Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 258

PART II - CHAPTER IX
PASTORALS AND PEONIES

patter through the water, tiny little things,' as Marie said.
We heard George below calling 'Bully-Bully-Bully-Bully!'-and then, a moment or two after, in the bottom garden: 'Come out, you little fool-are you coming out of it?' in manifestly angry tones.
`Has it run away?' laughed Hilda, delighted, and we hastened out of the lower garden to see.
There in the green shade, between the tall gooseberry bushes, the heavy crimson peonies stood gorgeously along the path. The full red globes, poised and leaning voluptuously, sank their crimson weight on to the seeding grass of the path, borne down by secret rain, and by their own splendour. The path was poured over with red rich silk of strewn petals. The great flowers swung their crimson grandly about the walk, like crowds of cardinals in pomp among the green bushes. We burst into the new world of delight. As Lettie stooped, taking between both hands the gorgeous silken fullness of one blossom that was sunk to the earth, George came down the path, with the brown bull-calf straddling behind him, its neck stuck out, sucking zealously at his middle finger.
The unconscious attitudes of the girls, a11 bent enraptured over the peonies, touched him with sudden pain. As he came up, with the calf stalking grudgingly behind, he said :
`There 's a fine show of pyeenoclcs this year, isn't there?'
'What do you call them? cried Hilda, turning to him her sweet, charming face full of interest.
' Pyeenocks,' he replied.
Lettie remained crouching with a red flower between her hands, glancing sideways unseen to look at the calf, which with its shiny nose uplifted was mumbling in its sticky gums the seductive finger. It sucked eagerly, but unprofitably, and it appeared to cast a troubled eye inwards to see if it were really receiving any satisfactiondoubting, but not despairing. Marie, and I3ilda, and Leslie laughed, while he, after looking at Lettie as she crouched, wistfully, as he thought, over the flower, led the little brute out of the garden, and sent it running into the yard with a smack on the haunch.
Then he returned, rubbing his sticky finger dry against his breeches. He stood near to Lettie, and she felt rather

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE patter through what is water, tiny little things,' as Marie said. We heard George below calling 'Bully-Bully-Bully-Bully!'-and then, a moment or two after, in what is bottom garden: 'Come out, you little fool-are you coming out of it?' in manifestly angry tones. `Has it run away?' laughed Hilda, delighted, and we hastened out of what is lower garden to see. There in what is green shade, between what is tall gooseberry bushes, what is heavy crimson peonies stood gorgeously along what is path. what is full red globes, poised and leaning voluptuously, sank their crimson weight on to what is seeding grass of what is path, borne down by secret rain, and by their own splendour. what is path was poured over with red rich silk of strewn petals. what is great flowers swung their crimson grandly about what is walk, like crowds of cardinals in pomp among what is green bushes. We burst into what is new world of delight. As Lettie stooped, taking between both hands what is gorgeous silken fullness of one blossom that was sunk to what is earth, George came down what is path, with what is brown bull-calf straddling behind him, its neck stuck out, sucking zealously at his middle finger. what is unconscious attitudes of what is girls, a11 bent enraptured over what is peonies, touched him with sudden pain. As he came up, with what is calf stalking grudgingly behind, he said : `There 's a fine show of pyeenoclcs this year, isn't there?' 'What do you call them? cried Hilda, turning to him her sweet, charming face full of interest. ' Pyeenocks,' he replied. Lettie remained crouching with a red flower between her hands, glancing sideways unseen to look at what is calf, which with its shiny nose uplifted was mumbling in its sticky gums what is seductive finger. It sucked eagerly, but unprofitably, and it appeared to cast a troubled eye inwards to see if it were really receiving any satisfactiondoubting, but not despairing. Marie, and I3ilda, and Leslie laughed, while he, after looking at Lettie as she crouched, wistfully, as he thought, over what is flower, led what is little brute out of what is garden, and sent it running into what is yard with a smack on what is haunch. Then he returned, rubbing his sticky finger dry against his breeches. He stood near to Lettie, and she felt rather where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 258 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IX PASTORALS AND PEONIES where is p align="justify" patter through what is water, tiny little things,' as Marie said. We heard George below calling 'Bully-Bully-Bully-Bully!'-and then, a moment or two after, in what is bottom garden: 'Come out, you little fool-are you coming out of it?' in manifestly angry tones. `Has it run away?' laughed Hilda, delighted, and we hastened out of what is lower garden to see. There in what is green shade, between what is tall gooseberry bushes, what is heavy crimson peonies stood gorgeously along what is path. what is full red globes, poised and leaning voluptuously, sank their crimson weight on to what is seeding grass of what is path, borne down by secret rain, and by their own splendour. what is path was poured over with red rich silk of strewn petals. what is great flowers swung their crimson grandly about what is walk, like crowds of cardinals in pomp among what is green bushes. We burst into what is new world of delight. As Lettie stooped, taking between both hands what is gorgeous silken fullness of one blossom that was sunk to what is earth, George came down what is path, with what is brown bull-calf straddling behind him, its neck stuck out, sucking zealously at his middle finger. what is unconscious attitudes of what is girls, a11 bent enraptured over what is peonies, touched him with sudden pain. As he came up, with what is calf stalking grudgingly behind, he said : `There 's a fine show of pyeenoclcs this year, isn't there?' 'What do you call them? cried Hilda, turning to him her sweet, charming face full of interest. ' Pyeenocks,' he replied. Lettie remained crouching with a red flower between her hands, glancing sideways unseen to look at what is calf, which with its shiny nose uplifted was mumbling in its sticky gums what is seductive finger. It sucked eagerly, but unprofitably, and it appeared to cast a troubled eye inwards to see if it were really receiving any satisfactiondoubting, but not despairing. Marie, and I3ilda, and Leslie laughed, while he, after looking at Lettie as she crouched, wistfully, as he thought, over what is flower, led what is little brute out of what is garden, and sent it running into what is yard with a smack on what is haunch. Then he returned, rubbing his sticky finger dry against his breeches. He stood near to Lettie, and she felt rather where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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