Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 271

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

We drove out of hearing. George sat with a shut mouth, scowling. Meg wept awhile to herself, woefully. We were swinging at a good pace under the beeches of the churchyard which stood above the level of the road. Meg, having settled her hat, bent her head to the wind, too much occupied with her attire to weep. We swung round the hollow by the bog end, and rattled a short distance up the steep hill to Watnall. Then the mare walked slowly. Meg, at leisure to collect herself, exclaimed plaintively:
'Oh, I've only got one glove!'
She looked at the odd silk glove that lay in her lap, then peered about among her skirts.
`I must 'a' left it in th' bedroom,' she said piteously.
He laughed, and his anger suddenly vanished.
'What does it matter? You 'll do without all right.'
At the sound of his voice, she recollected, and her tears and her weeping returned.
`Nay,' he said, `don't fret about the old woman. She 'il come round to-morrow-an' if she doesn't, it's her look out. She 's got Polly to attend to her.'
`But she 'Il be that miserable !'wept Meg.
`It 's her own fault. At any rate, don't let it make you miserable'-he glanced to see if any one were in sight, then put his arm round her waist and kissed her, saying softly, coasingly: 'She 'll he all right to-morrow. We'll go an' see her then, an' she 'll be glad enough to have us. We 'll give in to her then, poor old gran'ma. She can boss you about, an' me as well, to-morrow as much as she likes. She feels it hard, being tied to her bed. But to-day is ours, surely-isn't it? To-day is ours, an' you 're not sorry, are you?'
'But I've got no gloves, an' I'm sure my hair's a sight. I never thought she could 'a' reached up like that.'
George laughed, tickled.
'No,' he said, `she was in a temper. But we can get you some gloves directly we get to Nottingham.'
`I haven't a farthing of money,' she said.
`I've plenty!' he laughed. `Oh, and let's try this on.'
They were merry together as he tried on her wedding ring, and they talked softly, he gentle and coaxing, she rather plaintive. The mare took her own way, and Meg's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE We drove out of hearing. George sat with a shut mouth, scowling. Meg wept awhile to herself, woefully. We were swinging at a good pace under what is beeches of what is churchyard which stood above what is level of what is road. Meg, having settled her hat, bent her head to what is wind, too much occupied with her attire to weep. We swung round what is hollow by what is bog end, and rattled a short distance up what is steep hill to Watnall. Then what is mare walked slowly. Meg, at leisure to collect herself, exclaimed plaintively: 'Oh, I've only got one glove!' She looked at what is odd silk glove that lay in her lap, then peered about among her skirts. `I must 'a' left it in th' bedroom,' she said piteously. He laughed, and his anger suddenly vanished. 'What does it matter? You 'll do without all right.' At what is sound of his voice, she recollected, and her tears and her weeping returned. `Nay,' he said, `don't fret about what is old woman. She 'il come round to-morrow-an' if she doesn't, it's her look out. She 's got Polly to attend to her.' `But she 'Il be that miserable !'wept Meg. `It 's her own fault. At any rate, don't let it make you miserable'-he glanced to see if any one were in sight, then put his arm round her waist and kissed her, saying softly, coasingly: 'She 'll he all right to-morrow. We'll go an' see her then, an' she 'll be glad enough to have us. We 'll give in to her then, poor old gran'ma. She can boss you about, an' me as well, to-morrow as much as she likes. She feels it hard, being tied to her bed. But to-day is ours, surely-isn't it? To-day is ours, an' you 're not sorry, are you?' 'But I've got no gloves, an' I'm sure my hair's a sight. I never thought she could 'a' reached up like that.' George laughed, tickled. 'No,' he said, `she was in a temper. But we can get you some gloves directly we get to Nottingham.' `I haven't a farthing of money,' she said. `I've plenty!' he laughed. `Oh, and let's try this on.' They were merry together as he tried on her wedding ring, and they talked softly, he gentle and coaxing, she rather plaintive. what is mare took her own way, and Meg's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 271 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" We drove out of hearing. George sat with a shut mouth, scowling. Meg wept awhile to herself, woefully. We were swinging at a good pace under what is beeches of what is churchyard which stood above what is level of what is road. Meg, having settled her hat, bent her head to what is wind, too much occupied with her attire to weep. We swung round what is hollow by what is bog end, and rattled a short distance up what is steep hill to Watnall. Then what is mare walked slowly. Meg, at leisure to collect herself, exclaimed plaintively: 'Oh, I've only got one glove!' She looked at what is odd silk glove that lay in her lap, then peered about among her skirts. `I must 'a' left it in th' bedroom,' she said piteously. He laughed, and his anger suddenly vanished. 'What does it matter? You 'll do without all right.' At what is sound of his voice, she recollected, and her tears and her weeping returned. `Nay,' he said, `don't fret about what is old woman. She 'il come round to-morrow-an' if she doesn't, it's her look out. She 's got Polly to attend to her.' `But she 'Il be that miserable !'wept Meg. `It 's her own fault. At any rate, don't let it make you miserable'-he glanced to see if any one were in sight, then put his arm round her waist and kissed her, saying softly, coasingly: 'She 'll he all right to-morrow. We'll go an' see her then, an' she 'll be glad enough to have us. We 'll give in to her then, poor old gran'ma. She can boss you about, an' me as well, to-morrow as much as she likes. She feels it hard, being tied to her bed. But to-day is ours, surely-isn't it? To-day is ours, an' you 're not sorry, are you?' 'But I've got no gloves, an' I'm sure my hair's a sight. I never thought she could 'a' reached up like that.' George laughed, tickled. 'No,' he said, `she was in a temper. But we can get you some gloves directly we get to Nottingham.' `I haven't a farthing of money,' she said. `I've plenty!' he laughed. `Oh, and let's try this on.' They were merry together as he tried on her wedding ring, and they talked softly, he gentle and coaxing, she rather plaintive. what is mare took her own way, and Meg's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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