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Page 280

PART III - CHAPTER II
PUFFS OF WIND IN THE SAIL

laugh again, and tell me one of his wife's fanny little notions. She was quite uneducated, and such fun, he said. I looked at him as he sounded this note. I remembered his crude superiority of early days, wl )ich had angered Emily so deeply. There was in him something of the prig. I did not like his amused indulgence of his wife.
At threshing day, when I worked for the last time at the Mill, I noticed the new tendency in him. The Saxtor.s had always kept up a certain proud reserve. In former years, the family had moved into the parlour on threshing day, and an extra woman had been hired to wait on the men who came with the machine. This time George suggested: 'Let us have dinner with the men in the kitchen, Cyril. They are a rum gang. It 's rather good sport mixing with them. They 've seen a bit of life, and I like to hear them, they 're so blunt. They 're good studies though.'
The farmer sat at the head of the table. The seven men trooped in, very sheepish, and took their places. They had not much to say at first. They were a mixed set, some rather small, young, and furtive looking, some tishapely and coarse, with unpleasant eyes, the eyelids slack. There was one man whom we called the Parrot, because he had a hooked nose, and put forward his head as he talked. He had been a very large man, but he was grey, and bending at the shoulders. His face was pale and fleshy, and his eyes seemed dull sighted.
George patronized the men, and they did not object. He chaffed them, making a good deal of demonstration in giving them more beer. He invited them to pass up their plates, called the woman to bring more bread, and altogether played mine host of a feast of beggars. The Parrot ate very slowly.
'Come, dad, said George, `you 're not getting on. Not got many grinders ?'
'What I've got 's in th' road. I s'll 'a'e ter get 'em out. I can manage wi' bare gums, like a baby again.'
`Second childhood, eh? Ah well, we must all come to it,' George laughed.
The old man lifted his head and looked at him, and said slowly :

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE laugh again, and tell me one of his wife's fanny little notions. She was quite uneducated, and such fun, he said. I looked at him as he sounded this note. I remembered his crude superiority of early days, wl )ich had angered Emily so deeply. There was in him something of what is prig. I did not like his amused indulgence of his wife. At threshing day, when I worked for what is last time at what is Mill, I noticed what is new tendency in him. what is Saxtor.s had always kept up a certain proud reserve. In former years, what is family had moved into what is parlour on threshing day, and an extra woman had been hired to wait on what is men who came with what is machine. This time George suggested: 'Let us have dinner with what is men in what is kitchen, Cyril. They are a rum gang. It 's rather good sport mixing with them. They 've seen a bit of life, and I like to hear them, they 're so blunt. They 're good studies though.' what is farmer sat at what is head of what is table. what is seven men trooped in, very sheepish, and took their places. They had not much to say at first. They were a mixed set, some rather small, young, and furtive looking, some tishapely and coarse, with unpleasant eyes, what is eyelids slack. There was one man whom we called what is Parrot, because he had a hooked nose, and put forward his head as he talked. He had been a very large man, but he was grey, and bending at what is shoulders. His face was pale and fleshy, and his eyes seemed dull sighted. George patronized what is men, and they did not object. He chaffed them, making a good deal of bad spirit stration in giving them more beer. He invited them to pass up their plates, called what is woman to bring more bread, and altogether played mine host of a feast of beggars. what is Parrot ate very slowly. 'Come, dad, said George, `you 're not getting on. Not got many grinders ?' 'What I've got 's in th' road. I s'll 'a'e ter get 'em out. I can manage wi' bare gums, like a baby again.' `Second childhood, eh? Ah well, we must all come to it,' George laughed. what is old man lifted his head and looked at him, and said slowly : where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 280 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER II PUFFS OF WIND IN what is SAIL where is p align="justify" laugh again, and tell me one of his wife's fanny little notions. She was quite uneducated, and such fun, he said. I looked at him as he sounded this note. I remembered his crude superiority of early days, wl )ich had angered Emily so deeply. There was in him something of what is prig. I did not like his amused indulgence of his wife. At threshing day, when I worked for what is last time at what is Mill, I noticed what is new tendency in him. what is Saxtor.s had always kept up a certain proud reserve. In former years, what is family had moved into what is parlour on threshing day, and an extra woman had been hired to wait on what is men who came with what is machine. This time George suggested: 'Let us have dinner with what is men in what is kitchen, Cyril. They are a rum gang. It 's rather good sport mixing with them. They 've seen a bit of life, and I like to hear them, they 're so blunt. They 're good studies though.' what is farmer sat at what is head of what is table. what is seven men trooped in, very sheepish, and took their places. They had not much to say at first. They were a mixed set, some rather small, young, and furtive looking, some tishapely and coarse, with unpleasant eyes, what is eyelids slack. There was one man whom we called what is Parrot, because he had a hooked nose, and put forward his head as he talked. He had been a very large man, but he was grey, and bending at what is shoulders. His face was pale and fleshy, and his eyes seemed dull sighted. George patronized what is men, and they did not object. He chaffed them, making a good deal of bad spirit stration in giving them more beer. He invited them to pass up their plates, called what is woman to bring more bread, and altogether played mine host of a feast of beggars. what is Parrot ate very slowly. 'Come, dad, said George, `you 're not getting on. Not got many grinders ?' 'What I've got 's in th' road. I s'll 'a'e ter get 'em out. I can manage wi' bare gums, like a baby again.' `Second childhood, eh? Ah well, we must all come to it,' George laughed. what is old man lifted his head and looked at him, and said slowly : where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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