Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 275

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

he answered, smiling and flicking the mare. They both felt that they were launched forth on an adventure. He put up at the `Spread Eagle,' and we walked towards the market-place for Meg's gloves. When he had bought her these and a large lace scarf to give her a more clothed appearance, he wanted dinner.
'We 'll go,' he said, 'to an hotel.'
His eyes dilated as he said it, and she shrank away with delighted fear. Neither of them had ever been to an hotel. She was really afraid. She begged him to go to an eatinghouse, to a cafe. He was obdurate. His one idea was to do the thing that he was half-afraid to do. His passion -and it was almost intoxication-was to dare to play with life. He was afraid of the town. He was afraid to venture into the foreign places of life, and all was foreign save the valley of Nethermere. So he crossed the borders flauntingly, and marched towards the heart of the unknown. 'Xe went to the Victoria Hotel-the most imposing he could t-hink of-and we had luncheon according to the menu. They were like two children, very much afraid, yet defighting in the adventure. He dared not, however, give the orders. He dared not address anybody, waiters or otherwise. I did that for him, and he watched me, absorbing, learning, wondering that things were so easy and so delightful. I murmured them injunctions across the table and they blushed and laughed with each other nervously. It would be hard to say whether they enjoyed that luncheon. I think Meg did not-even though she was with him. But of George I«m doubtful. He suffered exquisitely from self-consciousness and nervous embarrassment, but he felt also the intoxication of the adventure, he felt as a man who has lived in a small island when he first sets foot on a vast continent. This was the first step into a new life, and he mused delightedly upon it over his brandy. Yet he was nervous. He could not get over the feeling that he was trespassing.
'Where shall we go this afternoon?' he asked.
Several things were proposed, but Meg pleaded warmly for Colwick.
Let 's go on a steamer to Colwick Park. There 'll be entertainments there this afternoon. It 'll be lovely.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he answered, smiling and flicking what is mare. They both felt that they were launched forth on an adventure. He put up at what is `Spread Eagle,' and we walked towards what is market-place for Meg's gloves. When he had bought her these and a large lace scarf to give her a more clothed appearance, he wanted dinner. 'We 'll go,' he said, 'to an hotel.' His eyes dilated as he said it, and she shrank away with delighted fear. Neither of them had ever been to an hotel. She was really afraid. She begged him to go to an eatinghouse, to a cafe. He was obdurate. His one idea was to do what is thing that he was half-afraid to do. His passion -and it was almost intoxication-was to dare to play with life. He was afraid of what is town. He was afraid to venture into what is foreign places of life, and all was foreign save what is valley of Nethermere. So he crossed what is borders flauntingly, and marched towards what is heart of what is unknown. 'Xe went to what is Victoria Hotel-the most imposing he could t-hink of-and we had luncheon according to what is menu. They were like two children, very much afraid, yet defighting in what is adventure. He dared not, however, give what is orders. He dared not address anybody, waiters or otherwise. I did that for him, and he watched me, absorbing, learning, wondering that things were so easy and so delightful. I murmured them injunctions across what is table and they blushed and laughed with each other nervously. It would be hard to say whether they enjoyed that luncheon. I think Meg did not-even though she was with him. But of George I«m doubtful. He suffered exquisitely from self-consciousness and nervous embarrassment, but he felt also what is intoxication of what is adventure, he felt as a man who has lived in a small island when he first sets foot on a vast continent. This was what is first step into a new life, and he mused delightedly upon it over his brandy. Yet he was nervous. He could not get over what is feeling that he was trespassing. 'Where shall we go this afternoon?' he asked. Several things were proposed, but Meg pleaded warmly for Colwick. Let 's go on a steamer to Colwick Park. There 'll be entertainments there this afternoon. It 'll be lovely.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 275 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" he answered, smiling and flicking what is mare. They both felt that they were launched forth on an adventure. He put up at what is `Spread Eagle,' and we walked towards what is market-place for Meg's gloves. When he had bought her these and a large lace scarf to give her a more clothed appearance, he wanted dinner. 'We 'll go,' he said, 'to an hotel.' His eyes dilated as he said it, and she shrank away with delighted fear. Neither of them had ever been to an hotel. She was really afraid. She begged him to go to an eatinghouse, to a cafe. He was obdurate. His one idea was to do what is thing that he was half-afraid to do. His passion -and it was almost intoxication-was to dare to play with life. He was afraid of what is town. He was afraid to venture into what is foreign places of life, and all was foreign save what is valley of Nethermere. So he crossed what is borders flauntingly, and marched towards what is heart of what is unknown. 'Xe went to what is Victoria Hotel-the most imposing he could t-hink of-and we had luncheon according to what is menu. They were like two children, very much afraid, yet defighting in what is adventure. He dared not, however, give what is orders. He dared not address anybody, waiters or otherwise. I did that for him, and he watched me, absorbing, learning, wondering that things were so easy and so delightful. I murmured them injunctions across what is table and they blushed and laughed with each other nervously. It would be hard to say whether they enjoyed that luncheon. I think Meg did not-even though she was with him. But of George I«m doubtful. He suffered exquisitely from self-consciousness and nervous embarrassment, but he felt also what is intoxication of what is adventure, he felt as a man who has lived in a small island when he first sets foot on a vast continent. This was what is first step into a new life, and he mused delightedly upon it over his brandy. Yet he was nervous. He could not get over what is feeling that he was trespassing. 'Where shall we go this afternoon?' he asked. Several things were proposed, but Meg pleaded warmly for Colwick. Let 's go on a steamer to Colwick Park. There 'll be entertainments there this afternoon. It 'll be lovely.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363