Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 238

PART II - CHAPTER VII
THE FASCINATIONS OF THE FORBIDDEN APPLE

He stood looking at her; his face was coloured only by the grey-brown tan; his eyes, the dark, self-mistrustful eyes of the family, were darker than ever, dilated with misery of helplessness ; and she was infinitely pitiful. She wanted to cry in her yearning.
`Shall we go into the wood for a few minutes?' she said, in a low, tremulous voice, as they turned aside.
The wood was high and warm. Along the ridings the i forget-me-nots were knee deep, stretching, glimmering into the distance like the Milky Way through the night. They left the tall, flower-tangled paths to go in among the bluebells, breaking through the close-pressed flowers and ferns till they carne to an oak which had fallen across the hazels, where they sat half screened. The hyacinths drooped magnificently with an overweight of purple, or they stood pale and erect, like unripe ears of purple corn, Heavy bees swung down in a blunder of extravagance among the purple flowers. They were intoxicated even with the sight of so much blue. The sound of their hearty, wanton humming came clear upon the solemn boom of the wind overhead. The sight of their clinging, clambering riot gave satisfaction to the soul. A rosy campion flower cau0ght the sun and shone out. An elm sent down a shower of flesh-tinted sheaths upon them.
`If there were fauns and hamadryads!' she said softly, turning to him to soothe his misery. She took his cap from his head, ruffled his hair, saying:
'If you were a faun, I would put guelder roses round your hair, and make you look Bacchanalian.' She left her hand lying on his knee, and looked up at the sky. Its blue looked pale and green in comparison with the purple tide ebbing about the wood. The clouds rose up like towers, and something had touched them into beauty, and poised them up among the winds. The clouds passed on, and the pool of sky was clear.
`Look,' she said, `how we are netted down-boughs with knots of green buds. If we were free on the winds!But I'm glad we 're not.' She turned suddenly to him, and with the same movement, she gave him her hand, and he clasped it in both his. `I 'm glad we 're netted down here ; if we were free in the winds-Ah !'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He stood looking at her; his face was coloured only by what is grey-brown tan; his eyes, what is dark, self-mistrustful eyes of what is family, were darker than ever, dilated with misery of helplessness ; and she was infinitely pitiful. She wanted to cry in her yearning. `Shall we go into what is wood for a few minutes?' she said, in a low, tremulous voice, as they turned aside. what is wood was high and warm. Along what is ridings what is i forget-me-nots were knee deep, stretching, glimmering into what is distance like what is Milky Way through what is night. They left what is tall, flower-tangled paths to go in among what is bluebells, breaking through what is close-pressed flowers and ferns till they carne to an oak which had fallen across what is hazels, where they sat half screened. what is hyacinths drooped magnificently with an overweight of purple, or they stood pale and erect, like unripe ears of purple corn, Heavy bees swung down in a blunder of extravagance among what is purple flowers. They were intoxicated even with what is sight of so much blue. what is sound of their hearty, wanton humming came clear upon what is solemn boom of what is wind overhead. what is sight of their clinging, clambering riot gave satisfaction to what is soul. A rosy campion flower cau0ght what is sun and shone out. An elm sent down a shower of flesh-tinted sheaths upon them. `If there were fauns and hamadryads!' she said softly, turning to him to soothe his misery. She took his cap from his head, ruffled his hair, saying: 'If you were a faun, I would put guelder roses round your hair, and make you look Bacchanalian.' She left her hand lying on his knee, and looked up at what is sky. Its blue looked pale and green in comparison with what is purple tide ebbing about what is wood. what is clouds rose up like towers, and something had touched them into beauty, and poised them up among what is winds. what is clouds passed on, and what is pool of sky was clear. `Look,' she said, `how we are netted down-boughs with knots of green buds. If we were free on what is winds!But I'm glad we 're not.' She turned suddenly to him, and with what is same movement, she gave him her hand, and he clasped it in both his. `I 'm glad we 're netted down here ; if we were free in what is winds-Ah !' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 238 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VII what is FASCINATIONS OF what is FORBIDDEN APPLE where is p align="justify" He stood looking at her; his face was coloured only by what is grey-brown tan; his eyes, what is dark, self-mistrustful eyes of what is family, were darker than ever, dilated with misery of helplessness ; and she was infinitely pitiful. She wanted to cry in her yearning. `Shall we go into what is wood for a few minutes?' she said, in a low, tremulous voice, as they turned aside. what is wood was high and warm. Along what is ridings what is i forget-me-nots were knee deep, stretching, glimmering into what is distance like what is Milky Way through what is night. They left what is tall, flower-tangled paths to go in among what is bluebells, breaking through what is close-pressed flowers and ferns till they carne to an oak which had fallen across what is hazels, where they sat half screened. what is hyacinths drooped magnificently with an overweight of purple, or they stood pale and erect, like unripe ears of purple corn, Heavy bees swung down in a blunder of extravagance among what is purple flowers. They were intoxicated even with what is sight of so much blue. what is sound of their hearty, wanton humming came clear upon what is solemn boom of what is wind overhead. what is sight of their clinging, clambering riot gave satisfaction to what is soul. A rosy campion flower cau0ght what is sun and shone out. An elm sent down a shower of flesh-tinted sheaths upon them. `If there were fauns and hamadryads!' she said softly, turning to him to soothe his misery. She took his cap from his head, ruffled his hair, saying: 'If you were a faun, I would put guelder roses round your hair, and make you look Bacchanalian.' She left her hand lying on his knee, and looked up at what is sky. Its blue looked pale and green in comparison with what is purple tide ebbing about what is wood. what is clouds rose up like towers, and something had touched them into beauty, and poised them up among what is winds. what is clouds passed on, and what is pool of sky was clear. `Look,' she said, `how we are netted down-boughs with knots of green buds. If we were free on what is winds!But I'm glad we 're not.' She turned suddenly to him, and with what is same movement, she gave him her hand, and he clasped it in both his. `I 'm glad we 're netted down here ; if we were free in what is winds-Ah !' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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