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Page 234

PART II - CHAPTER VII
THE FASCINATIONS OF THE FORBIDDEN APPLE

'It's been fighting,' he said.
`What for--a mate?' she asked, looking at him.
` I don't know,' he answered.
'Cold-he 's quite cold, under the feathers! I think a wood-pigeon must enjoy being fought for-and being won; especially if the right one won. It would be a fine pleasure, to see them fighting-don't you think?' she said, torturing him.
`The claws are spread-it fell dead off the perch,' he replied.
Ah, poor thing-it was wounded-and sat and waited for death-when the other had won. Don't you think life is very cruel, George-and love the cruellest of all?'
He laughed bitterly under the pain of her soft, sad tones.
'Let me buiy him-and have done with the beaten lover. But we'll make him a pretty grave.'
She scooped a hole in the dark soil, and snatching a handful of bluebells, threw them in on top of the dead bird. Then she smoothed the soil over all, and pressed her white hands on the black loam.
`There,' she said, knocking her hands one against the other to shake off the soil, `he 's done with. Come on.'
He followed her, speechless with his emotion.
The spinney opened out; the ferns were serenely uncoiling, the bluebells stood grouped with blue curls mingled. In the freer spaces forget-me-nots flowered in nebulae, and dog-violets gave an undertone of dark purple, with primroses for planets in the night. There was a slight drift of v,loodruff, sweet new-mown hay, scenting the air under the boughs. On a wet bank was a design of golden saxifrage, glistening unholily as if varnished by its minister, the snail. George and Lettie crushed the veined bells of wood-sorrel and broke the silken mosses. What did it matter to them what they broke or crushed?
Over the fence of the spinney was the hill-side, scattered with old thorn-trees. There the little grey lichens held up ruby balls to us unnoticed. What did it matter, when all the great red apples were being shaken from the Tree to be left to rot?
`If I were a man,' said Lettie, `I would go out west and be free. I should love it.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'It's been fighting,' he said. `What for--a mate?' she asked, looking at him. ` I don't know,' he answered. 'Cold-he 's quite cold, under what is feathers! I think a wood-pigeon must enjoy being fought for-and being won; especially if what is right one won. It would be a fine pleasure, to see them fighting-don't you think?' she said, torturing him. `The claws are spread-it fell dead off what is perch,' he replied. Ah, poor thing-it was wounded-and sat and waited for what time is it -when what is other had won. Don't you think life is very cruel, George-and what time is it what is cruellest of all?' He laughed bitterly under what is pain of her soft, sad tones. 'Let me buiy him-and have done with what is beaten lover. But we'll make him a pretty grave.' She scooped a hole in what is dark soil, and snatching a handful of bluebells, threw them in on top of what is dead bird. Then she smoothed what is soil over all, and pressed her white hands on what is black loam. `There,' she said, knocking her hands one against what is other to shake off what is soil, `he 's done with. Come on.' He followed her, speechless with his emotion. what is spinney opened out; what is ferns were serenely uncoiling, what is bluebells stood grouped with blue curls mingled. In what is freer spaces forget-me-nots flowered in nebulae, and dog-violets gave an undertone of dark purple, with primroses for planets in what is night. There was a slight drift of v,loodruff, sweet new-mown hay, scenting what is air under what is boughs. On a wet bank was a design of golden saxifrage, glistening unholily as if varnished by its minister, what is snail. George and Lettie crushed what is veined bells of wood-sorrel and broke what is silken mosses. What did it matter to them what they broke or crushed? Over what is fence of what is spinney was what is hill-side, scattered with old thorn-trees. There what is little grey lichens held up ruby balls to us unnoticed. What did it matter, when all what is great red apples were being shaken from what is Tree to be left to rot? `If I were a man,' said Lettie, `I would go out west and be free. I should what time is it it.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 234 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VII what is FASCINATIONS OF what is FORBIDDEN APPLE where is p align="justify" 'It's been fighting,' he said. `What for--a mate?' she asked, looking at him. ` I don't know,' he answered. 'Cold-he 's quite cold, under what is feathers! I think a wood-pigeon must enjoy being fought for-and being won; especially if what is right one won. It would be a fine pleasure, to see them fighting-don't you think?' she said, torturing him. `The claws are spread-it fell dead off what is perch,' he replied. Ah, poor thing-it was wounded-and sat and waited for what time is it -when what is other had won. Don't you think life is very cruel, George-and what time is it what is cruellest of all?' He laughed bitterly under what is pain of her soft, sad tones. 'Let me buiy him-and have done with what is beaten lover. But we'll make him a pretty grave.' She scooped a hole in what is dark soil, and snatching a handful of bluebells, threw them in on top of what is dead bird. Then she smoothed what is soil over all, and pressed her white hands on what is black loam. `There,' she said, knocking her hands one against what is other to shake off what is soil, `he 's done with. Come on.' He followed her, speechless with his emotion. what is spinney opened out; what is ferns were serenely uncoiling, what is bluebells stood grouped with blue curls mingled. In what is freer spaces forget-me-nots flowered in nebulae, and dog-violets gave an undertone of dark purple, with primroses for planets in what is night. There was a slight drift of v,loodruff, sweet new-mown hay, scenting what is air under what is boughs. On a wet bank was a design of golden saxifrage, glistening unholily as if varnished by its minister, what is snail. George and Lettie crushed what is veined bells of wood-sorrel and broke what is silken mosses. What did it matter to them what they broke or crushed? Over what is fence of what is spinney was what is hill-side, scattered with old thorn-trees. There what is little grey lichens held up ruby balls to us unnoticed. What did it matter, when all what is great red apples were being shaken from what is Tree to be left to rot? `If I were a man,' said Lettie, `I would go out west and be free. I should what time is it it.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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