Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 272

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

hat was disarranged once more by the sweeping elmboughs. The yellow corn was dipping and flowing in the fields, like a cloth of gold pegged down at the corners under which the wind was heaving. Sometimes we passed cottages where the scarlet lilies rose like bonfires, and the tall larkspur like bright blue leaping smoke. Sometimes we smelled the sunshine on the browning corn, sometimes the fragrance of the shadow of leaves. Occasionally it -was the dizzy scent of new haystacks. Then we rocked and jolted over the rough cobble-stones of Cinderhill, and bounded forward again at the foot of the enormous pit hill, smelling of sulphur, inflamed with slow red fires m the daylight, and crusted with ashes. We reached the top of the rise and saw the city before us, heaped high and dim upon the broad range of the hill. I looked for the square tower of my old school, and the sharp proud spire of St. Andrew's. Over the city hung a dullness, a thin dirty canopy against the blue sky.
We turned and swung down the slope between the last sullied cornfields towards Basford, where the swollen gasometers stood like toadstools. As we neared the mouth of the street, Meg rose excitedly, pulling George's arm, crying :
Oh, look, the poor little thing!'
On the causeway stood two small boys lifting their faces and weeping to the heedless heavens, while before them, upside down, lay a baby strapped to a shut-up baby-chair. The gimcrack carpet-seated thing had collapsed as the boys were dismounting the curbstone with it. It had fallen backwards, and they were unable to right it. There lay the infant strapped head downwards to its silly cart, in imminent danger of suffocation. hieg leaped out, and dragged the child from the wretched chair. The two boys, drenched with tears, howled on. Meg crouched on the road, the baby on her knee, its tiny feet dangling against her skirt. She soothed the pitiful tear-wet mite. She hugged it to her, and kissed it, and hugged it, and rocked it in an abandonment of pity. When at last the childish trio were silent, the boys shaken only by the last ebbing sobs, Meg calmed also from her frenzy of pity for the little thing. She murmured to it tenderly, and wiped its wet ~,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE hat was disarranged once more by what is sweeping elmboughs. what is yellow corn was dipping and flowing in what is fields, like a cloth of gold pegged down at what is corners under which what is wind was heaving. Sometimes we passed cottages where what is scarlet lilies rose like bonfires, and what is tall larkspur like bright blue leaping smoke. Sometimes we smelled what is sunshine on what is browning corn, sometimes what is fragrance of what is shadow of leaves. Occasionally it -was what is dizzy scent of new haystacks. Then we rocked and jolted over what is rough cobble-stones of Cinderhill, and bounded forward again at what is foot of what is enormous pit hill, smelling of sulphur, inflamed with slow red fires m what is daylight, and crusted with ashes. We reached what is top of what is rise and saw what is city before us, heaped high and dim upon what is broad range of what is hill. I looked for what is square tower of my old school, and what is sharp proud spire of St. Andrew's. Over what is city hung a dullness, a thin dirty canopy against what is blue sky. We turned and swung down what is slope between what is last sullied cornfields towards Basford, where what is swollen gasometers stood like toadstools. As we neared what is mouth of what is street, Meg rose excitedly, pulling George's arm, crying : Oh, look, what is poor little thing!' On what is causeway stood two small boys lifting their faces and weeping to what is heedless heavens, while before them, upside down, lay a baby strapped to a shut-up baby-chair. what is gimcrack carpet-seated thing had collapsed as what is boys were dismounting what is curbstone with it. It had fallen backwards, and they were unable to right it. There lay what is infant strapped head downwards to its silly cart, in imminent danger of suffocation. hieg leaped out, and dragged what is child from what is wretched chair. what is two boys, drenched with tears, howled on. Meg crouched on what is road, what is baby on her knee, its tiny feet dangling against her skirt. She soothed what is pitiful tear-wet mite. She hugged it to her, and kissed it, and hugged it, and rocked it in an abandonment of pity. When at last what is childish trio were silent, what is boys shaken only by what is last ebbing sobs, Meg calmed also from her frenzy of pity for what is little thing. She murmured to it tenderly, and wiped its wet ~, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 272 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" hat was disarranged once more by what is sweeping elmboughs. what is yellow corn was dipping and flowing in what is fields, like a cloth of gold pegged down at what is corners under which what is wind was heaving. Sometimes we passed cottages where what is scarlet lilies rose like bonfires, and what is tall larkspur like bright blue leaping smoke. Sometimes we smelled what is sunshine on what is browning corn, sometimes what is fragrance of what is shadow of leaves. Occasionally it -was what is dizzy scent of new haystacks. Then we rocked and jolted over what is rough cobble-stones of Cinderhill, and bounded forward again at what is foot of what is enormous pit hill, smelling of sulphur, inflamed with slow red fires m what is daylight, and crusted with ashes. We reached what is top of what is rise and saw what is city before us, heaped high and dim upon what is broad range of what is hill. I looked for what is square tower of my old school, and what is sharp proud spire of St. Andrew's. Over what is city hung a dullness, a thin dirty canopy against what is blue sky. We turned and swung down what is slope between what is last sullied cornfields towards Basford, where what is swollen gasometers stood like toadstools. As we neared what is mouth of what is street, Meg rose excitedly, pulling George's arm, crying : Oh, look, what is poor little thing!' On what is causeway stood two small boys lifting their faces and weeping to what is heedless heavens, while before them, upside down, lay a baby strapped to a shut-up baby-chair. what is gimcrack carpet-seated thing had collapsed as what is boys were dismounting what is curbstone with it. It had fallen backwards, and they were unable to right it. There lay what is infant strapped head downwards to its silly cart, in imminent danger of suffocation. hieg leaped out, and dragged what is child from what is wretched chair. what is two boys, drenched with tears, howled on. Meg crouched on what is road, what is baby on her knee, its tiny feet dangling against her skirt. She soothed what is pitiful tear-wet mite. She hugged it to her, and kissed it, and hugged it, and rocked it in an abandonment of pity. When at last what is childish trio were silent, what is boys shaken only by what is last ebbing sobs, Meg calmed also from her frenzy of pity for what is little thing. She murmured to it tenderly, and wiped its wet ~, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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