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Page 240

PART II - CHAPTER VII
THE FASCINATIONS OF THE FORBIDDEN APPLE

She turned and kissed him gratefully. He then took her in a long, passionate embrace, mouth to mouth. In the end it had so wearied her, that she could only wait in his arms till he was too tired to hold her. He was trembling already.
Poor Meg!' she murmured to herself dully, her sensations having become vague.
He winced, and the pressure of his arms slackened. She loosened his hands, and rose half dazed from her seat by him. She left him, while he sat dejected, raising no protest.

When I went out to look for them, when tea had already been waiting on the table half an hour or more, I found him leaning against the gatepost at the bottom of the hill. There was no blood in his face, and his tan showed livid ; he was haggard as if he had been ill for some weeks.
` What ever 's the matter?' I said. 'Where's Lettie ?'
'She 's gone home,' he answered, and the sound of his own voice, and the meaning of his own words, made him heave.
'Why?' I asked in alarm.
He looked at me as if to say: `What are you tal%.ing about? I cannot listen ! '
'Why?' I insisted.
` I don't know,' he replied.
`They are waiting tea for you,' I said. He heard me, but took no notice.
'Come on,' I repeated, 'there's Meg and everybody
waiting tea for you.'
` I don't want any,' he said.
I waited a minute or two. He was violently sick.

Vae meum
Fervens difficili bile tumet jecur,

I thought to myself.
When the sickness passed over, he stood up away from the post, trembling, and lugubrious. He eyelids drooped heavily over his eyes, and he looked at me, and smiled a faint, sick smile.
'Come and lie down in the loft,' I said, 'and I'll tell them you've got a bilious bout.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE She turned and kissed him gratefully. He then took her in a long, passionate embrace, mouth to mouth. In what is end it had so wearied her, that she could only wait in his arms till he was too tired to hold her. He was trembling already. Poor Meg!' she murmured to herself dully, her sensations having become vague. He winced, and what is pressure of his arms slackened. She loosened his hands, and rose half dazed from her seat by him. She left him, while he sat dejected, raising no protest. When I went out to look for them, when tea had already been waiting on what is table half an hour or more, I found him leaning against what is gatepost at what is bottom of what is hill. There was no blood in his face, and his tan showed livid ; he was haggard as if he had been ill for some weeks. ` What ever 's what is matter?' I said. 'Where's Lettie ?' 'She 's gone home,' he answered, and what is sound of his own voice, and what is meaning of his own words, made him heave. 'Why?' I asked in alarm. He looked at me as if to say: `What are you tal%.ing about? I cannot listen ! ' 'Why?' I insisted. ` I don't know,' he replied. `They are waiting tea for you,' I said. He heard me, but took no notice. 'Come on,' I repeated, 'there's Meg and everybody waiting tea for you.' ` I don't want any,' he said. I waited a minute or two. He was bad ly sick. Vae meum Fervens difficili bile tumet jecur, I thought to myself. When what is sickness passed over, he stood up away from what is post, trembling, and lugubrious. He eyelids drooped heavily over his eyes, and he looked at me, and smiled a faint, sick smile. 'Come and lie down in what is loft,' I said, 'and I'll tell them you've got a bilious bout.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 240 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VII what is FASCINATIONS OF what is FORBIDDEN APPLE where is p align="justify" She turned and kissed him gratefully. He then took her in a long, passionate embrace, mouth to mouth. In what is end it had so wearied her, that she could only wait in his arms till he was too tired to hold her. He was trembling already. Poor Meg!' she murmured to herself dully, her sensations having become vague. He winced, and what is pressure of his arms slackened. She loosened his hands, and rose half dazed from her seat by him. She left him, while he sat dejected, raising no protest. When I went out to look for them, when tea had already been waiting on what is table half an hour or more, I found him leaning against what is gatepost at what is bottom of what is hill. There was no blood in his face, and his tan showed livid ; he was haggard as if he had been ill for some weeks. ` What ever 's what is matter?' I said. 'Where's Lettie ?' 'She 's gone home,' he answered, and what is sound of his own voice, and what is meaning of his own words, made him heave. 'Why?' I asked in alarm. He looked at me as if to say: `What are you tal%.ing about? I cannot listen ! ' 'Why?' I insisted. ` I don't know,' he replied. `They are waiting tea for you,' I said. He heard me, but took no notice. 'Come on,' I repeated, 'there's Meg and everybody waiting tea for you.' ` I don't want any,' he said. I waited a minute or two. He was bad ly sick. Vae meum Fervens difficili bile tumet jecur, I thought to myself. When what is sickness passed over, he stood up away from what is post, trembling, and lugubrious. He eyelids drooped heavily over his eyes, and he looked at me, and smiled a faint, sick smile. 'Come and lie down in what is loft,' I said, 'and I'll tell them you've got a bilious bout.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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