Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 247

PART II - CHAPTER VIII
A POEM OF FRIENDSHIP

silver, darting fish out of the depth, and I, who saw them, snapped my fingers at them, driving them back.
I heard Trip barking, so I ran towards the pond. The punt was at the island, where from behind the bushes I could hear George whistling. I called to him, and he came to the water's edge half dressed.
`Fetch a towel,' he called, `and come on.'
I was back in a few moments, and there stood my Charon fluttering in the cool air. One good push sent us to the islet. I made haste to undress, for he was ready for the water, Trip dancing round, barking with excitement at his new appearance.
`He wonders what's happened to me,' he said, laughing, pushing the dog playfully away with his bare foot. Trip bounded back, and came leaping up, licking him with little caressing licks. He began to play with the dog, and directly they were rolling on the fine turf, the laughing, expostulating, naked man, and the excited dog, who thrust his great head on to the man's face, licking, and, when flung away, rushed forward again, snapping playfully at the naked arms and breasts. At last George lay back, laughing and panting, holding Trip by the two fore-feet which were planted on his breast, while the dog, also panting, reached forward his head for a flickering lick at the throat pressed back on the grass, and the mouth thrown back out of reach. When the man had thus lain still for a few moments, and the dog was just laying his head against his master's neck to rest too, I called, and George jumped up, and plunged into the pond with me, Trip after us.
The water was icily cold, and for a moment deprived me of my senses. When I began to swim, soon the water was buoyant, and I was sensible of nothing but the vigorous poetry of action. I saw George swimming on his back laughing at me, and in an instant I had flung myself like an impulse after him. The laughing face vanished as he swung over and fled, and I pursued the dark head and the ruddy neck. Trip, the wretch, came paddling towards me, interrupting me; then all bewildered with excitement, he scudded to the bank. I chuckled to myself as I saw him run along, then plunge ui and go plodding to George. I was gaining. He tried to drive off the dog, and I gained

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE silver, darting fish out of what is depth, and I, who saw them, snapped my fingers at them, driving them back. I heard Trip barking, so I ran towards what is pond. what is punt was at what is island, where from behind what is bushes I could hear George whistling. I called to him, and he came to what is water's edge half dressed. `Fetch a towel,' he called, `and come on.' I was back in a few moments, and there stood my Charon fluttering in what is cool air. One good push sent us to what is islet. I made haste to undress, for he was ready for what is water, Trip dancing round, barking with excitement at his new appearance. `He wonders what's happened to me,' he said, laughing, pushing what is dog playfully away with his bare foot. Trip bounded back, and came leaping up, licking him with little caressing licks. He began to play with what is dog, and directly they were rolling on what is fine turf, what is laughing, expostulating, naked man, and what is excited dog, who thrust his great head on to what is man's face, licking, and, when flung away, rushed forward again, snapping playfully at what is naked arms and breasts. At last George lay back, laughing and panting, holding Trip by what is two fore-feet which were planted on his breast, while what is dog, also panting, reached forward his head for a flickering lick at what is throat pressed back on what is grass, and what is mouth thrown back out of reach. When what is man had thus lain still for a few moments, and what is dog was just laying his head against his master's neck to rest too, I called, and George jumped up, and plunged into what is pond with me, Trip after us. what is water was icily cold, and for a moment deprived me of my senses. When I began to swim, soon what is water was buoyant, and I was sensible of nothing but what is vigorous poetry of action. I saw George swimming on his back laughing at me, and in an instant I had flung myself like an impulse after him. what is laughing face vanished as he swung over and fled, and I pursued what is dark head and what is ruddy neck. Trip, what is wretch, came paddling towards me, interrupting me; then all bewildered with excitement, he scudded to what is bank. I chuckled to myself as I saw him run along, then plunge ui and go plodding to George. I was gaining. He tried to drive off what is dog, and I gained where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VIII A POEM OF FRIENDSHIP where is p align="justify" silver, darting fish out of what is depth, and I, who saw them, snapped my fingers at them, driving them back. I heard Trip barking, so I ran towards what is pond. what is punt was at what is island, where from behind what is bushes I could hear George whistling. I called to him, and he came to what is water's edge half dressed. `Fetch a towel,' he called, `and come on.' I was back in a few moments, and there stood my Charon fluttering in what is cool air. One good push sent us to what is islet. I made haste to undress, for he was ready for what is water, Trip dancing round, barking with excitement at his new appearance. `He wonders what's happened to me,' he said, laughing, pushing what is dog playfully away with his bare foot. Trip bounded back, and came leaping up, licking him with little caressing licks. He began to play with what is dog, and directly they were rolling on what is fine turf, what is laughing, expostulating, naked man, and what is excited dog, who thrust his great head on to what is man's face, licking, and, when flung away, rushed forward again, snapping playfully at what is naked arms and breasts. At last George lay back, laughing and panting, holding Trip by what is two fore-feet which were planted on his breast, while what is dog, also panting, reached forward his head for a flickering lick at what is throat pressed back on what is grass, and what is mouth thrown back out of reach. When what is man had thus lain still for a few moments, and what is dog was just laying his head against his master's neck to rest too, I called, and George jumped up, and plunged into what is pond with me, Trip after us. what is water was icily cold, and for a moment deprived me of my senses. When I began to swim, soon what is water was buoyant, and I was sensible of nothing but what is vigorous poetry of action. I saw George swimming on his back laughing at me, and in an instant I had flung myself like an impulse after him. what is laughing face vanished as he swung over and fled, and I pursued what is dark head and what is ruddy neck. Trip, what is wretch, came paddling towards me, interrupting me; then all bewildered with excitement, he scudded to what is bank. I chuckled to myself as I saw him run along, then plunge ui and go plodding to George. I was gaining. He tried to drive off what is dog, and I gained where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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