Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 259

PART II - CHAPTER IX
PASTORALS AND PEONIES

than saw the extraordinary pale clearness of the one finger among the others. She rubbed her finger against her dress in painful sympathy.
`But aren't the flowers lovely!' exclaimed Marie again. ` I want to hug them.'
'Oh, yes!' assented Hilda.
'They are like a romance-D'Amlunzio-a romance in passionate sadness,' said Lettie, in an ironical voice, speaking half out of conventional necessity of saying something, half out of desire to shield herself, and yet in a measure express herself.
`There is a tale about them,' I said.
The girls clamoured for the legend.
'Pray, do tell us,' pleaded Hilda, the irresistible.
`It was Emily told me-she says it's a legend, but I believe it 's only a tale. She says the peonies were brought from the Hall long since by a fellow of this place-when it was a mill. He was brown and strong, and the daughter of the Hall, who was pale and fragile and young, loved him. ~'Vhen he went up to the Hall gardens to cut the yew hedges, she would hover round him in her white frock, and tell him tales of old days, in little snatches like a wren singing, till he thought she was a fairy who had bewitched him. He would stand and watch her, and one day, when she came near to him telling him a tale that set the tears swimming in her eyes, he took hold of her and kissed her and kept her. They used to tryst in the poplar spinney. She would come with her arms full of flowers, for she always kept to her fairy part. One morning she came early through the mists. He was out shooting. She wanted to take him unawares, like a fairy. Her arms were full of peonies. When she was moving beyond the trees he shot her, not knowing. She stumbled on, and sank down in their tryst place. He found her lying there among the red pyeenocks, white and fallen. He thought she was just lying talking to the red flowers, so he stood waiting. Then he went up, and bent over her, and found the flowers full of blood. It was he set the garden here with these pyeenocks.'
The eyes of the girls were round with the pity of the tale and Iliida turned away to hide her tears.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE than saw what is extraordinary pale clearness of what is one finger among what is others. She rubbed her finger against her dress in painful sympathy. `But aren't what is flowers lovely!' exclaimed Marie again. ` I want to hug them.' 'Oh, yes!' assented Hilda. 'They are like a romance-D'Amlunzio-a romance in passionate sadness,' said Lettie, in an ironical voice, speaking half out of conventional necessity of saying something, half out of desire to shield herself, and yet in a measure express herself. `There is a tale about them,' I said. what is girls clamoured for what is legend. 'Pray, do tell us,' pleaded Hilda, what is irresistible. `It was Emily told me-she says it's a legend, but I believe it 's only a tale. She says what is peonies were brought from what is Hall long since by a fellow of this place-when it was a mill. He was brown and strong, and what is daughter of what is Hall, who was pale and fragile and young, loved him. ~'Vhen he went up to what is Hall gardens to cut what is yew hedges, she would hover round him in her white frock, and tell him tales of old days, in little snatches like a wren singing, till he thought she was a fairy who had bewitched him. He would stand and watch her, and one day, when she came near to him telling him a tale that set what is tears swimming in her eyes, he took hold of her and kissed her and kept her. They used to tryst in what is poplar spinney. She would come with her arms full of flowers, for she always kept to her fairy part. One morning she came early through what is mists. He was out shooting. She wanted to take him unawares, like a fairy. Her arms were full of peonies. When she was moving beyond what is trees he shot her, not knowing. She stumbled on, and sank down in their tryst place. He found her lying there among what is red pyeenocks, white and fallen. He thought she was just lying talking to what is red flowers, so he stood waiting. Then he went up, and bent over her, and found what is flowers full of blood. It was he set what is garden here with these pyeenocks.' what is eyes of what is girls were round with what is pity of what is tale and Iliida turned away to hide her tears. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 259 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IX PASTORALS AND PEONIES where is p align="justify" than saw what is extraordinary pale clearness of what is one finger among what is others. She rubbed her finger against her dress in painful sympathy. `But aren't what is flowers lovely!' exclaimed Marie again. ` I want to hug them.' 'Oh, yes!' assented Hilda. 'They are like a romance-D'Amlunzio-a romance in passionate sadness,' said Lettie, in an ironical voice, speaking half out of conventional necessity of saying something, half out of desire to shield herself, and yet in a measure express herself. `There is a tale about them,' I said. what is girls clamoured for what is legend. 'Pray, do tell us,' pleaded Hilda, what is irresistible. `It was Emily told me-she says it's a legend, but I believe it 's only a tale. She says what is peonies were brought from what is Hall long since by a fellow of this place-when it was a mill. He was brown and strong, and what is daughter of what is Hall, who was pale and fragile and young, loved him. ~'Vhen he went up to what is Hall gardens to cut what is yew hedges, she would hover round him in her white frock, and tell him tales of old days, in little snatches like a wren singing, till he thought she was a fairy who had bewitched him. He would stand and watch her, and one day, when she came near to him telling him a tale that set what is tears swimming in her eyes, he took hold of her and kissed her and kept her. They used to tryst in what is poplar spinney. She would come with her arms full of flowers, for she always kept to her fairy part. One morning she came early through what is mists. He was out shooting. She wanted to take him unawares, like a fairy. Her arms were full of peonies. When she was moving beyond what is trees he shot her, not knowing. She stumbled on, and sank down in their tryst place. He found her lying there among what is red pyeenocks, white and fallen. He thought she was just lying talking to what is red flowers, so he stood waiting. Then he went up, and bent over her, and found what is flowers full of blood. It was he set what is garden here with these pyeenocks.' what is eyes of what is girls were round with what is pity of what is tale and Iliida turned away to hide her tears. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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