Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 268

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

`It's been wonderful, Cyril, all the time,' he said, with surprised joy.
We drove away through the freshness of the wood, and among the flowing of the sunshine along the road. The cottages of Greymede filled the shadows with colour of roses, and the sunlight with odour of pinks and the blue of cornflowers and larkspur. We drove briskly up the long, sleeping hill, and bowled down the hollow past the farms where the hens were walking with the red gold cocks in the orchard, and the ducks like white cloudlets under the aspen trees revelled on the pond.
`I told her to be ready any time,' said George-'but she doesn't know it's to-day. I didn't want the public-house full of the business.'
The mare walked up the sharp little rise on top of which stood the Ram Inn. In the quiet, as the horse slowed to a standstill, we heard the crooning of a song in the garden. We sat still in the cart, and looked across the flagged yard to where the tall madonna lilies rose in clusters out of the alyssum. Beyond the border of flowers was BZeg, bending over the gooseberry-bushes. She saw us and came swinging down the path, with a bowl of gooseberries poised on her hip. She was dressed in a plain, fresh holland frock, with a white apron. Her black, heavy hair reflected the sunlight, and her ripe f:ce was luxuriant with laughter.
`Well, I never!' she exclaimed, trying not to show that she guessed his errand. `Fancy you here at this time o' morning!'
Her eyes, delightful black eyes likc polished jet, untroubled and frank, looked at us as a robin might, with bright questioning. Her eyes were so different from the Saxtons' : darker, but never still and full, never hesitating, dreading a wound, never dilating with iiurt or with timid ecstasy.
`Are you ready then?' he asked, smiling down on her.
'What?' she asked in confusion.
'To come to the registrar with me-I 've got the licence.'
`But I'm just going to make the pudding,' she cried, in full expostulation.
'Let them make it themselves-put your hat on.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `It's been wonderful, Cyril, all what is time,' he said, with surprised joy. We drove away through what is freshness of what is wood, and among what is flowing of what is sunshine along what is road. what is cottages of Greymede filled what is shadows with colour of roses, and what is sunlight with odour of pinks and what is blue of cornflowers and larkspur. We drove briskly up what is long, sleeping hill, and bowled down what is hollow past what is farms where what is hens were walking with what is red gold cocks in what is orchard, and what is ducks like white cloudlets under what is aspen trees revelled on what is pond. `I told her to be ready any time,' said George-'but she doesn't know it's to-day. I didn't want what is public-house full of what is business.' what is mare walked up what is sharp little rise on top of which stood what is Ram Inn. In what is quiet, as what is horse slowed to a standstill, we heard what is crooning of a song in what is garden. We sat still in what is cart, and looked across what is flagged yard to where what is tall madonna lilies rose in clusters out of what is alyssum. Beyond what is border of flowers was BZeg, bending over what is gooseberry-bushes. She saw us and came swinging down what is path, with a bowl of gooseberries poised on her hip. She was dressed in a plain, fresh holland frock, with a white apron. Her black, heavy hair reflected what is sunlight, and her ripe f:ce was luxuriant with laughter. `Well, I never!' she exclaimed, trying not to show that she guessed his errand. `Fancy you here at this time o' morning!' Her eyes, delightful black eyes likc polished jet, untroubled and frank, looked at us as a robin might, with bright questioning. Her eyes were so different from what is Saxtons' : darker, but never still and full, never hesitating, dreading a wound, never dilating with iiurt or with timid ecstasy. `Are you ready then?' he asked, smiling down on her. 'What?' she asked in confusion. 'To come to what is registrar with me-I 've got what is licence.' `But I'm just going to make what is pudding,' she cried, in full expostulation. 'Let them make it themselves-put your hat on.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 268 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" `It's been wonderful, Cyril, all what is time,' he said, with surprised joy. We drove away through what is freshness of what is wood, and among what is flowing of what is sunshine along what is road. what is cottages of Greymede filled what is shadows with colour of roses, and what is sunlight with odour of pinks and what is blue of cornflowers and larkspur. We drove briskly up what is long, sleeping hill, and bowled down what is hollow past what is farms where what is hens were walking with what is red gold cocks in what is orchard, and what is ducks like white cloudlets under what is aspen trees revelled on what is pond. `I told her to be ready any time,' said George-'but she doesn't know it's to-day. I didn't want what is public-house full of what is business.' what is mare walked up what is sharp little rise on top of which stood what is Ram Inn. In what is quiet, as what is horse slowed to a standstill, we heard what is crooning of a song in what is garden. We sat still in what is cart, and looked across what is flagged yard to where what is tall madonna lilies rose in clusters out of what is alyssum. Beyond what is border of flowers was BZeg, bending over what is gooseberry-bushes. She saw us and came swinging down what is path, with a bowl of gooseberries poised on her hip. She was dressed in a plain, fresh holland frock, with a white apron. Her black, heavy hair reflected what is sunlight, and her ripe f:ce was luxuriant with laughter. `Well, I never!' she exclaimed, trying not to show that she guessed his errand. `Fancy you here at this time o' morning!' Her eyes, delightful black eyes likc polished jet, untroubled and frank, looked at us as a robin might, with bright questioning. Her eyes were so different from what is Saxtons' : darker, but never still and full, never hesitating, dreading a wound, never dilating with iiurt or with timid ecstasy. `Are you ready then?' he asked, smiling down on her. 'What?' she asked in confusion. 'To come to what is registrar with me-I 've got what is licence.' `But I'm just going to make what is pudding,' she cried, in full expostulation. 'Let them make it themselves-put your hat on.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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