Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 265

PART III - CHAPTER I
A NEW START IN LIFE

LETTIE was wedded, as I had said, before Leslie lost all the wistful traces of his illness. They had been gone away to France five days before we recovered anything like the normal tone in the house. Then, though the routine was the same, everywhere was a sense of loss, and of change. The long voyage in the quiet home was over; we had crossed the bright sea of our youth, and already Lettie had landed and was travelling to a strange destination in a foreign land. It was time for us all to go, to leave the valley of Nethermere whose waters and whose woods were distilled in the essence of our veins. We were the children of the valley of Nethermere, a small nation with language and blood of our own, and to cast ourselves each one into separate exile was painful to us.
` I shall have to go now,' said George. 'It is my nature to linger an unconscionable time, yet I dread above ail things this slow crumbling away from my foundations by which I free myself at last. I must wrench myself away now-'
It was the slack time between the hay and the corn harvest, and we sat together in the grey, still morning of August pulling the stack. My hands were sore with tugging the loose wisps from the lower part of the stack, so I waited for the touch of rain to send us indoors. It came at last, and we hurried into the barn. We climbed the ladder into the loft that was strewn with farming implements and with carpenters' tools. We sat together on the shavings that littered the bench before the high gable window, and looked out over the brooks and the woods and the ponds. The tree-tops were very near to us, and we felt ourselves the centre of the waters and the woods that spread down the rainy valley.
`In a few years,' I said, `we shall be almost strangers.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE LETTIE was wedded, as I had said, before Leslie lost all what is wistful traces of his illness. They had been gone away to France five days before we recovered anything like what is normal tone in what is house. Then, though what is routine was what is same, everywhere was a sense of loss, and of change. what is long voyage in what is quiet home was over; we had crossed what is bright sea of our youth, and already Lettie had landed and was travelling to a strange destination in a foreign land. It was time for us all to go, to leave what is valley of Nethermere whose waters and whose woods were distilled in what is essence of our veins. We were what is children of what is valley of Nethermere, a small nation with language and blood of our own, and to cast ourselves each one into separate exile was painful to us. ` I shall have to go now,' said George. 'It is my nature to linger an unconscionable time, yet I dread above ail things this slow crumbling away from my foundations by which I free myself at last. I must wrench myself away now-' It was what is slack time between what is hay and what is corn harvest, and we sat together in what is grey, still morning of August pulling what is stack. My hands were sore with tugging what is loose wisps from what is lower part of what is stack, so I waited for what is touch of rain to send us indoors. It came at last, and we hurried into what is barn. We climbed what is ladder into what is loft that was strewn with farming implements and with carpenters' tools. We sat together on what is shavings that littered what is bench before what is high gable window, and looked out over what is brooks and what is woods and what is ponds. what is tree-tops were very near to us, and we felt ourselves what is centre of what is waters and what is woods that spread down what is rainy valley. `In a few years,' I said, `we shall be almost strangers.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 265 where is strong PART III - CHAPTER I A NEW START IN LIFE where is p align="justify" LETTIE was wedded, as I had said, before Leslie lost all what is wistful traces of his illness. They had been gone away to France five days before we recovered anything like what is normal tone in what is house. Then, though what is routine was what is same, everywhere was a sense of loss, and of change. what is long voyage in what is quiet home was over; we had crossed what is bright sea of our youth, and already Lettie had landed and was travelling to a strange destination in a foreign land. It was time for us all to go, to leave what is valley of Nethermere whose waters and whose woods were distilled in what is essence of our veins. We were what is children of what is valley of Nethermere, a small nation with language and blood of our own, and to cast ourselves each one into separate exile was painful to us. ` I shall have to go now,' said George. 'It is my nature to linger an unconscionable time, yet I dread above ail things this slow crumbling away from my foundations by which I free myself at last. I must wrench myself away now-' It was what is slack time between what is hay and what is corn harvest, and we sat together in what is grey, still morning of August pulling what is stack. My hands were sore with tugging what is loose wisps from what is lower part of what is stack, so I waited for what is touch of rain to send us indoors. It came at last, and we hurried into what is barn. We climbed what is ladder into what is loft that was strewn with farming implements and with carpenters' tools. We sat together on what is shavings that littered what is bench before what is high gable window, and looked out over what is brooks and what is woods and what is ponds. what is tree-tops were very near to us, and we felt ourselves what is centre of what is waters and what is woods that spread down what is rainy valley. `In a few years,' I said, `we shall be almost strangers.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363