Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 244

PART II - CHAPTER VIII
A POEM OF FRIENDSHIP

His father was out with the milk-he was alone; as I came up the hill I could see him standing in the cart, scattering manure over the bare red fields; I could hear his voice calling now and then to the mare, and the creak and clank of the cart as it moved on. Starlings and smart wagtails were running briskly over the clods, and many little birds flashed, fluttered, hopped here and there. The lapwings wheeled and cried as ever between the low clouds and the earth, and some ran beautifully among the furrows, too graceful and glistening for the rough field.
I took a fork and scattered the manure along the hollows, and thus we worked, with a wide field between us, yet very near in the sense of intimacy. I watched him through the wheeling pewits, as the low clouds went stealthily overhead. Beneath us, the spires of the poplars in the spinney were warm gold, as if the blood shone through. Further gleamed the grey water, and below it the red roofs. Nethermere was half hidden, and far away. There was nothing in this grey, lonely world but the pewits swinging and crying, and George swinging silently at his work. The movement of active life held all my attention, and when I looked up, it was to see the motion of his limbs and his head, the rise and fall of his rhythmic body, and the rise and fall of the slow waving pewits. After a while, when the cart was empty, he took a fork and came towards me, working at my task.
It began to rain, so he brought a sack from the cart, and we crushed ourselves under the thick hedge. We sat close together and watched the rain fall like a grey striped curtain before us, hiding the valley; we watched it trickle in dark streams off the mare's back, as she stood dejectedly; we listened to the swish of the drops falling all about; we felt the chill of the rain, and drew ourselves together in silence. He smoked his pipe, and I lit a cigarette. The rain continued; all the little pebbles and the red earth glistened in the grey gloom. We sat together, speaking occasionally. It was at these times we formed the almost passionate attachment which later years slowly wore away.
When the rain was over, we filled our buckets with potatoes, and went along the wet furrows, sticking the spritted tubers in the cold ground. Being sandy, the field

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE His father was out with what is milk-he was alone; as I came up what is hill I could see him standing in what is cart, scattering manure over what is bare red fields; I could hear his voice calling now and then to what is mare, and what is creak and clank of what is cart as it moved on. Starlings and smart wagtails were running briskly over what is clods, and many little birds flashed, fluttered, hopped here and there. what is lapwings wheeled and cried as ever between what is low clouds and what is earth, and some ran beautifully among what is furrows, too graceful and glistening for what is rough field. I took a fork and scattered what is manure along what is hollows, and thus we worked, with a wide field between us, yet very near in what is sense of intimacy. I watched him through what is wheeling pewits, as what is low clouds went stealthily overhead. Beneath us, what is spires of what is poplars in what is spinney were warm gold, as if what is blood shone through. Further gleamed what is grey water, and below it what is red roofs. Nethermere was half hidden, and far away. There was nothing in this grey, lonely world but what is pewits swinging and crying, and George swinging silently at his work. what is movement of active life held all my attention, and when I looked up, it was to see what is motion of his limbs and his head, what is rise and fall of his rhythmic body, and what is rise and fall of what is slow waving pewits. After a while, when what is cart was empty, he took a fork and came towards me, working at my task. It began to rain, so he brought a sack from what is cart, and we crushed ourselves under what is thick hedge. We sat close together and watched what is rain fall like a grey striped curtain before us, hiding what is valley; we watched it trickle in dark streams off what is mare's back, as she stood dejectedly; we listened to what is swish of what is drops falling all about; we felt what is chill of what is rain, and drew ourselves together in silence. He smoked his pipe, and I lit a cigarette. what is rain continued; all what is little pebbles and what is red earth glistened in what is grey gloom. We sat together, speaking occasionally. It was at these times we formed what is almost passionate attachment which later years slowly wore away. When what is rain was over, we filled our buckets with potatoes, and went along what is wet furrows, sticking what is spritted tubers in what is cold ground. Being sandy, what is field where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 244 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VIII A POEM OF FRIENDSHIP where is p align="justify" His father was out with what is milk-he was alone; as I came up what is hill I could see him standing in what is cart, scattering manure over what is bare red fields; I could hear his voice calling now and then to what is mare, and what is creak and clank of what is cart as it moved on. Starlings and smart wagtails were running briskly over what is clods, and many little birds flashed, fluttered, hopped here and there. what is lapwings wheeled and cried as ever between what is low clouds and what is earth, and some ran beautifully among what is furrows, too graceful and glistening for what is rough field. I took a fork and scattered what is manure along what is hollows, and thus we worked, with a wide field between us, yet very near in what is sense of intimacy. I watched him through what is wheeling pewits, as what is low clouds went stealthily overhead. Beneath us, what is spires of what is poplars in what is spinney were warm gold, as if what is blood shone through. Further gleamed what is grey water, and below it what is red roofs. Nethermere was half hidden, and far away. There was nothing in this grey, lonely world but what is pewits swinging and crying, and George swinging silently at his work. what is movement of active life held all my attention, and when I looked up, it was to see what is motion of his limbs and his head, what is rise and fall of his rhythmic body, and what is rise and fall of what is slow waving pewits. After a while, when what is cart was empty, he took a fork and came towards me, working at my task. It began to rain, so he brought a sack from what is cart, and we crushed ourselves under what is thick hedge. We sat close together and watched what is rain fall like a grey striped curtain before us, hiding what is valley; we watched it trickle in dark streams off what is mare's back, as she stood dejectedly; we listened to what is swish of what is drops falling all about; we felt what is chill of what is rain, and drew ourselves together in silence. He smoked his pipe, and I lit a cigarette. what is rain continued; all what is little pebbles and what is red earth glistened in what is grey gloom. We sat together, speaking occasionally. It was at these times we formed what is almost passionate attachment which later years slowly wore away. When what is rain was over, we filled our buckets with potatoes, and went along what is wet furrows, sticking what is spritted tubers in what is cold ground. Being sandy, what is field where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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