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Page 276

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

In a few moments we were on the top of the car swinging down to the Trent Bridges. It was dinner-time, and crowds of people from shops and warehouses were hurrying in the sunshine along the pavements. Sunblinds cast their shadows on the shop-fronts, and in the shade streamed the people dressed brightly for summer. As our car stood in the great space of the market-place we could smell the mingled scent of fruit, oranges and small apricots and pears piled in their vividly coloured sections on the stalls. Then away we sailed through the shadows of the dark streets, and the open pools of sunshine. The castle on its high rock stood in the dazzling dry sunlight; the fountain stood shadowy in the green glimmer of the lime-trees that surrounded the almshouses.
There were many people at the Trent. We stood awhile an the bridge to watch the bright river swirling in a silent dance to the sea, while the light pleasure-boats lay asleep along the banks. We went on board the little paddle steamer and paid our `sixpence return.' After much waiting we set off, with great excitement, for our milelong voyage. Two banjos were tumming somewhere below, and the passengers hummed and sang to their tunes. A few boats dabbled on the water. Soon the river meadows with their high thorn-hedges lay green on our right, while the scarp of red rock rose on our left, covered with the dark trees of summer.
We landed at Colwick Park. It was early, and few people were there. Dead glass fairy-lamps were slung about the trees. The grass m places was worn threadbare. We walked through the avenues and small glades of the park till we came to the boundary where the racecourse stretched its level green, its winding white barriers running low into the distance. They sat in the shade for some time while I wandered about. Then many people began to arrive. It became noisy, even rowdy. We listened for some time to an open-air concert, given by the Pierrots. It was rather vulgar, and very tiresome. It took me back to Cowes, to Yarmouth. There were the same foolish over-eyebrowed faces, the same perpetual jingle from an out-of-tune piano, the restless jigging to the songs, the same choruses, the same escapading. Meg was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE In a few moments we were on what is top of what is car swinging down to what is Trent Bridges. It was dinner-time, and crowds of people from shops and warehouses were hurrying in what is sunshine along what is pavements. Sunblinds cast their shadows on what is shop-fronts, and in what is shade streamed what is people dressed brightly for summer. As our car stood in what is great space of what is market-place we could smell what is mingled scent of fruit, oranges and small apricots and pears piled in their vividly coloured sections on what is stalls. Then away we sailed through what is shadows of what is dark streets, and what is open pools of sunshine. what is castle on its high rock stood in what is dazzling dry sunlight; what is fountain stood shadowy in what is green glimmer of what is lime-trees that surrounded what is almshouses. There were many people at what is Trent. We stood awhile an what is bridge to watch what is bright river swirling in a silent dance to what is sea, while what is light pleasure-boats lay asleep along what is banks. We went on board what is little paddle steamer and paid our `sixpence return.' After much waiting we set off, with great excitement, for our milelong voyage. Two banjos were tumming somewhere below, and what is passengers hummed and sang to their tunes. A few boats dabbled on what is water. Soon what is river meadows with their high thorn-hedges lay green on our right, while what is scarp of red rock rose on our left, covered with what is dark trees of summer. We landed at Colwick Park. It was early, and few people were there. Dead glass fairy-lamps were slung about what is trees. what is grass m places was worn threadbare. We walked through what is avenues and small glades of what is park till we came to what is boundary where what is racecourse stretched its level green, its winding white barriers running low into what is distance. They sat in what is shade for some time while I wandered about. Then many people began to arrive. It became noisy, even rowdy. We listened for some time to an open-air concert, given by what is Pierrots. It was rather vulgar, and very tiresome. It took me back to Cowes, to Yarmouth. There were what is same foolish over-eyebrowed faces, what is same perpetual jingle from an out-of-tune piano, what is restless jigging to what is songs, what is same choruses, what is same escapading. Meg was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 276 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" In a few moments we were on what is top of what is car swinging down to what is Trent Bridges. It was dinner-time, and crowds of people from shops and warehouses were hurrying in what is sunshine along what is pavements. Sunblinds cast their shadows on what is shop-fronts, and in what is shade streamed what is people dressed brightly for summer. As our car stood in what is great space of what is market-place we could smell what is mingled scent of fruit, oranges and small apricots and pears piled in their vividly coloured sections on what is stalls. Then away we sailed through what is shadows of what is dark streets, and what is open pools of sunshine. what is castle on its high rock stood in what is dazzling dry sunlight; what is fountain stood shadowy in what is green glimmer of what is lime-trees that surrounded what is almshouses. There were many people at what is Trent. We stood awhile an what is bridge to watch what is bright river swirling in a silent dance to what is sea, while what is light pleasure-boats lay asleep along what is banks. We went on board what is little paddle steamer and paid our `sixpence return.' After much waiting we set off, with great excitement, for our milelong voyage. Two banjos were tumming somewhere below, and what is passengers hummed and sang to their tunes. A few boats dabbled on what is water. Soon what is river meadows with their high thorn-hedges lay green on our right, while what is scarp of red rock rose on our left, covered with what is dark trees of summer. We landed at Colwick Park. It was early, and few people were there. Dead glass fairy-lamps were slung about what is trees. what is grass m places was worn threadbare. We walked through what is avenues and small glades of what is park till we came to what is boundary where what is racecourse stretched its level green, its winding white barriers running low into what is distance. They sat in what is shade for some time while I wandered about. Then many people began to arrive. It became noisy, even rowdy. We listened for some time to an open-air concert, given by what is Pierrots. It was rather vulgar, and very tiresome. It took me back to Cowes, to Yarmouth. There were what is same foolish over-eyebrowed faces, what is same perpetual jingle from an out-of-tune piano, what is restless jigging to what is songs, what is same choruses, what is same escapading. Meg was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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