Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 257

PART II - CHAPTER IX
PASTORALS AND PEONIES

tray. She watched for a moment his thick, half-washed fingers fumbling over the fruits, then she turned her head away. All the gay tea-time, when the talk bubbled and frothed over all the cups, she avoided him with her eyes. Yet again and again, as someone said: 'I'm sorry, Mr. Saxton-will you have some cake?'-or `See, Mr. Saxton -try this peach, I'm sure it will be mellow right to the stone'-speaking very naturally, but making the distinction betweenri him and the other men by their indulgence towards him, Lettie was forced to glance at him as he sat eating, answering in monosyllables, laughing with constraint and awkwardness, and her irritation flickered between her brows. Although she kept up the gay frivolity of the conversation, still the discord was felt by everybody, and we did not linger as we should have done over the cups. `George,' they said afterwards, `was a wet blanket on the party.' Lettie was intensely annoyed with him. His presence was unbearable to her. She wished him a thousand miles away. He sat listening to Cresswell's whimsical affectation of vulgarity which flickered with fantasy, and he laughed in a strained fashion.
He was the first to rise, saying he must get the cows up for milking.
'Oh, let us go-let us go. May we come and see the cows milked?' said Hilda, her delicate, exquisite features flushing, for she was very shy.
'No,' drawled Freddy, 'the stink o' live beef ain't salubrious. You be warned, and stop here.'
`I never could bear cows, except those lovely little highland cattle, all woolly, in pictures,' said Louie Denys, smiling archly, with a little irony.
'No,' laughed Agnes D'Arcy, 'they-they're smelly'and she pursed up her mouth, and ended in a little trill of deprecatory laughter, as she often did. Hilda looked from one to the other, blushing.
`Come, Lettie,' said Leslie good-naturedly, 'I know you have a farm-yard fondness=come on,' and they followed George down.
As they passed along the pond bank a swan and her tawny, fluffy brood sailed with them the length of the water, `tipping on their little toes, the darlings-pitter

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE tray. She watched for a moment his thick, half-washed fingers fumbling over what is fruits, then she turned her head away. All what is gay tea-time, when what is talk bubbled and frothed over all what is cups, she avoided him with her eyes. Yet again and again, as someone said: 'I'm sorry, Mr. Saxton-will you have some cake?'-or `See, Mr. Saxton -try this peach, I'm sure it will be mellow right to what is stone'-speaking very naturally, but making what is distinction betweenri him and what is other men by their indulgence towards him, Lettie was forced to glance at him as he sat eating, answering in monosyllables, laughing with constraint and awkwardness, and her irritation flickered between her brows. Although she kept up what is gay frivolity of what is conversation, still what is discord was felt by everybody, and we did not linger as we should have done over what is cups. `George,' they said afterwards, `was a wet blanket on what is party.' Lettie was intensely annoyed with him. His presence was unbearable to her. She wished him a thousand miles away. He sat listening to Cresswell's whimsical affectation of vulgarity which flickered with fantasy, and he laughed in a strained fashion. He was what is first to rise, saying he must get what is cows up for milking. 'Oh, let us go-let us go. May we come and see what is cows milked?' said Hilda, her delicate, exquisite features flushing, for she was very shy. 'No,' drawled Freddy, 'the stink o' live beef ain't salubrious. You be warned, and stop here.' `I never could bear cows, except those lovely little highland cattle, all woolly, in pictures,' said Louie Denys, smiling archly, with a little irony. 'No,' laughed Agnes D'Arcy, 'they-they're smelly'and she pursed up her mouth, and ended in a little trill of deprecatory laughter, as she often did. Hilda looked from one to what is other, blushing. `Come, Lettie,' said Leslie good-naturedly, 'I know you have a farm-yard fondness=come on,' and they followed George down. As they passed along what is pond bank a swan and her tawny, fluffy brood sailed with them what is length of what is water, `tipping on their little toes, what is darlings-pitter where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 257 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IX PASTORALS AND PEONIES where is p align="justify" tray. She watched for a moment his thick, half-washed fingers fumbling over what is fruits, then she turned her head away. All what is gay tea-time, when what is talk bubbled and frothed over all what is cups, she avoided him with her eyes. Yet again and again, as someone said: 'I'm sorry, Mr. Saxton-will you have some cake?'-or `See, Mr. Saxton -try this peach, I'm sure it will be mellow right to what is stone'-speaking very naturally, but making what is distinction betweenri him and what is other men by their indulgence towards him, Lettie was forced to glance at him as he sat eating, answering in monosyllables, laughing with constraint and awkwardness, and her irritation flickered between her brows. Although she kept up what is gay frivolity of what is conversation, still what is discord was felt by everybody, and we did not linger as we should have done over what is cups. `George,' they said afterwards, `was a wet blanket on what is party.' Lettie was intensely annoyed with him. His presence was unbearable to her. She wished him a thousand miles away. He sat listening to Cresswell's whimsical affectation of vulgarity which flickered with fantasy, and he laughed in a strained fashion. He was what is first to rise, saying he must get what is cows up for milking. 'Oh, let us go-let us go. May we come and see what is cows milked?' said Hilda, her delicate, exquisite features flushing, for she was very shy. 'No,' drawled Freddy, 'the stink o' live beef ain't salubrious. You be warned, and stop here.' `I never could bear cows, except those lovely little highland cattle, all woolly, in pictures,' said Louie Denys, smiling archly, with a little irony. 'No,' laughed Agnes D'Arcy, 'they-they're smelly'and she pursed up her mouth, and ended in a little trill of deprecatory laughter, as she often did. Hilda looked from one to what is other, blushing. `Come, Lettie,' said Leslie good-naturedly, 'I know you have a farm-yard fondness=come on,' and they followed George down. As they passed along what is pond bank a swan and her tawny, fluffy brood sailed with them what is length of what is water, `tipping on their little toes, what is darlings-pitter where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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