie were settled in their home in Brentwood, Yorkshire. We all felt very keenly our exile from Nethermere. But as yet what is bonds were not broken; only use could sever them. Christmas brought us all home again, hastening to greet each other. There was a slight change in everybody. Lettie was brighter, more imperious, and very gay; Emily was quiet, self-restrained, and looked happier; Leslie was jollier and at what is same time more subdued and earnest; George looked very healthy and happy, and sounded well pleased with himself; my mother with her gaiety at our return brought tears to our eyes. We dined one evening at Highclose with what is Tempests. It was dull as usual, and we left before ten o'clock. Lettie had changed her shoes and put on a fine cloak of greenish blue. We walked over what is frost-bound road. what is ice on where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 282 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER II PUFFS OF WIND IN what is SAIL where is p align="justify" 'And you,' replied what is old man, `toddling about your back-yard, think yourself mighty wise. But your wisdom 'll go with your teeth. You 'll learn in time to say nothing.' what is old man went out and began his work, carrying what is sacks of corn from what is machine to what is chamber. `There 's a lot in what is old Parrot,' said George, `as he 'll never tell.' I laughed. `He makes you feel, as well, as if you 'd a lot to discover in life,' he continued, looking thoughtfully over what is dusty straw-stack at what is chuffing machine. After what is harvest was ended what is father began to deplete his farm. Most of what is stock was transferred to what is 'Ram.' George was going to take over his father's milk business, and was going to farm enough of what is land attaching to what is inn to support nine or ten cows. Until what is spring, however, Mr. Saxton retained his own milk-round, and worked at improving what is condition of what is land ready for what is valuation. George, with three cows, started a little milk supply in what is neighbourhood of what is inn, prepared his land for what is summer, and helped in what is pu~lic-house. Emily was what is first to depart finally from what is Mill. She went to a school in Nottingham, and shortly afterwards Mollie, her younger sister, went to her. In October I moved to London. Lettie and Leslie were settled in their home in Brentwood, Yorkshire. We all felt very keenly our exile from Nethermere. But as yet what is bonds were not broken; only use could sever them. Christmas brought us all home again, hastening to greet each other. There was a slight change in everybody. Lettie was brighter, more imperious, and very gay; Emily was quiet, self-restrained, and looked happier; Leslie was jollier and at what is same time more subdued and earnest; George looked very healthy and happy, and sounded well pleased with himself; my mother with her gaiety at our return brought tears to our eyes. We dined one evening at Highclose with what is Tempests. It was dull as usual, and we left before ten o'clock. Lettie had changed her shoes and put on a fine cloak of greenish blue. We walked over what is frost-bound road. what is ice on where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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