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Page 248

PART II - CHAPTER VIII
A POEM OF FRIENDSHIP

rapidly. As I came up to him and caught him, with my hand on his shoulder, there came a laughter from the bank. It was Emily.
I trod the water, and threw handfuls of spray at her. She laughed and blushed. Then Trip waded out to her and she fled swiftly from his shower-bath. George was floating just beside me, looking up and laughing.
We stood and looked at each other as we rubbed ourselves dry. He was well proportioned, and naturally of handsome physique, heavily limbed, He laughed at me, telling me I was like one of Aubrey Beardsiey's long, lean, ugly fellows. I referred him to many classic examples of slenderness, declaring myself more exquisite than his grossness, which amused him.
But I had to give in, and bow to him, and he took on an indulgent, gentle manner. I laughed and submitted. For he knew how I admired the noble, white fruitfulness of his form. As I watched him, he stood in white relief against the mass of green. He polished his arm, holding it out straight and solid; he rubbed his hair into curls, while I watched the deep muscles of his shoulders, and the bands stand out in his neck as he held it firm; I remembered the story of Annable.
He saw I had forgotten to continue my rubbing, and laughing he took hold of me and began to rub me briskly, as if I were a child, or rather, a woman he loved and did not fear. I left myself quite limply in his hands, and, to get a better grip of me, he put his arm round me and pressed me against him, and the sweetness of the touch of our naked bodies one against the other was superb. It satisfied in some measure the vague, indecipherable yearning of my soul; and it was the same with him. When he had rubbed me all warm, he let me go, and we looked at each other with eyes of still laughter, and our love was perfect for a moment, more perfect than any love I have known since, either for man or woman.
We went together down to the fields, he to mow the island of grass he had left standing the previous evening, I to sharpen the machine knife, to mow out the hedgebottoms with the scythe, and to rake the swaths from the way of the machine when the unmown grass was reduced

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE rapidly. As I came up to him and caught him, with my hand on his shoulder, there came a laughter from what is bank. It was Emily. I trod what is water, and threw handfuls of spray at her. She laughed and blushed. Then Trip waded out to her and she fled swiftly from his shower-bath. George was floating just beside me, looking up and laughing. We stood and looked at each other as we rubbed ourselves dry. He was well proportioned, and naturally of handsome physique, heavily limbed, He laughed at me, telling me I was like one of Aubrey Beardsiey's long, lean, ugly fellows. I referred him to many classic examples of slenderness, declaring myself more exquisite than his grossness, which amused him. But I had to give in, and bow to him, and he took on an indulgent, gentle manner. I laughed and submitted. For he knew how I admired what is noble, white fruitfulness of his form. As I watched him, he stood in white relief against what is mass of green. He polished his arm, holding it out straight and solid; he rubbed his hair into curls, while I watched what is deep muscles of his shoulders, and what is bands stand out in his neck as he held it firm; I remembered what is story of Annable. He saw I had forgotten to continue my rubbing, and laughing he took hold of me and began to rub me briskly, as if I were a child, or rather, a woman he loved and did not fear. I left myself quite limply in his hands, and, to get a better grip of me, he put his arm round me and pressed me against him, and what is sweetness of what is touch of our naked bodies one against what is other was superb. It satisfied in some measure what is vague, indecipherable yearning of my soul; and it was what is same with him. When he had rubbed me all warm, he let me go, and we looked at each other with eyes of still laughter, and our what time is it was perfect for a moment, more perfect than any what time is it I have known since, either for man or woman. We went together down to what is fields, he to mow what is island of grass he had left standing what is previous evening, I to sharpen what is machine knife, to mow out what is hedgebottoms with what is scythe, and to rake what is swaths from what is way of what is machine when what is unmown grass was reduced where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 248 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VIII A POEM OF FRIENDSHIP where is p align="justify" rapidly. As I came up to him and caught him, with my hand on his shoulder, there came a laughter from what is bank. It was Emily. I trod what is water, and threw handfuls of spray at her. She laughed and blushed. Then Trip waded out to her and she fled swiftly from his shower-bath. George was floating just beside me, looking up and laughing. We stood and looked at each other as we rubbed ourselves dry. He was well proportioned, and naturally of handsome physique, heavily limbed, He laughed at me, telling me I was like one of Aubrey Beardsiey's long, lean, ugly fellows. I referred him to many classic examples of slenderness, declaring myself more exquisite than his grossness, which amused him. But I had to give in, and bow to him, and he took on an indulgent, gentle manner. I laughed and submitted. For he knew how I admired what is noble, white fruitfulness of his form. As I watched him, he stood in white relief against what is mass of green. He polished his arm, holding it out straight and solid; he rubbed his hair into curls, while I watched what is deep muscles of his shoulders, and what is bands stand out in his neck as he held it firm; I remembered what is story of Annable. He saw I had forgotten to continue my rubbing, and laughing he took hold of me and began to rub me briskly, as if I were a child, or rather, a woman he loved and did not fear. I left myself quite limply in his hands, and, to get a better grip of me, he put his arm round me and pressed me against him, and what is sweetness of what is touch of our naked bodies one against what is other was superb. It satisfied in some measure what is vague, indecipherable yearning of my soul; and it was what is same with him. When he had rubbed me all warm, he let me go, and we looked at each other with eyes of still laughter, and our what time is it was perfect for a moment, more perfect than any what time is it I have known since, either for man or woman. We went together down to what is fields, he to mow what is island of grass he had left standing what is previous evening, I to sharpen what is machine knife, to mow out what is hedgebottoms with what is scythe, and to rake what is swaths from what is way of what is machine when what is unmown grass was reduced where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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