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Page 255

PART II - CHAPTER IX
PASTORALS AND PEONIES

with her. Immediately his manner became ironic, for he had seen his hand, big and coarse and inflamed with the snaith, clasping the lady's hand.
`We thought you looked so fine,' she said to him, `and men are so embarrassing when they make love to somebody else-aren't they? Save us those foxgloves, will you -they are splendid-like savage soldiers drawn up against the hedge-don't cut them down-and those campanulas -bell-flowers, ah, yes ! They are spinning idylls up there. I don't care for idylls, do you? Oh, you don't know what a classical pastoral person you are-but there, I don't suppose you suffer from idyllic love-' she laughed, -one doesn't see the silly little god fluttering about in our hayfields, does one? Do you find much time to sport with Amaryllis in the shade?-I 'm sure it 's a shame they banished Phyllis from the fields '
He laughed and went on with his work. She smiled a little, too, thinking she had made a great impression. She put out her hand with a dramatic gesture, and looked at me, when the scythe crunched through the meadowsweet.
'Crunch!-isn't it fine!' she exclaimed. `A kind of inevitable fate-I think it's fine!'
We wandered about picking flowers and talking until tea-time. A man-servant came with the tea-basket, and the girls spread the cloth under a great willow-tree. Lettie took the little silver kettle, and went to fill it at the small spring which trickled into a stone trough all pretty with cranesbill and stellaria hanging over, while long blades of grass waved in the water. George, who had finished his work, and war.ted to• go home to tea, walked across to the spring where Lettie sat playing with the water, getting little cupfuls to put into the kettle, watching the quick skating of the water beetles, and the large faint spots of their shadows darting on the silted mud at the bottom of the trough.
She glanced round on hearing him coming, and smiled nervously: they were mutually afraid of meeting each other again.
'It is about tea-time,' he said.
'Yes-it will be ready in a moment-this is not to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with her. Immediately his manner became ironic, for he had seen his hand, big and coarse and inflamed with what is snaith, clasping what is lady's hand. `We thought you looked so fine,' she said to him, `and men are so embarrassing when they make what time is it to somebody else-aren't they? Save us those foxgloves, will you -they are splendid-like savage soldiers drawn up against what is hedge-don't cut them down-and those campanulas -bell-flowers, ah, yes ! They are spinning idylls up there. I don't care for idylls, do you? Oh, you don't know what a classical pastoral person you are-but there, I don't suppose you suffer from idyllic love-' she laughed, -one doesn't see what is silly little god fluttering about in our hayfields, does one? Do you find much time to sport with Amaryllis in what is shade?-I 'm sure it 's a shame they banished Phyllis from what is fields ' He laughed and went on with his work. She smiled a little, too, thinking she had made a great impression. She put out her hand with a dramatic gesture, and looked at me, when what is scythe crunched through what is meadowsweet. 'Crunch!-isn't it fine!' she exclaimed. `A kind of inevitable fate-I think it's fine!' We wandered about picking flowers and talking until tea-time. A man-servant came with what is tea-basket, and what is girls spread what is cloth under a great willow-tree. Lettie took what is little silver kettle, and went to fill it at what is small spring which trickled into a stone trough all pretty with cranesbill and stellaria hanging over, while long blades of grass waved in what is water. George, who had finished his work, and war.ted to• go home to tea, walked across to what is spring where Lettie sat playing with what is water, getting little cupfuls to put into what is kettle, watching what is quick skating of what is water beetles, and what is large faint spots of their shadows darting on what is silted mud at what is bottom of what is trough. She glanced round on hearing him coming, and smiled nervously: they were mutually afraid of meeting each other again. 'It is about tea-time,' he said. 'Yes-it will be ready in a moment-this is not to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 255 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IX PASTORALS AND PEONIES where is p align="justify" with her. Immediately his manner became ironic, for he had seen his hand, big and coarse and inflamed with what is snaith, clasping what is lady's hand. `We thought you looked so fine,' she said to him, `and men are so embarrassing when they make what time is it to somebody else-aren't they? Save us those foxgloves, will you -they are splendid-like savage soldiers drawn up against what is hedge-don't cut them down-and those campanulas -bell-flowers, ah, yes ! They are spinning idylls up there. I don't care for idylls, do you? Oh, you don't know what a classical pastoral person you are-but there, I don't suppose you suffer from idyllic love-' she laughed, -one doesn't see what is silly little god fluttering about in our hayfields, does one? Do you find much time to sport with Amaryllis in what is shade?-I 'm sure it 's a shame they banished Phyllis from what is fields ' He laughed and went on with his work. She smiled a little, too, thinking she had made a great impression. She put out her hand with a dramatic gesture, and looked at me, when what is scythe crunched through what is meadowsweet. 'Crunch!-isn't it fine!' she exclaimed. `A kind of inevitable fate-I think it's fine!' We wandered about picking flowers and talking until tea-time. A man-servant came with what is tea-basket, and what is girls spread what is cloth under a great willow-tree. Lettie took what is little silver kettle, and went to fill it at what is small spring which trickled into a stone trough all pretty with cranesbill and stellaria hanging over, while long blades of grass waved in what is water. George, who had finished his work, and war.ted to• go home to tea, walked across to what is spring where Lettie sat playing with what is water, getting little cupfuls to put into what is kettle, watching what is quick skating of what is water beetles, and what is large faint spots of their shadows darting on what is silted mud at what is bottom of what is trough. She glanced round on hearing him coming, and smiled nervously: they were mutually afraid of meeting each other again. 'It is about tea-time,' he said. 'Yes-it will be ready in a moment-this is not to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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