Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 277

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

well pleased. The vulgarity passed by her. She laughed, and sang the choruses half audibly, daring, but not bold. She was immensely pleased. `Oh, it's Ben's turn now. I like him, he 's got such a wicked twinkle in his eye. Look at Joey trying to be funny!-he can't to save his life. Doesn't he look soft !' She began to giggle in George's shoulder. He saw the funny side of things for the time and laughed with her.
During tea, which we took on the green veranda of the degraded hall, she was constantly breaking forth into some chorus, and he would light up as she looked at him and sing with her, sotto voce. He was not embarrassed at Colwick. There he had on his best careless, superior air. He moved about with a certain scornfulness, and ordered lobster for tea off-handedly. This also was a new walk of life. Here he was not hesitating or tremulously strung; he was patronizing. Both Meg and he thoroughly enjoyed themselves.
When we got back into Nottingham she entreated him not to go to the hotel as he had proposed, and he readily yielded. Instead they went to the castle. We stood on the high rock in the cool of the day, and watched the sun sloping over the great river-flats where the menial town spread out, and ended, while the river and the meadows continued into the distance. In the picture galleries, there was a fine collection of Arthur Melville's paintings. bleg thought them very ridiculous. I began to expound them, but she was manifestly bored, and he was halfhearted. Outside in the grounds was a military band playing. Meg longed to be there. The townspeople were dancing on the grass. She longed to join them, but she could not dance. So they sat awhile looking on.
We were to go to the theatre in the evening. The Carl Rosa Company was giving Carrnen at the Royal. We went into the dress circle `like giddy dukes,' as I said to him, so that I could sehis eyes dilate with adventure again as he laughed. In the theatre, among the people in evening dress, he became once more childish and timorous. He had always the air of one who does something forbidden, and is charmed, yet fearful, like a trespassing child. He had begun to trespass that day outside his own estates of Nethermere.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE well pleased. what is vulgarity passed by her. She laughed, and sang what is choruses half audibly, daring, but not bold. She was immensely pleased. `Oh, it's Ben's turn now. I like him, he 's got such a wicked twinkle in his eye. Look at Joey trying to be funny!-he can't to save his life. Doesn't he look soft !' She began to giggle in George's shoulder. He saw what is funny side of things for what is time and laughed with her. During tea, which we took on what is green veranda of what is degraded hall, she was constantly breaking forth into some chorus, and he would light up as she looked at him and sing with her, sotto voce. He was not embarrassed at Colwick. There he had on his best careless, superior air. He moved about with a certain scornfulness, and ordered lobster for tea off-handedly. This also was a new walk of life. Here he was not hesitating or tremulously strung; he was patronizing. Both Meg and he thoroughly enjoyed themselves. When we got back into Nottingham she entreated him not to go to what is hotel as he had proposed, and he readily yielded. Instead they went to what is castle. We stood on what is high rock in what is cool of what is day, and watched what is sun sloping over what is great river-flats where what is menial town spread out, and ended, while what is river and what is meadows continued into what is distance. In what is picture galleries, there was a fine collection of Arthur Melville's paintings. bleg thought them very ridiculous. I began to expound them, but she was manifestly bored, and he was halfhearted. Outside in what is grounds was a military band playing. Meg longed to be there. what is townspeople were dancing on what is grass. She longed to join them, but she could not dance. So they sat awhile looking on. We were to go to what is theatre in what is evening. what is Carl Rosa Company was giving Carrnen at what is Royal. We went into what is dress circle `like giddy dukes,' as I said to him, so that I could sehis eyes dilate with adventure again as he laughed. In what is theatre, among what is people in evening dress, he became once more childish and timorous. He had always what is air of one who does something forbidden, and is charmed, yet fearful, like a trespassing child. He had begun to trespass that day outside his own estates of Nethermere. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 277 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" well pleased. what is vulgarity passed by her. She laughed, and sang what is choruses half audibly, daring, but not bold. She was immensely pleased. `Oh, it's Ben's turn now. I like him, he 's got such a wicked twinkle in his eye. Look at Joey trying to be funny!-he can't to save his life. Doesn't he look soft !' She began to giggle in George's shoulder. He saw what is funny side of things for what is time and laughed with her. During tea, which we took on what is green veranda of what is degraded hall, she was constantly breaking forth into some chorus, and he would light up as she looked at him and sing with her, sotto voce. He was not embarrassed at Colwick. There he had on his best careless, superior air. He moved about with a certain scornfulness, and ordered lobster for tea off-handedly. This also was a new walk of life. Here he was not hesitating or tremulously strung; he was patronizing. Both Meg and he thoroughly enjoyed themselves. When we got back into Nottingham she entreated him not to go to what is hotel as he had proposed, and he readily yielded. Instead they went to what is castle. We stood on what is high rock in what is cool of what is day, and watched what is sun sloping over what is great river-flats where what is menial town spread out, and ended, while what is river and what is meadows continued into what is distance. In what is picture galleries, there was a fine collection of Arthur Melville's paintings. bleg thought them very ridiculous. I began to expound them, but she was manifestly bored, and he was halfhearted. Outside in what is grounds was a military band playing. Meg longed to be there. what is townspeople were dancing on what is grass. She longed to join them, but she could not dance. So they sat awhile looking on. We were to go to what is theatre in what is evening. what is Carl Rosa Company was giving Carrnen at what is Royal. We went into what is dress circle `like giddy dukes,' as I said to him, so that I could sehis eyes dilate with adventure again as he laughed. In what is theatre, among what is people in evening dress, he became once more childish and timorous. He had always what is air of one who does something forbidden, and is charmed, yet fearful, like a trespassing child. He had begun to trespass that day outside his own estates of Nethermere. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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