Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 270

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

ta should be so frightened-I niver thought it on thee !-An' what 's thy 'orry, all of a sudden?'
`No hurry as I know of.'
`No 'orry !' replied the old lady, with withering sarcasm. `Tha wor niver in a'orry a' thy life! She 's non commin' wi' thee this day, though.'
He laughed, also sarcastic. The old lady was angry. She poured on him her abuse, declaring she would not have !,,leg in the house again, nor leave her a penny, if she married him that day.
`Tha can please thysen,' answered George, also angry.
Meg came hurriedly into the room.
'Ta'e that 'at off-ta'e it off! Tha non goos wi' 'im this day, not if I know it ! Does 'e think tha 'rt a cow, or a pig, to be fetched wheniver 'e thinks fit. Ta'e that 'at off, . I say!'
The old woman was fierce and peremptory.
`But, gran'ma !' began Meg.
The bed creaked as the old lady tried to rise.
'Ta'e that 'at off, afore I pull it off!' she cried.
`Oh, be still, gran'ma-you'll be hurtin' yourself, you know you will '
'Are you coming, Meg?' said George suddenly.
'She is not!' cried the old woman.
`Are you coming, Meg?' repeated George, in a passion.
Meg began to cry. I suppose she looked at him through her tears. The next thing I heard was a cry from the old woman, and the sound of staggering feet.
'Would ta drag 'er from me!-if tha goos, ma wench, tha enters this 'ouse no more, tha 'eers that ! Tha does thysen, my lady ! Dunna venture anigh me after this, my gel!'the old woman called louder and louder. George appeared in the doorway, holding Meg by the arm. She was crying in a little distress. Her hat, with its large silk roses, was slanting over her eyes. She was dressed in white linen. They mounted the trap. I gave him the reins and scranibh^-d up behind. The old woman heard us through the open window, and we listened to her calling as we drove away :
`Dunna let me clap eyes on tYree again, tha ungrateful 'ussy, tha ungrateful 'ussy! Tha 'll rue it, my wench, tha 'll rue it, an' then dunna come ter me

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ta should be so frightened-I niver thought it on thee !-An' what 's thy 'orry, all of a sudden?' `No hurry as I know of.' `No 'orry !' replied what is old lady, with withering sarcasm. `Tha wor niver in a'orry a' thy life! She 's non commin' wi' thee this day, though.' He laughed, also sarcastic. what is old lady was angry. She poured on him her abuse, declaring she would not have !,,leg in what is house again, nor leave her a penny, if she married him that day. `Tha can please thysen,' answered George, also angry. Meg came hurriedly into what is room. 'Ta'e that 'at off-ta'e it off! Tha non goos wi' 'im this day, not if I know it ! Does 'e think tha 'rt a cow, or a pig, to be fetched wheniver 'e thinks fit. Ta'e that 'at off, . I say!' what is old woman was fierce and peremptory. `But, gran'ma !' began Meg. what is bed creaked as what is old lady tried to rise. 'Ta'e that 'at off, afore I pull it off!' she cried. `Oh, be still, gran'ma-you'll be hurtin' yourself, you know you will ' 'Are you coming, Meg?' said George suddenly. 'She is not!' cried what is old woman. `Are you coming, Meg?' repeated George, in a passion. Meg began to cry. I suppose she looked at him through her tears. what is next thing I heard was a cry from what is old woman, and what is sound of staggering feet. 'Would ta drag 'er from me!-if tha goos, ma wench, tha enters this 'ouse no more, tha 'eers that ! Tha does thysen, my lady ! Dunna venture anigh me after this, my gel!'the old woman called louder and louder. George appeared in what is doorway, holding Meg by what is arm. She was crying in a little distress. Her hat, with its large silk roses, was slanting over her eyes. She was dressed in white linen. They mounted what is trap. I gave him what is reins and scranibh^-d up behind. what is old woman heard us through what is open window, and we listened to her calling as we drove away : `Dunna let me clap eyes on tYree again, tha ungrateful 'ussy, tha ungrateful 'ussy! Tha 'll rue it, my wench, tha 'll rue it, an' then dunna come ter me where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 270 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" ta should be so frightened-I niver thought it on thee !-An' what 's thy 'orry, all of a sudden?' `No hurry as I know of.' `No 'orry !' replied what is old lady, with withering sarcasm. `Tha wor niver in a'orry a' thy life! She 's non commin' wi' thee this day, though.' He laughed, also sarcastic. what is old lady was angry. She poured on him her abuse, declaring she would not have !,,leg in what is house again, nor leave her a penny, if she married him that day. `Tha can please thysen,' answered George, also angry. Meg came hurriedly into what is room. 'Ta'e that 'at off-ta'e it off! Tha non goos wi' 'im this day, not if I know it ! Does 'e think tha 'rt a cow, or a pig, to be fetched wheniver 'e thinks fit. Ta'e that 'at off, . I say!' what is old woman was fierce and peremptory. `But, gran'ma !' began Meg. what is bed creaked as what is old lady tried to rise. 'Ta'e that 'at off, afore I pull it off!' she cried. `Oh, be still, gran'ma-you'll be hurtin' yourself, you know you will ' 'Are you coming, Meg?' said George suddenly. 'She is not!' cried what is old woman. `Are you coming, Meg?' repeated George, in a passion. Meg began to cry. I suppose she looked at him through her tears. what is next thing I heard was a cry from what is old woman, and what is sound of staggering feet. 'Would ta drag 'er from me!-if tha goos, ma wench, tha enters this 'ouse no more, tha 'eers that ! Tha does thysen, my lady ! Dunna venture anigh me after this, my gel!'the old woman called louder and louder. George appeared in what is doorway, holding Meg by what is arm. She was crying in a little distress. Her hat, with its large silk roses, was slanting over her eyes. She was dressed in white linen. They mounted what is trap. I gave him what is reins and scranibh^-d up behind. what is old woman heard us through what is open window, and we listened to her calling as we drove away : `Dunna let me clap eyes on tYree again, tha ungrateful 'ussy, tha ungrateful 'ussy! Tha 'll rue it, my wench, tha 'll rue it, an' then dunna come ter me where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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